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Discussion Starter #1
So.. 2 days ago I changed the oil in my truck.
Yesterday I put 15$ of fuel in my truck just to get me into town where I always fill my truck up. Stopped to car wash on way to pump and truck died 3 miles down the road. It got pretty loud about a mile before it died. Then i just almost lost all power. Tried letting off gas and back on a couple times and it just spat and sputtered almost? Then shut off completely. So I pulled to side of road coasting. And it wouldn't restart. And hasn't since.
CEL codes are P0335 and P0676.
I just recently in the last few months replaced that glow plug. And just put a new crankshaft sensor in tonight. Still wouldn't fire. Then I replaced fuel filter for the hell of it. To seenifnthatbwas the problem. (Justbreplaced less than 3k mikes ago)
Still no start. ??
Any advice?

The only mods that I'm aware of are dpf delete. And k&n intake. Efi live 180k on the clock
 

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did you have any water in the filter when you changed it? Can you prime the filter? Is the crankshaft sensor installed correctly? Did it come unplugged?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
No water in the filter, yes filter is primed, the sensor can only go in one way. It's in fully seated and bolted. And no it didn't come unplugged. It was actually kind of a pain to get unplugged, bc it was built up with some sand and such from the roads. I took a video of the truck turning over bc it even sounded odd cranking. But I can't seem to figure out how to upload it.
 

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maybe it is time to check to see if you are getting fuel, need to put a gauge in the port and see what pressure you are getting while cranking. I would check all fuses as well. I am pretty sure you don't any air filters problems but it wouldn't hurt to check even it is just to say I checked...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The air filter is less than a week old. I just replaced that last week. So I know it's not that. I'll check for fuel pressure tonight. I also read something about the reluctor wheel going bad.
My other thought were the injection pump. Is there a way to test it?
 

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When you say"it sounded bad before it quit", did it make noises like that? I'm sorry but that sound serious. Use a pry bar and see if the crank moves in and out the front of the motor.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It didn't make noises like this at all. It just kind of got louder at the exhaust. Like more drone from the exhaust in the cab. Then right before it died. It was almost like the traction control was activating and just didn't have anything at the gas pedal. Then it died. And this is how it has turned over ever since
 

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I'm sorry but that sound serious. Use a pry bar and see if the crank moves in and out the front of the motor.
Or Its the reluctor wheel. Pull the sensor out and shine a flashlight in the hole. Theres a plate in there that should line up with the sensor but most likely, it'd be sitting back towards the cab.

Crankshaft Position (CKP)
http://www.dieselplace.com/forum/63-gm-diesel-engines/21-6-5l-diesel-engine/348699-code-p0335-crankshaft-position-sensor.html
Reluctor wheel
http://www.dieselplace.com/forum/63-gm-diesel-engines/40-duramax-second-generation-2004-5-2005-lly/48470-reluctor-wheel-timing.html
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Or Its the reluctor wheel. Pull the sensor out and shine a flashlight in the hole. Theres a plate in there that should line up with the sensor but most likely, it'd be sitting back towards the cab.

Crankshaft Position (CKP)
http://www.dieselplace.com/forum/63-gm-diesel-engines/21-6-5l-diesel-engine/348699-code-p0335-crankshaft-position-sensor.html
Reluctor wheel
http://www.dieselplace.com/forum/63-gm-diesel-engines/40-duramax-second-generation-2004-5-2005-lly/48470-reluctor-wheel-timing.html
I checked the reluctor wheel last night. As soon as I pop the sensor it's right there lined up in the hole.

I found on a separate post somewhere last night that if my CEL stays luminated while cranking there's a bad sensor somewhere. Could the new crank sensor still be bad? Also I've heard the cam sensor pretty goes along with crank sensor if one goes the other goes to? But wouldn't it throw a. Code for that?
Could the crank sensor failing cause the timing to be off and that's what's happeneing?
 

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I checked the reluctor wheel last night. As soon as I pop the sensor it's right there lined up in the hole.
So it looked as if it was in the right spot. That's not the way to test reluctor wheel.
Using a long thin screwdriver wiggle it back and forth. If any play it's needing replacement.

Did you put in a genuine GM Part No.: 97365037

Did you check your 5-Volt Reference and pins to ground?

Here is a diagnostic flow chart direct from GM for problem solving a crank but doesn't fire condition on a 6.6 Duramax. It should be applicable for the LB7, LLY, LBZ and LLM.

Engine Cranks but Does Not Run
Circuit Description

The Engine Cranks but Does Not Run diagnostic table is an organized approach to identifying a condition that causes an engine not to start. The Engine Cranks but Does Not Run diagnostic table directs the service technician to the appropriate system diagnosis.

The Engine Cranks But Does Not Run diagnostic table assumes the following:
• The batteries are completely charged. Refer to Battery Inspection/Test in Engine Electrical.
• The cranking speed is within specifications. Refer to Engine Cranks Slowly in Engine Electrical.
• There is adequate fuel in the fuel tanks.
Diagnostic Aids

If the cause of an engine cranks but will not run condition has not been found, inspect for the following conditions:
• Hard starting only in cold ambient temperatures. These may cause an intermittent condition that may not occur in the service bay:
- Fuel heater inoperative, refer to Fuel Heater Inoperative .
- Ice blockage at the fuel pickup in the fuel tank. This will be a high vacuum in the supply lines while cranking, and the problem will disappear after the vehicle is brought in the service bay. It may also exhibit a start and stall condition or a starting condition with no acceleration.
• The correct cranking speed is 100 RPM cold and 180 RPM hot. A scan tool can be used to inspect cranking speed by pulling the ignition 1 relay and monitoring engine speed on the scan tool while cranking.
• Water or foreign material in fuel system
• A basic engine problem
• If the crankshaft position (CKP) sensor and the camshaft position (CMP) sensor are disconnected or malfunctioning at the same time, an Engine Cranks But Does Not Run condition will exist.
Test Description

The numbers below refer to the step numbers on the diagnostic table.

5.

This step tests for an ignition 1 voltage supply to the engine control module (ECM).
6.

This step tests the 12-volt reference circuit to the CKP sensor and the CMP sensor. The 12-volt reference circuit for the CKP sensor and the CMP sensor is connected internally within the ECM. If the 12-volt reference circuit is shorted to ground, the engine will not start and no engine speed will be indicated on the scan tool.
7.

If there is fuel in the engine oil, fuel may be leaking from the fuel injector or fuel injection pump into the crankcase.
8.

If the fuel system will not even briefly prime to 10 psi and will not start, the check valve in the fuel filter/heater element housing is stuck open.
9.

This step determines if the fuel system is bleeding down causing a no start. The fuel pressure will slowly drop to 0 psi, but should still be above 8 psi 10 seconds after pressurizing the fuel system.
11.

This step determines if the problem is a stuck open or broken fuel injector. If fuel vapors come out of any of the glow plug holes, excessive fuel is being sent into a cylinder, and not being distributed to all of the fuel injectors.
12.

The engine will not run without an actual fuel rail pressure more than 10 MPa (1,450 psi).
14.

If the no-start condition takes place in cold operating temperatures, 2-4°C (35-40°F) or colder, a glow plug system failure may cause the no-start condition.
17.

In some cases, no compression, possibly with excessive fuel, in a single cylinder can cause a no start
1-

Did you perform the Diagnostic System Check - Engine Controls?

yes-Go to Step 2
no-Go to Diagnostic System Check - Engine Controls

2-


1. Turn On the ignition, with the engine OFF.
2. Observe the DTC Information with a scan tool.

Does the scan tool display DTC P0090, P0335, P0336, P0340, P0370, P0374, P0380, P0601, P0602, P0603, P0604, P0611, P0612, P1621, P1626, P1631, P1683, or U1800?

yes-Go to Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) List
no-Go to Step 3

3-

Is the customer's concern with a fuel smell or fuel leak?

yes-Go to Fuel Leaks
no-Go to Step 4

4-

Observe the Actual Fuel Rail Pressure parameter with a scan tool.

Is the pressure within the specified range? 1-1.8 MPa

yes-Go to Step 5
no-Go to Step 18

5-

Observe the Ignition 1 signal parameter with a scan tool.

Is the Ignition 1 signal parameter at the specified value? B+

yes-Go to Step 6
no-Go to Step 24

6-
1. Attempt to start the engine.
2. Observe the Engine Speed parameter with a scan tool while the engine is cranking.

Is the Engine Speed parameter more than the specified value? 0 RPM

yes-Go to Step 7
no-Go to Step 19

7-
Inspect for the following conditions:
• Excessive fuel in the engine oil--Refer to Fuel in Engine Oil in Engine Mechanical.
• Contaminated Fuel--Refer to Contaminants-in-Fuel Diagnosis .

Did you find and correct the condition?

yes-Go to Step 34
no-Go to Step 8

8-
1. Install the J 44638 Vacuum Gage to the fuel system service port on the right front side of the engine.
2. Attempt to hand prime the fuel manager 30 times or until the specified pressure is reached.

Can you prime the system to the specified value? 8 psi

yes-Go to Step 9
no-Go to Step 31

9-

Does the pressure measure more than the specified value for more than 2 minutes? 2 psi

yes-Go to Step 10
no-Go to Step 13

10-

Perform the Engine Compression Test. Refer to Engine Compression Test in Engine Mechanical - 6.6L. Repair the engine as necessary.

Did you find and correct the condition?

yes-Go to Step 34
no-Go to Step 11

11-

Did any of the cylinders emit any fuel vapor during the Engine Compression Test?

yes-Go to Step 28
no-Go to Step 12

12
1. Crank the engine for 15 seconds.
2. Observe the Actual Fuel Rail Pressure parameter with a scan tool.

Is the Actual Fuel Rail Pressure parameter more than the specified value? 10 MPa (1,450 psi)

yes-Go to Step 14
no-Go to Step 13

13
1. Reprime the fuel manager to 10 psi.
2. Attempt to start the engine while the prime is still above 8 psi.

Does the engine start?

yes-Go to Fuel System Diagnosis
no- Go to Fuel System Diagnosis - High Pressure Side

14-

Observe the Glow Plug System Type parameter with a scan tool.

Is the Glow Plug System Type Federal?

yes-Go to Step 15
no-Go to Step 16

15-

Important: Repeat this procedure on both banks of the engine. This test may be repeated as many times as necessary.

1. Turn OFF the ignition.
2. Connect a test lamp to a glow plug harness connector and a good ground on one side of the engine.
3. Turn ON the ignition, with the engine OFF.

Does the test lamp turn ON and OFF?

yes-Go to Step 16
no-Go to Glow Plug System Diagnosis

16

Important: If there is high resistance in the signal or low reference circuits of the crankshaft position (CKP) sensor the Engine Speed parameter of the scan tool will display a value more than 0. It will not be an accurate measure of engine speed, and can cause an Engine Cranks but does Not Run condition.

Test the CKP sensor signal and low reference circuits for high resistance. Refer to Circuit Testing in Wiring Systems.

Did you find and correct the condition?

yes-Go to Step 34
no- Go to Step 17

17

Inspect for the following conditions:
• A plugged air filter
• A collapsed air intake duct
• The fuel heater is inoperative. If the customer concern is that the engine will not start when ambient temperatures are less than 2-4°C (35-40°F), refer to Fuel Heater Inoperative .
• A restricted exhaust system--Refer to Symptoms - Engine Exhaust in Engine Exhaust.

Did you find and correct the condition?

yes- Go to Step 34
no- Go to Diagnostic Aids

18-
1. Disconnect the fuel rail pressure (FRP) sensor.
2. Observe the Actual Fuel Rail Pressure parameter on the scan tool.

Does the Actual Fuel Rail Pressure parameter measure more than the specified value? 175 MPa


yes-Go to Step 23
no- Go to Step 22

19.
1. Turn OFF the ignition.
2. Disconnect the CKP sensor.
3. Turn ON the ignition, with the engine OFF.
4. Probe the 12-volt reference circuit of the CKP sensor with a DMM connected to a good ground.

Is the voltage more than the specified value? 10 Volts yes-Go to Step 29 no- Go to Step 20

20-
1. Turn OFF the ignition.
2. Disconnect the camshaft position (CMP) sensor.
3. Turn ON the ignition, with the engine OFF.
4. Probe the 12-volt reference circuit of the CMP sensor with a DMM connected to a good ground.

Is the voltage more than the specified value? 10 Volts yes- Go to Step 30. no-Go to Step 21

21 Test the 12-volt reference circuit of the CKP sensor and the CMP sensor for a short to ground. Refer to Circuit Testing and to Wiring Repairs in Wiring Systems.

Did you find and correct the condition? yes- Go to Step 34. no-Go to Step 33

22- Test the FRP sensor signal circuit for a short to ground. Refer to Circuit Testing in Wiring Systems.

Did you find and correct the condition? yes- Go to Step 34. No- Go to Step 33

23- Test the FRP sensor circuits for high resistance. Refer to Circuit Testing in Wiring Systems.
Did you find and correct the condition? yes- go to step 34. no go to step 25

24-
1. Test the ignition 1 voltage circuit of the engine control module (ECM) for a short to ground, a high resistance, or an open. Refer to Circuit Testing and to Wiring Repairs in Wiring Systems.
2. Replace the fuse if necessary.

Did you find and correct the condition?

yes-Go to Step 34
no-Go to Step 26

25-
Test for an intermittent or for a poor connection at the FRP sensor. Refer to Testing for Intermittent Conditions and Poor Connections and Connector Repairs in Wiring Systems.

Did you find and correct the condition?

yes-Go to Step 34
no-Go to Step 32

26-
1. Clean and tighten the ECM shared ground. Refer to Power and Grounding Component Views in Wiring Systems.
2. Attempt to start the engine.

Does the engine start?

yes-Go to Step 34
no-Go to Step 27

27-

Test for an intermittent and for a poor connection at the ECM. Refer to Testing for Intermittent Conditions and Poor Connections and to Connector Repairs in Wiring Systems.

Did you find and correct the condition?

yes-Go to Step 34
no-Go to Step 33

28-

Important: When the fuel injector pressure lines are removed, debris will fall on the fuel injector inlet fitting. Vacuum the debris from the area to prevent the debris from falling in the fuel injector.

Replace the fuel injectors on the affected cylinders. Refer to Fuel Injector Replacement .

Did you complete the replacement?

yes-Go to Step 34


29-

Replace the CKP sensor. Refer to Crankshaft Position (CKP) Sensor Replacement .
Did you complete the replacement?

yes-Go to Step 34

30-

Replace the CMP sensor. Refer to Camshaft Position (CMP) Sensor Replacement .

Did you complete the replacement?

yes-Go to Step 34

31-

Important: Before replacing the fuel filter/heater element housing, inspect the fuel vent screw for damage or cross threading. Replace the vent screw w/"O" ring if either condition is found.

Replace the fuel filter/heater element housing. Refer to Fuel Filter/Heater Element Housing Replacement .

Did you complete the replacement?

yes-Go to Step 34


32-

Replace the FRP sensor. Refer to Fuel Rail Pressure (FRP) Sensor Replacement .

Did you complete the replacement?

yes-Go to Step 34

33-

Replace the engine control module (ECM). Refer to Engine Control Module (ECM) Replacement .

Did you complete the replacement?

yes-Go to Step 34

34-
1. Clear any DTCs with a scan tool.
2. Attempt to start the engine.

Does the engine start and continue to run?

yes-Go to Step 35
no-Go to Step 2

35-
1. Allow the engine to idle until normal operating temperature is reached.
2. Observe the DTC Information with a scan tool.

Are any DTCs displayed?

yes- Go to Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) List
no-System OK
 

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Discussion Starter #12
So I've concluded I'm not getting fuel. In my mechanic book for this truck it says to take the out line off the fuel filter turn engine over. And fuel should come out. But there isn't. But it does come out of I hit the primer. Injection pump?
 

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So I've concluded I'm not getting fuel. In my mechanic book for this truck it says to take the out line off the fuel filter turn engine over. And fuel should come out. But there isn't. But it does come out of I hit the primer. Injection pump?
You need to fix this in order for your truck to start.
Three things for your Code P0335
1) Crank Position Sensor (also Knock Sensor)
2) Reluctor Wheel
3) Wiring

Also note that 1 MPa (megapascal) is equal to approximately 145 PSI, 100 kpa is roughly 14.5 PSI.
It takes approximately 2500 PSI rail pressure to start.

No Start or Hard Start

1) Excessive fuel restriction, check or change fuel filter.
2) Use a vacuum gauge to check the suction side of the fuel system. You should have no more than 5 inches Hg at WOT (wide open throttle) or 7-8 inches Hg under load. If you still have too much restriction after changing the filter, check for collapsing soft fuel lines by the drivers side valve cover and under the truck near the transmission. The fuel tank pick up may also be plugged. Too little vacuum (less than 2 inches Hg) means that it could be sucking air.
3) Check for air in fuel system, install clears lines before and after the filter housing to check for air in the lines.
4) Confirm actual versus desired rail pressure, even under crank no start conditions
5) If the above are OK, then it comes down the following.
fuel injectors (see injectors for more diagnostic information)
high pressure injection pump
Fuel pressure regulator, check to make sure it is not stuck.
fuel pressure relief valve (high pressure limit valve), check to make sure it is not leaking into the return system when rail pressure is 160 MPa
6) Before condemning the high pressure pump you need to make sure there are no high pressure fuel leaks.
 
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Fuel Supply and Fuel Filter Housing

The fuel filter housing is on the suction side (there is not a supply pump from the factory) and are prone to suck air. Follow the GM fuel system diagnosis in the service manual.

1) Install fuel vacuum test tool.
2) Prime the fuel system with the hand primer until 10 PSI is indicated on the gauge, check for external leaks and repair. If the pressure drops from 10 PSI to 2 PSI in less than 1 minute, remove the fuel outlet line from the filter and cap it. Remove the ignition 1 relay and crank the engine for 2 – 15 second intervals, the high pressure pump should pull at least 12 inches of Hg vacuum. If air gets into the system it will cause a false/low reading.
3) Install clear hoses at the inlet and outlet of the fuel filter housing. Re-prime the system and then start the engine, there should be very little air going into or coming out of the fuel filter housing.
4) Common air ingestion places are the filter housing, drain valve, rubber hoses and quick connections. You need to use clear lines to isolate where the air is coming from and work your way back toward the tank until you don’t have any more air coming through the clear line. Unless you know where to get the tool that sees through black rubber lines to find air, your only other option is to bounce around and replace parts.

High Pressure Injection Pump (CP3 Pump)

1) Before condemning the pump for a starting issue you need to be certain that the rest of the high pressure fuel system is not leaking the pressure. Perform the injector return flow test.
2) If there has been a major contamination issue with dirt and or water then it is very likely that the high pressure pump will need to be replaced. The injectors are typically damaged first, but any contamination that got into the injectors went through the CP3 pump first.
3) The most common failure of the high pressure pump is the inability to keep up with high fuel demand such as towing a trailer up a hill. This problem will usually set a low rail pressure code.
4) Other Notes:
.If the vehicle has starting issues then the injectors are the most likely cause. Perform the injector return flow test.
.If the vehicle only acts up during a hard pull with a load and there are no restriction issues then it is more likely a HP pump causing the problem. A bad limit valve could also cause this problem.

Your not getting this code but it is fuel related.

P0087 Fuel Rail Pressure Too Low
See Enhanced Injector Return Flow Test above also.

1) Excessive restriction, fuel supply, plugged filter or sucking air. Install special tool J44638 to check vacuum restriction on fuel supply to the high pressure pump. Maximum restriction at WOT (wide open throttle) is 5 inches HG in park. When driving under hard acceleration maximum would be 7-8 inches Hg. If too high replace the fuel filter and retest.
1) Check the fuel lines on the drivers side valve cover and between the transmission and frame for kinking.
3) If restriction is only a couple of inches vacuum, that could indicate that the fuel supply system is sucking air, use clear fuel lines at the filter head to check for air.
4) Rail pressure should read 1-1.8 MPa with key on and engine off. If out of range replace the rail pressure sensor.
5) Check fuel return from the high pressure limit valve or fuel pressure relief valve. If it is leaking then it will need to be replaced. We have also heard of race plugs leaking, even if you have a race plug, you may want to check for leakage at max rail pressure.
6) With the engine up to operating temperature, use the scan tool to command rail pressure to 21,000 PSI, if the rail pressure will not achieve 21,000 PSI at idle you most likely have a problem with the injectors, Especially if you are having a hard start, miss, rough run or smoke and balance rates are excessive. Perform the enhanced injector return test.
7) Disconnect the fuel rail pressure sensor the fuel pressure should be greater than 175 MPa as displayed on the scan tool.
8) If these codes set only on hard acceleration or when pulling a hill with a load, check fuel supply issues first. Then see if rail pressure will reach 21,000 PSI at idle, if it does then the low rail pressure under a heavy load is usually caused by a bad high pressure pump.
 
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Discussion Starter #15
So it's clearly a fuel issue. Of some sort. I'm also not showing oil pressure when cranking which I found that if there's no oil pressure the injection pump basically is shut down by the computer to not blow up the engine. So should I show oil pressure when cranking? Is that the real issue and I'm not getting fuel pressure bc the computer is not allowing fuel pressure bc there's no oil pressure?
 

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So it's clearly a fuel issue. Of some sort. I'm also not showing oil pressure when cranking which I found that if there's no oil pressure the injection pump basically is shut down by the computer to not blow up the engine.
Thanks for the new info you found on if there's no oil pressure the injection pump basically is shut down by the computer to not blow up the engine.

For Code P0335
Ok, it's always time for a first.

Just like RVN4ME said.
No oil pressure until after the truck is running for about a second or two.
The engine cranking over via battery doesn't turn the pump fast enough to build oil pressure.

Here is another no start cause. But you don't have this code.
Camshaft Position Sensor P0340
This sensor is only used for starting, once started its not being monitored/ used.

Fix your P0335 and all will be good.

No Fuel pressure? FPR check out good. Oops that's not a P0335

How's your TCM? That will cause a no start. Oh that's a U code.

Trace your steps back.
1) I changed the oil in my truck. (Go over everything you did on your oil change)
2) Yesterday I put 15$ of fuel in my truck just to get me into town where I always fill my truck up. Stopped to car wash on way to pump and truck died 3 miles down the road. It got pretty loud about a mile before it died. (You got some bad fuel.)
 

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Discussion Starter #17
so after lots of trying to find collapsed fuel lines, leaks etc. i attempted to check the ground at the wire hooking to the crank sensor. With the test light hooked to the positive terminal of the battery. All three wires lit up saying ground. So I then switched the test light over to the ground terminal to double
Check for hot wires. And all three tested as a hot wire. How is this possible?
 

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CKP, CMP, MAF, MAP, BARO, FPR, FPRV,Presure, Temp etc.. Have a 5v reference.
It was posted above and it sounds like your not taking all of sugestions in.

CKS, CMP sensors will operate from .5-4.5v. Anything below .5 or above 4.5 will throw a code.
You will have a 5v ecm reference signal coming in on one wire, a ground, and an output signal.

The correct cranking speed is 100 RPM cold and 180 RPM hot.

so after lots of trying to find collapsed fuel lines, leaks etc. i attempted to check the ground at the wire hooking to the crank sensor. With the test light hooked to the positive terminal of the battery. All three wires lit up saying ground. So I then switched the test light over to the ground terminal to double
Check for hot wires. And all three tested as a hot wire. How is this possible?
Short to ground, bad wiring.

Sounds like your working on step 2
Step 2)This step tests the 12-volt reference circuit to the CKP sensor and the CMP sensor. The 12-volt reference circuit for the CKP sensor and the CMP sensor is connected internally within the ECM. If the 12-volt reference circuit is shorted to ground, the engine will not start and no engine speed will be indicated on the scan tool.
So it's clearly a fuel issue. Of some sort.
Wait a minute, this is all electrical.
Let's get back to fuel. Im done.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
So.. just an update.. trucks been at the stealership since Monday morning. They just called me to tell me they haven't found anything yet. And we're going to have to pull all the glow plugs to test for compression. Don't sound good. I might have a new motor and a divorce coming :banghead:
 

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Possible the station had gas at the diesel pump?
 
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