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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone know what wire can be tapped into that will kill the injection pump. Our local tractor pullers want us to start running some sort of kill switch. They are leaning more towards killing the pump than using an air shut off. Also I would like to know for fords and Dodges also if you know. They have pretty much came to me to find out how to do it. If anyone does know where air shutoffs can be had, that would help also. Thanks Edited by: White Duramax
 

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You could cut one of the wires going to the fuel pump relay. That would do the trick.
 

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Outa my field but, how bout a electric fuel shut of valve.
 

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I was spending time in the Helms manuals this week researching another fuel issue and may have some info to help. I don't think our injections pumps can be "shut off" electrically. It's engine driven with a solenid used for controlling pressure. The fuel pump relay in the underhood fuse box is actually for a fuel transfer pump on a chassis cab with dual tanks. Just to make sure, I pulled this relay and the truck kept right on running. What I did find are two ignition circuit wires running between the ECM and the FICM. I am thinking that turning the ignition key to "run" energizes this circuit through the ECM. A kill switch, then, could either interrupt the ignition signal to the ECM or the two ignition circuits to the FICM? So, you wouldn't be killing the injection pump - you'd be killing the injectors - the end result is the same - engine stops. This would be the same as turning of the ignition with the key. What type of kill switch are you looking at?


I'm not a tech so I'm not at all sure about this - just relaying what I've found in Helms that may help. Perhaps best described as somewhere between a guess and actual knowledge. I can get you page numbers of what I was looking at but maybe one of our member Technicians can help further? I can certainly scan and send you the Helms diagrams if that would help.


Good Luck,


Don
 

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all you have to do is tie into the power side of the IGN 1 relay. If you pull that relay when the truck is running, it dies.
 

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The injection pump is hard geared to the front camshaft.
The only wires going to it go to the Rail Pressure Control Valve. Disconnecting that cause a default highest pressure setting.

I like Eric's idea of shutting down power to the IGN1. Works the same as turning the key off.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Eric, this is in the inderhood fuse box right? How can I tell which wire it is coming out of the box or is there another way to wire a kill switch into this. Basically for a kill switch I am going to put connectors on the wire then have two wires running to the back of the truck that are connected by some kind of plug that can be pulled out to break the circuit, thus kill the truck.
 

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Ditto what Eric said.

The IGN 1 Relay will remove power to both the ECM and the FICM. The Fuel Pump (FP) Relay is typically not used on our trucks, unless you have the Dual Tank Option, so this will do nothing to kill your engine.
Instead of disconnecting from the power side of this relay, (higher current), you should be able to interrupt the low current signal controlling the relay coil by removing the 22 gauge GRY/BLK wire (wire 2219), from connector C2 (Black), pin A-11 at Fuse Block-Underhood.
You would now have to install some sort of Kill Switch between this lifted GRY/BLK wire and C2, pin A-11. The following GM #12110844 crimp connectors should work for the Fuse Block Underhood connections.

Reference Helms 2002, pages 8-53, 6-2818, 8-41
 

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Do to the various applications and so many possibilities I would say shutting off the fuel would be solution. A solenoid like they use for fuel on nitrous systems might be the answer. Low amp draws and easy setup. On electronic systems I would still use what available in conjunction with the solenoid. Can't never be to safe.
 
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