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Ok, Im drivin down the road and it is 18 degrees outside. All of a sudden the truck shuts down and hasnt started again since. I figured the fuel gelled so I replaced the filters, bled the air out of the system and still nothing but crank,crank,crank...Wont hit at all! So I checked the glowplugs. They are still working ok. Have power to them and are gettin warm in the block. I also cracked the injector lines to verify that I was getting fuel and I am. Do I have a broken part in the pump? Timing issues with the pump? Or maybe elctrical? I do have power to the ignition module on the pump. Any help would be greatly appreciated because Id hate to think about havin to put a gas motor in so I can make our truck clubs next big trail ride.:eek::
 

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Welcome to the forum! :welcome:

It shut down without any warning, just like you turned the key off, right?

Did you try turning the ignition on and unhooking the pink wire that goes to the injection pump? You should unhook it and hook it back up a couple times... Every time you do so you should here a click.

There aren't too many things that will make one of these just shut right off... The injection pump shutoff solenoid is one thing... The injection pump itself is another under certain circumstances. If the solenoid was powered up and the pump is good the engine should run as long as the timing chain and gears are intact (and they just about never fail).

Hope this helps! Welcome again! :)
 

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thatd be my guess timing your pin couldave sheared on the cam and allowed it too rotate a few degrees and set the whole system outta wack

that there imo be a hard call but i would start with timing

you can pull your injector on # 1 and bring it too tdc then mark it on your hormonic ballancer with a reference point get a hard hose extension and put on the line and take it down too where your mark is and crank it if fuel comes out and hits the timed mark then it isnt your timing you need a very bright light for this and is only for static timing too make sure you are in the right area

its something small i came up with back in the day and it has never let me down as a trouble shooting tool
 

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High Sierra 2500;1589528; said:
Welcome to the forum! :welcome:

It shut down without any warning, just like you turned the key off, right?

Did you try turning the ignition on and unhooking the pink wire that goes to the injection pump? You should unhook it and hook it back up a couple times... Every time you do so you should here a click.

There aren't too many things that will make one of these just shut right off... The injection pump shutoff solenoid is one thing... The injection pump itself is another under certain circumstances. If the solenoid was powered up and the pump is good the engine should run as long as the timing chain and gears are intact (and they just about never fail).

Hope this helps! Welcome again! :)
ok I checked it all out and I have no clicks from the solenoid, I do have power up to that point though. What do I do from here? Is it a new injector pump or can I change that ESO solenoid? Is there any way around that thing or is it a must have? I appreciate the help! Im tired of watching videos of my truck running on my myspace page to remember what it sounded like:(

Missing the rumble of my 6.2
 

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been a long time but you can change it with some good instruction off of here. try a search on it. i don't want to leave out anything because if you don't get it together right it won't be pretty. i will let some one else tell you . i did mine along the highway without removing pump.
 

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Yeah, you can just replace the solenoid. You just pull the top cover off and replace the solenoid (it is bolted to the top cover).

The tricky part is getting the top cover installed properly. If you don't, there is a slight risk that the engine won't shut down after you fire it up, and also, as I recall, a risk that the engine will run away. The worst possible case is where both problems occur at once... In reality it isn't that difficult to install the cover, it's just rather important that you don't install it wrong.

Somebody else can probably do a better job of describing how the cover needs to go back on. It's hard to describe without pictures. There was a thread a while back that had pictures in it... I will see if I can find it. In my opinion, the best possible thing would be to watch carefully as the cover goes on and remember that, as noted in so many useless owner's manuals, "installation is the reverse of removal..." ):h
 

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Smoodymods;1589511; said:
Ok, Im drivin down the road and it is 18 degrees outside. All of a sudden the truck shuts down and hasnt started again since. I figured the fuel gelled so I replaced the filters, bled the air out of the system and still nothing but crank,crank,crank...Wont hit at all! So I checked the glowplugs. They are still working ok. Have power to them and are gettin warm in the block. I also cracked the injector lines to verify that I was getting fuel and I am. Do I have a broken part in the pump? Timing issues with the pump? Or maybe elctrical? I do have power to the ignition module on the pump. Any help would be greatly appreciated because Id hate to think about havin to put a gas motor in so I can make our truck clubs next big trail ride.:eek::
I'm not sure if you're the guy that contacted me yesterday or not - with the 6.2 that died running on WVO? I'll paste my reply here - just in case you are someone different with the same sort of problem.

Also, you dont' need the fuel-shut-off solenoid to test the pump. The solenoid pulls the pump into "off" position, a spring puts the pump into "on" position. So, if a solenoid goes bad - it will run and NOT shut off.

The pump has an intentional weak spot in its driveshaft that is supposed to work like a sort of "fuse." If the pump turns too hard, the shaft is supposed to snap in two - to prevent any other engine damage.
It sounds like you might of seized the head&rotor assembly and broke the shaft. If you did - there really isn't any cost-effective way to fix it. The head & rotor is the most expensive part of the pump and most pump shops will not give you any core-credit for a pump with a bad one.
Rotary pumps are the least reliable for waste-oil use. That does not mean they are bad - but - they cannot handle any mistakes with fuel being low lube or too thick. In-line pumps are much more durable but rare in U.S. built small diesels.
If you look at the pump from several places while the engine is cranking - you'll be able to see if the insides are turning or not. You can look in the triangle-shaped side-door, or pull the top cover off.
In regard to testing on the vehicle - if the injection pump is being delivered fuel, and it is turning, and the metering valve is open - it will pump fuel if it's working - period. The metering valve is what turns the fuel off or on. When the top cover in on the pump, a spring puts pressure against the valve and shuts if off. When you apply power, e.g. turn the key on, an electro-magnet over-rides that spring and lets the metering vavle open. So, if you have the top-cover off - it will automatically be "on." Keep that in mind, because - if you ever started the engine with the top off - you'd have no easy way to turn it off - unless you recognize the metering-valve and push against it with a screwdriver.
Also, you can just pull the cap off the back of the pump - to expose the little four-vaned transfer pump. It should turn whenever you crank the engine. If not, the shaft is broken.
 

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jdemaris;1598997; said:
Also, you dont' need the fuel-shut-off solenoid to test the pump. The solenoid pulls the pump into "off" position, a spring puts the pump into "on" position. So, if a solenoid goes bad - it will run and NOT shut off.
That wasn't what I meant to say - let me clarify - since I mixed my words up a bit. The solenoid does need to be working - for the engine to run - when it is installed. But, you can remove it - and run the engine without it - but you have to know what you are doing.

The solenoid - when energized - pulls a metal arm away from the metering-valve. Then a spring in the pump puts the injection pump in "run" position. When the solenoid loses power - the swing-arm - by spring pressure forces the pump into "off" position.

My point being, if you remove the entire top-cover along with the solenoid, the pump will be in "on" or "run" position.

I don't know if I've made that all clear of not - kind of hard to describe without a set of photos.
 
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