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I hear bad things about EGR, and how the soot it brings back into the engine makes rings and cylinders wear out faster. I would think the hardened cylinders in the Duramax would be better at handling this than if they were not hardened. So, will having EGR shorten the life of the engine?
 

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I don't know for sure the results in the longevity of the motor but I do know that I would rather not have one given the choice. The EGR will add alot of soot to the motor.Edited by: Max Power
 

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Just run your finger across the inside of a Diesel tailpipe. Now look at your finger and decide if you want any amount of what you see on your finger going into your intake.
 

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IMHO, generaly speaking, no, it would not be as good. That said, more and more of this type of thing is on the way from all manufactures if they don't have it and a cat already. A cat seems like it would be a soot trap to me. It's just the times and the way it's going to be. I would not worry too much about it as most all will be in the same boat and there's not much that can be done about it.


Steve
 

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I have 600 mi on my truck now. I am changing the oil tomorrow, replacing the factory stuff with Delo 15/40 and a ACDelco filter (that I paid too much for the stealer). In the next few weeks I will change the both diffs and transfer case and Allison spin-on. (I will put about 100 mi per week for the next few weeks). In the long run (after 5000 mi), I plan to change oil every 5,000 and use synthetic - probably Schaffaers (is it API certified?) or Delvac. I plan to have the required changes done at the dealer and do the extra ones myself. That way I save some money but have the warranty security of having the required services done at the dealer. Hompefully the frequent oil changes will help with the extra soot problem?
 

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We aren't alone guys.. I know the new Detroit Diesel 60 series has an egr system as well. My guess is that in a few years, it will be almost impossible to find a new diesel motor (for highway use) without an egr system of some sort. Of course, time will tell what it does to the diesel truck industry, both in the light and heavy truck market.
 

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Most all engines have EGR, you just don't know it. On the exhaust stroke, the exhaust gases are not scavenged 100%. This is the same as EGR. Some cars got rid of the external EGR by altering the cam events. Don't be too surprised if the same eventually happens to diesels.
 

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I was wondering if anyone knew what accuated the EGR opening/closing event and at what temperature?


I have info from another diesel place member that leads me to think it only recirculates at 1500 degrees and above, which would make it much less of a factor than previously thought.
 

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Well I got an education today that I really didn't need. My next door neighbor (real good friend) asked me to help him adjust the valves on his 1996 "Comealong" with 200,000 miles on it. So now I know how to that.....not that you guys care...... but the fascinating thing here, is it has an EGR system on it.



Now as far as our trucks are concerned. The Tech II showed my 03 at normal operating temp....at an idle....with the EGR open a certain % (sorry I don't remember the exact #) Also open at part throttle cruise.


Seemed like the only time it wasn't open was during WOT. Which is pretty much how I remember the description of how they are supposed to work.
 

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egr and diesel is a bad idea. when i had my 97 tahoe with the 6.5td & egr it gave me nothing but problems. i hand made a custom aluminum "test" gasket for the egr valve and everything was goodEdited by: nickleinonen
 

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The current LLY engine recirculates ( I think ) 20%.. In the near future, that will be bumped to ( I think ) 40%. Another thing to consider regarding the dumping of 'soot' back into the engine is that these newer diesels are much more efficient at burning more of that up. So you really dont have that much of an issue. Lastly, While its required to meet emmisions, dont think that GM is gonna put something on an engine that will shorten its life in the competitive diesel pickup market
 

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I will speculate: You could ask yourself the converse of the question,,,, will the EGR lengthen the life of the engine? I seriously doubt it. I also think that in the long run, it will shorten the life of the DMAX. How much, I do not know. It cannot be a good thing to dump exhaust gas and everything that goes with it back into the engine. Granted, the soot is sub-micronic in size. Much smaller than anything that is trapped by the air filter (on the intake side). There are also acidic byproducts from the combustion process. Both the soot and the other byproducts are taken care of by the "CI" rated motor oil. Remember, the "CI" rating came about specifically for the purpose of handling the extra "crap" introduced into the motor from the EGR process.


I have an EGR equipped truck. No problems to date. Don't really even know it is there. It will most likely still be running long after I sell it. So it does not bother me.
 

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How could I tell if I had an EGR on my Dmax? it's an 04' LB7, thanks.


Dan
 

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You most likely don't (if you bought the truck in Ohio). The easiest way is to look for the CAT (EGR/CAT come together). Look under the truck. If you have only exhaust pipe between the muffler and the downpipe, you do not have a CAT and will not have EGR. If you have a large cylinder about 8 inches in diameter and about 12 inches long between the muffler and downpipe then you have a CAT and your truck will be EGR equipped.
 

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All that soot still has to go through the intake. My '97 6.5TD at about 250,000 started giving all kinds of trouble with EGR codes. When I removed the EGR valve I noticed alot of soot in the intake. It had built up so much that the back two cylinders must have been only getting a bit of air. I cleaned out the intake as best I could and the codes went away. Traded the truck at 300,000 kms before the LLY came out because I didn't want another EGR engine and catalytic convertor. They will most definately make the engine wear out sooner and cause a lot of problems on high mileage motors. I bought a diesel to put miles on it not sit in the driveway.
 

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Supposedly the VW TDIs have a clogging problem, but they have a bit of a different design too. EGR with another recirculation system (can't recall exactly) that may expedite things. I recall the system needed to be carefully cleaned as chunks @ the intake were detrimental to the engine. It was about $300 to have it cleaned out at the shop or you could take the chance of doing it yourself.
 

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You remove the intake manifold and get it ultrasonically cleaned.
 

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Well I just had to check to make sure. Yup no cat/egr on my truck. I think that they are going to get more restrictive on the motors that are built here in the very near future with more emissions laws coming out things will get tougher. Edited by: GMC2500HD
 

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Next logical step is to block the EGR without setting a code....


Any ideas on how to do it?
 
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