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Guys,


I am looking for the best made, and easiest to use Weight Dist. Hitch... The trailer has a little less than 1000 pounds tongue weight and the trailer is about 10,000 loaded.....


Been looking at reese and eaz-lift.........





What do you guys like?Edited by: ISurvivedNMU
 

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I did ALOT of research on this one year ago (Feb). Hensley Arrow makes the best hitch, but it runs about $2800 new (ouch)! Pullrite is about the same, but runs about $2000 new (can pick up used ones for $1000 or less). Both these hitches effectively move the pivot point to the axle-- like a 5th wheel setup, which make them the best. Way too expensive though...

Of the others, the Equalizer Hitch is the best (IMHO). It virtually eliminates sway (the worst is some minor movement in extreme conditions), is easy to hitch/unhitch, and the price is reasonable. Check it out here. The best price I found was RV Supply Warehouse ($453 delivered).

The next best is Reese with the Dual Cam, which is probably just as effective, but maybe $100 more and not quite as nice of design-- still an excellent choice.

If you want to see LOTS of info on this, do some searches on Open Roads Forum

Paul.Edited by: PaulRahoi
 

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i have the drawtite cam-style, cam-style does work the best,$950.00 list and i am selling the hole set up with #600lbs bars
 

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I have the Reese Strait-Line Hitch. I think it's the best hitch for the money.


I just did my first test tow with the new baby and our 30ft Trail-Lite we got last June.


I have WD hitches for both the Grand Cherokee and the Truck, (long story involves wife don't ask),.


I just had to readjust the anti-sway cams for the new truck and I was ready to go. The test pull went just great. Our trucks pull trailers just like everyone says, you don't even notice theres something hook up. (well, a little).


I have had real good stability with the Strait-Line hitch. When we were looking to purchase our trailer, I went to the open roads forum, (RV.net), and lurked, read and studied until I found out that the Reese HP Dual-Cam WD hitch was the best set-up for long trailer, short wheelbase tow vehicles.


I can tell you that the hitch was able to prevent sway even attached to my Jeep. (yep the Jeep was at it's GVWR and GCVWR, about 200lbs under loaded).


The reason I got the Dmax was due to power and the fact that the Jeep-Trail-Lite combination was a lesson in physics. The trailer weighed for than the Jeep which caused a little too much push for my comfort. No problems anymore.



I am also running the prodigy brake controller and I swear by that thing. It's a beautiful controller, no jerkyness, smooth braking and the rig is a pleasure to drive. My test pull was in the rain with sleet and I had the criuse set at 60 and had no worrys. Even did a couple of panic brakes to see how the rig would handle. No problems.





With all that being said, the Hensley Arrow is a very nice hitch, but expensive. Check out the RV forums and decide for yourself. It all depends on your comfort level. Remember no hitch in the world will protect you from stupidity..
 

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I've just gone through this drill, myself. I agree with Paul's assessment. The Hensley and the PullRite are in a class all their own. I would give the nod to Hensley because there is no worry about interference with the spare tire and it's more "gadgety," which I like. The PullRite is a better deal.

From what I've been able to learn, the Reese Dual Cam (or Strait-Line) and the Equal-i-zer hitches are about equal. They work differently, though so one may suit a particular need better than the other. The Dual Cam uses a form of spring tension to force the trailer to stay in line, while the Equal-i-zer is a variation on the friction sway control theme. If you already have a Reese WD hitch you can add the Dual Cam sway control very cheaply. If you are starting from scratch, the Equal-i-zer is a better deal. It comes in a complete package with everything you need to install and use it (except the ball).

After consulting owners of my specific truck/trailer combination and listening to their suggestions, I chose the Equal-i-zer.
 

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I sure do like the Hensley. You forget the travel trailer is back there. I's overpriced but beefy. A lot easier to hook up then their web site leaves one to believe and you leave it on the trailer.
 

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I've heard that the biggest advantage of the Reese over the Equalizer is that you can lubricate the Reese at friction points and make adjustments for wear. Can anyone verify or comment?
 

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Spindrift,

I don't know about the Reese, but the Equal-i-zer instructions call for greasing the friction points as part of normal operation of the hitch. And by periodically tightening the nuts on the friction head to factory specs you can adjust for wear. There are Equal-i-zer owners claiming over 100k miles of service from their units, so wear doesn't seem to be a problem. This, of course, doesn't make it better than a Reese, but I don't think wear is a concern when deciding which to buy.

TC
 

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spindrift said:
I've heard that the biggest advantage of the Reese over the Equalizer is that you can lubricate the Reese at friction points and make adjustments for wear. Can anyone verify or comment?

The lube points is the pivots for the load bars to the WD hitch.


You can't lube the Cams as they need the resistance to work properly.


The cams must be adjusted periodically for changes in load or vehicle. It only takes a few minutes. I just readjusted mine to the truck last week.
 

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Tsckey:


You wrote,


(From what I've been able to learn, the Reese Dual Cam (or Strait-Line) and the Equal-i-zer hitches are about equal. They work differently, though so one may suit a particular need better than the other.)


Can you be more specific in terms of how the two different assemblies may suit an individual's needs? Is it type of driving, speed, ease of back-up, maneuverability in tight spaces (campgrounds), etc.?


Also...what should a TT dealer allow for a test pull? Is an older, but equal weight and dimensioned TT o.k. for the test? Or does it have to be the one you're considering to purchase?
 

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Spindrift,

Part of this is information gained from my research, part from experience. The Reese Dual Cam or Strait-Line hithch adds to the basic Reese WD hitch additional bars that engage the WD spring bars. These apply a springing force anytime the TV and TT are out of line, forcing the trailer back into column with the truck. There is a point, as when turning, when the angle between the TV and the trailer overcomes the engagement "cams" on the sway control and allows tight turns when necessary. As the turn is completed, the cams pop back into place again providing sway control. The Equal-i-zer works entirely differently. Its spring bars pivot in a high-friction hitch head and actively resist any movement at all. In addition, the spring bars themselves rest on brackets bolted to the trailer that provide both weight distribution and additional frictional resistance to sway. To some extent, the Equal-i-zer acts like a big, horizontal brake that attempts to resist all movement. The Reese actively applies a self-centering force to the trailer trying to push it back in line. My guess is, and I will readily defer to those with more experience, that the Reese probably works best with trailers that are inherently more stable and need help resisting external forces, like truck wash, that try to force them out of position. The Equal-i-zer tries to resist all motion and might have a slight advantage where a trailer tends to be more lively and dances around at the slightest provocation. Also, the Equal-i-zer hitch will work with surge brakes, because the spring bars permit the trailer tongue to slide back and forth, where a chain-style WD hitch tends to prevent that movement. Both hitches have their fans and I have no way of knowing whether one is better than the other. The consensus seems to be, though, that if you want the best sway controlling hitch, you must get either a Hensley or a PullRite, which effectively move the hitch pivot forward to the rear axle and mimic the towing characteristics of a fifth wheel trailer. I would buy the Hensley in a heartbeat, but for the knee-weakening price.

TC
 

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TC...thanks for that.


Can someone weigh in on the things that should be considered when asking the dealer for a test pull?
 

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spindrift,


if you're going to test pull, have them, if they will, set the hitch up that you are interested in. This is tough as all of these hitches mentioned are not the easy movers.


Otherwise, the only thing you're going to be checking is the TV's ability to pull the load and kind of how the trailer is going to respond.
 

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I have an Equal-i-zer and have had NO problems with it at all as of this date. I would also suggest the Prodigy brake controller......with this set-up you should be "Bulletproof"
 

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Reese


(To answer your question)
 

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I have to differ with those that think the Hensley Arrow is the way to go. I've been using the Hensley for over two years and 20,000 miles. While the Hensley does eliminate sway caused by passing trucks and cross winds, I can not get used to the trailer riding up on the cams and giving you a bump every time you let off the throttle, especially going down hill or in a curve situation. I've spoke to the people at Hensley about it and all they can say is you have to ride the brakes to keep the trailer pulling backwards. This defeats the purpose of the Allison Tow/Haul mode. I have never had a problem, but it is still quite an uncomfortable feeling. I have electro-hydraulic disc brakes on the trailer so I have good effective braking, but why should I have to ride them unless I need to slow or stop. Doesn't make sense to me.


I towed with a Pull-rite for about 15 years before going to the Hensley, it is an extreamly stable tow system. I only reason I switched is be cause Pull-rite's are made for specific models and it would not fit the new Chev. It gets spendy buying a new hitch every time you get a new truck. I'm considering replacing the Hensley even with the investment.


BobEdited by: Tinbender
 

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Tinbender,


It's nice to see some honest feedback about the Hensley or Pull-Rite. Those are good but pricey hitches. I went with the Strait-Line Hitch from Resse because it was the best bang for buck.


Those engineered hitches probably work very well for the majority of the TV's on the road, but if you have a tow vehicle that is engineered for towing, such as the Dmax/Allison combo, there can be some unforseen side effects.


We just got back from vacationing in Hilton Head, SC and the truck and trailer, (30ft trail-lite, 6100 lbs) performed very well. It was an 810 mile trip one way, down I-77, I-26, I-95, and I was never worried about the lack of power or stopping ability. I ran about 60-65 on the way down and 65-70 on the way back. Milage down was about 12.3 mpg and 11.5 on the way back. Used Stanadyne Performance Additive in all fuelings.


The only thing our trucks won't do is give you a warm fuzzy when High cross-winds are present. I didn't noticed them in the truck so much, as I could see in the rocking of the trailer at 65 mph. Very uncomfortable feeling.
 

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If all you do is pull ONE trailer, and a big heavy one at that, you can NOT beat a Pull-Rite.

However, it prevents you from towing other trailers that weigh more than 5,000lbs (unless you have another "setup" on each trailer), as when locked straight, it attempts to act like a regular reciever.

As for "white knuckle" driving.....that disappears with the Pull-Rite. It turns your conventional trailer into a 5th wheel trailer. A Pull-Rites' almost mandatory for any conventional trailer over 10,000lbs. Dual cam just doesn't cut it when you get tall and heavy.
 
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