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2020 Chevy 2500HD LTZ Z71
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Discussion Starter #1
As we all read and post about different failures within the fuel delivery system, I can't help but try to sort all of this out in my mind. Although far from scientific (and really not well thought out), this is my gut first impression on what I think I'm seeing -


Injectors fail shortly after manufacture OR one or two at a time later in life. Seems 40-60K is where some start. Some fail over and over again after a good deal of mileage.


Fuel return lines seem to loosen and fill the crankcase with fuel. Although this is pretty bad, isn't this repair done (most of the time) by tightening up the affected lines? Hopefully this is caught before you run too long on diluted oil!


A few injection pumps here and there. Some right after manufacture, some later in life.


Regulator valves and such pretty much anytime. We have come to learn (through the trial and error of folks adding secondary filtration) that the factory fuel line connections can be suspect.


It has been touched on a few times by Eric and others that there may be a significant amount of misdiagnosis happening. How many pumps were really needed? Could the problem just have been the regulator, poor fuel line connections, etc? How many times have we heard of pumps and injectors being replaced at the same time? I wonder if any of those were a result of misdiagnosis. How many problems that require rework are caused by debris, improper seating, etc?


It has been suggested that we see more problems than the average because folks stumble upon us as they search for answers when they are having problems. That seems reasonable enough to me, but what I really wonder is how much of what is being repaired out there is actually faulty.


It would seem that the data we are seeing is not only skewed because of the nature of our medium, but it may be thrown way off by the inexperience of the tech community doing these repairs.


My intention is not to cast these techs in a bad light. They are doing what they can to fix these problems right the first time, I think it boils down to inexperience.


It appears that some of the design changes in the LLY will help reduce the chance of failing to locate the actual source of leaks and go a long way to stop debris contamination during assembly / disassembly.


I'll bet that five years from now we will see a clearer picture of the weak spots in the design of the FDS. It might not be near as bad as we see it now.


Kevin
 

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My pump was changed several thousand miles ago. It was definately bad. Parts of it were laying on top of the engine with fuel going everywhere. Engine was still running, though!
 

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2020 Chevy 2500HD LTZ Z71
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644 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Wow! I don't doubt some of these repairs are on the money, I just wonder about all of them. We have all read several times where injectors are replaced one or two at a time over several repairs in close succession. I really find it hard to believe they went bad like that. There has to be other issues at play. Or how about injectors on one repair, back again in a couple of weeks for fuel lines. What was missed there?


Kevin
 
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