Diesel Place banner

1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Attached you will see pics of my current situation(82 chevy C20 6.2L). pic one is the fuel/water separator, pic 2 the bad location, and pic 3 is the secondary fuel filter I believe.

I guess my question is what are the steps to drain the water separator? (it looks like there is water in there) #2 Do Replace the filter at the top? or is there screen inside? Or nothing but draining it? #3 Replace secondary fuel filter? Any help and or the steps to properly do this would be greatly appreciated.

These all might be stupid questions but i am new to the diesel thing, not to mention im in a part of NJ that i can't really locate a diesel mech if something goes wrong or they only work on fleets/semi's. I own a landscape company and before this i had a gas engine. I mean i do do regular maintenance on my current 6.2 oil changes have been between 1500 - 2000 miles faithfully change air filter every 3 oil changes or so. Just never the fuel filter obviously lol...

Thanks all
Steve
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,412 Posts
Interesting...

Looks like you've got an aftermarket water separator there. I'm guessing that is a dedicated water separator. There should be a drain valve on the bowl somewhere or you might have to take the bowl off and empty it out. All you really need to do is get the water out of it. If there is a filter in there as well you will have to either clean it or replace it, but I doubt that that is anything but a water separator.

The Fram filter shown in the third pic is the secondary fuel filter. There should also be a primary filter on the firewall right by your air conditioning box on the righthand side, but it looks like your fuel system is slightly modified so that may not be there anymore. You should change the secondary filter (and the primary filter if it is still there)... Just remember that you should fill the filter with fuel before you install it and if you suspect that a lot of air got into the fuel lines you should bleed it out if you can. Airspace inside a diesel fuel system is bad (they don't run on air alone ):h ).

A good shop that will work on an automotive/light truck diesel (and actually fix it) is hard to find and when you do find one they usually charge a lot. Better off just fixing it yourself...

Hope this helps! :)
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top