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I am a newbie to this board and first time diesel owner, so take it easy on me. I recently purchased an '06 GMC Extended Cab 2500HD, and so far I am really impressed with this truck, compared to what I was driving, it is a Cadillac.

I am presently working 10 hr shifts and get off between 3-4 AM and my truck has to sit in an unprotected lot for 10-12 hrs. The temps are presently running in the low 20's & 30's and so far I have just started it up and let it idle till the temp comes up and not experienced any problems.

Is this the correct procedures or any suggestions?
 

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Theres gonna be a lot of opinions.I let my oil pressure come up and go.I just take it easy till the temp and trany temp come up.
 

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Sounds about right. Just don't run it too hard right off when you leave. Letting it idle for a bit before you leave will help warm up the engine but the trans, transfer-case, and diffs won't be warmed by it. They only really warm up once you have driven for a bit.
 

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get a auto start and then you don't have to worry but i just let my oil pressure come up too and take it easy on the truck till i get some temp in the engine
 

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Wait for the voltage guage to come up to normal (14V) and mossy down the road for the first ~5 miles and don't jump on it until the temp guage does it's first swing down from 195 and you should be good.

Going by your screen name I'm guessing you're in Texas? When you get a chance fill out your signature.
 

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Im in the minority it looks like but personally if my high idle kicks on I dont move till it kicks off. I also then mosy down the road 35-40 slow acceleration until the rear end transfer case oils have a chance to warm up usually about 2-3 miles (esp when 15 below and windchill like it has been). When above 32-50 usually 5 min. above 50 30 seconds.
 

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thejdman04;1585035; said:
Im in the minority it looks like but personally if my high idle kicks on I dont move till it kicks off. I also then mosy down the road 35-40 slow acceleration until the rear end transfer case oils have a chance to warm up usually about 2-3 miles (esp when 15 below and windchill like it has been). When above 32-50 usually 5 min. above 50 30 seconds.
I would have to venture that you're an old fart also because that's what I do also.It's much easier though lately as I now have my Astrostart thanks to Tony at MP.Didn't want to put to fine a point on it.:D
 

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rock_shoes;1584830; said:
Sounds about right. Just don't run it too hard right off when you leave. Letting it idle for a bit before you leave will help warm up the engine but the trans, transfer-case, and diffs won't be warmed by it. They only really warm up once you have driven for a bit.
Trans temp will rise if you let the truck idle long enough. My Edge shows that it will slowly warm up to 100, which is where the stock gauge starts moving.

I always let mine warm up for 10-15 minutes before taking off in cold weather.
 

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Get an auto start!!!! Best mod to truck yet!!!! Just take it easy untill everything comes up to temp. I'm not trying to beat a dead horse here guys.
 

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If it is cold enough for the fast idle to come on I let it do it's thing for about 5 minutes than drive easy at the speed limit. 20 to 30 degrees is not cold enough to waste fuel with a long idle time. If the fast idle doesn't come on after a minute I will drive easy until the temps come up. These motors have a fast idle for a reason. Low idle for more than a minute is just a waste of fuel. If you are towing then thats another story.
 

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[email protected];1585175; said:
I would have to venture that you're an old fart also because that's what I do also.It's much easier though lately as I now have my Astrostart thanks to Tony at MP.Didn't want to put to fine a point on it.:D
NO actually not an old fart at all but act like one.
 

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My after work routine lately has been to fire up the truck and let it high idle for a couple of minutes. After the oil pressure stabilizes between 80-90 psi I take off and drive it easy. After a couple of miles the engine is up to about 160* and I can tell the trans is warm because the shifter moves much easier. At 14*, rowing a shifter through Transynd feels like stirring peanut butter!
 

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Ben B;1585687; said:
Trans temp will rise if you let the truck idle long enough. My Edge shows that it will slowly warm up to 100, which is where the stock gauge starts moving.

I always let mine warm up for 10-15 minutes before taking off in cold weather.
Do only the newer edge/attitudes show trans temps? I have one that I bought in Nov '05 and it doesn't have that option.
 

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I couldn't tell ya... mine is a beta unit for the LBZ, and it had it.
 

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Warm up is a subjective discussion; sort of like "which stereo spearker is best" or "who's the best rock band ever". We all have oppinons. Your considerations should be specific for your criteria. With some of our input, you'll be able to decide for yourself what's "best".

I live in Indiana; it's cold in the winter and hot in the summer. I work 10 - 12 hours and get off at 0330 hours in the morning like you. I don't have much patience to wait around. In the winter, I start it up and idle just long enough to get out and scrape off windshield frost, and then drive away.

I read and read and read other forums, and vehicle and manufacturing trade magazines. I also worked in the automotive manufacturing industry (Ford) for 15 years. In general, the quicker you bring any type of equipment up to temp, the better, AS LONG AS YOU DO IT WITH REASONABLE MODERATION.

Internal combustion engines, of all types, best operatate in their designed temperature range. If you let your engine idle for long periods of time, you're wasting some small amount of fuel, and also contributing to a condition called "fuel dilution" of your engine oil. These are chronic conditions, not acute; in other word's, their accumulative over time, but certainly won't make the engine just quit. Diesel engines, especially when warm, waste less fuel and dilute less oil than gasoline engines, but they still do experience these phenomenon. The practice of letting your truck idle will not at all destroy your engine, but it's not as conducive to good operation as bringing the engine and other drive train components up to temperatue as a group with reasonable, moderate driving.

So the question to you is, does it matter to you how much fuel you "waste" while sitting? It's probably just pennies, in reality. Do you care about your engine oil? With routine maintenance, it's not a huge concern; most people change their oil way before it's truly ready for a change. How much is your time worth, just waiting for a piece of equipment to warm up? After a 12 hour day, I'm not at all interested in sitting in the parking lot at work. I do occasionally use the "high idle" feature on my Duramax, and I certainly enjoy the benefit of a warm cab, but that's a matter of convenience, not necessity. The same applies to you, I expect.

So do what you're comfortable with. Neither decision is wrong, but only one is right for you.
 

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Im in the minority it looks like but personally if my high idle kicks on I dont move till it kicks off.
LOL..mine ran on high idle for 15 minutes the other day and it still didn't get the engine temp high enough to shut it off...with a weather front too.

20 to 30 degrees is not that cold. If it was that warm here I would drive it with less than 5 minutes warm up time. Less if I had side roads to warm it up on.
 

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dnewton3;1642787; said:
Warm up is a subjective discussion; sort of like "which stereo spearker is best" or "who's the best rock band ever". We all have oppinons. Your considerations should be specific for your criteria. With some of our input, you'll be able to decide for yourself what's "best".

I live in Indiana; it's cold in the winter and hot in the summer. I work 10 - 12 hours and get off at 0330 hours in the morning like you. I don't have much patience to wait around. In the winter, I start it up and idle just long enough to get out and scrape off windshield frost, and then drive away.

I read and read and read other forums, and vehicle and manufacturing trade magazines. I also worked in the automotive manufacturing industry (Ford) for 15 years. In general, the quicker you bring any type of equipment up to temp, the better, AS LONG AS YOU DO IT WITH REASONABLE MODERATION.

Internal combustion engines, of all types, best operatate in their designed temperature range. If you let your engine idle for long periods of time, you're wasting some small amount of fuel, and also contributing to a condition called "fuel dilution" of your engine oil. These are chronic conditions, not acute; in other word's, their accumulative over time, but certainly won't make the engine just quit. Diesel engines, especially when warm, waste less fuel and dilute less oil than gasoline engines, but they still do experience these phenomenon. The practice of letting your truck idle will not at all destroy your engine, but it's not as conducive to good operation as bringing the engine and other drive train components up to temperatue as a group with reasonable, moderate driving.

So the question to you is, does it matter to you how much fuel you "waste" while sitting? It's probably just pennies, in reality. Do you care about your engine oil? With routine maintenance, it's not a huge concern; most people change their oil way before it's truly ready for a change. How much is your time worth, just waiting for a piece of equipment to warm up? After a 12 hour day, I'm not at all interested in sitting in the parking lot at work. I do occasionally use the "high idle" feature on my Duramax, and I certainly enjoy the benefit of a warm cab, but that's a matter of convenience, not necessity. The same applies to you, I expect.

So do what you're comfortable with. Neither decision is wrong, but only one is right for you.
Thats a much better first post than most people's. Welcome to the site.
 

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Schulte - thanks, and thanks.
 
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