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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I'm trying to find out what's really going on with my van. The gauge shows that it is overheating but I'm not sure how accurate it is. When I use the temperature-sensing gun where should I take it?
When the van's gauge claims 240, the upper radiator hose reads 180, the oil pan is about 185, and the block where the temperature sensor is installed reads 225.
Does this sound normal?
Thanks
 

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maybe you could pickup a mechanical gauge for 35 bucks and screw it in where your temp senser is now and see what it reads. think you gauge is wacko. you are on the right track.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Any ideas out there? I just need to know where (what spot) to take the temperature so that I can really find out if my van has a problem and if I'm helping or hurting it.
And can any one tell me how hot is to hot? I just need to now what the normal range for the 6.2L is and when I should be concerned. Is 205 ok what about 210 or 220. Will it kill my van if it hits those temps on a hill but doesn't stay there for long?
I've been looking around but I just can't seem to find any hard numbers.
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i would be worried if it ran without towing above 210f. most the time mine runs 190f. i have had 6.2s i have towed with run higher for short time but i usually backed off throttle and turned on the heater.
 

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Any ideas out there? I just need to know where (what spot) to take the temperature so that I can really find out if my van has a problem and if I'm helping or hurting it.
You can get a good --- and comparable --- temperature reading from the coolant where the sender for the temperature gauge is. You can get a mechanical gauge for about $16, and once you have it installed, you can always see the temperature. The stock gauges are known for being inaccurate.

I'm seeing 195F with a 195F thermostat, 180F to 190F with a 180F thermostat. I don't know how high it gets in the summer with a 195F thermostat, though.
 

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Take the reading right at the thermostat outlet, that is the most reliable source as the thermostat regulates the temp and it hasn't had time to cool going to the radiator.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thanks

Can I just go down to Pep Boys and buy any water Temp. gauge or do I need something special?
 

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thanks

Can I just go down to Pep Boys and buy any water Temp. gauge or do I need something special?
Any will do, just remember, the cheaper the unit, the less accurate it can be.
 

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The one I have is from iequus, but any other should be fine. They come with adapters to make them fit on different vehicles. Use some teflon tape and/or some silicone sealant to prevent leaks. You may also need to drill a hole through the firewall, about 20mm in diameter.
 

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Now the truth about aftermarket gauges is that they aren't all THAT accurate. More accurate than the stock gauge, yes, but really not 100% accurate. I think that temp gun is probably more accurate... I guess I would use a temp reading near the thermostat housing/crossover pipe to gauge approximate engine temperature.

Then again, as you can see by the variation in temperature apparent when using the temp gun almost all temp numbers are fairly arbitrary. I honestly would simply make sure that the cooling system is in good shape (good radiator, hoses, water pump, etc.), the ignition timing is right, the engine isn't being overworked (by stuck brakes for example), and then establish a "norm" with whatever gauge you use (ignore the numbers), and go for broke. If it passes the norm all the sudden or starts heating up then I would start to worry about it. That's pretty much all the stock gauges were good for to begin with... Establish a "norm". That's the key.
 
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