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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
the guy I bought the blazer from rebuilt the motor installed it put some ratty looking old IP pump on it that is non opp, but never finished hooking the rest of the engine components up or running it, then it sat for years,

I'm in the process of removing the Ip and I noticed he did not use valve cover gaskets he just used silicone on the valve covers with no gaskets! and then
tightend the covers all the way down to where the bolts are real tight, like way tighter then you normally tighten valve cover bolts,

Is this a acceptable way of installing valve covers? or should I take them off and use gaskets?

just wondering if anyone else does it this way with good results,

thanks in advance

vx
 

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i siliconed mine
 

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when i replaced my head gaskets i installed new valve cover gaskets. they were siliconed before the repair. seemed to work fine.

if you install new gaskets you need to remove all the old silicone. it kinda a PINA. if the valve cover was tightened too much before the silicone set i'm willing to bet they will leak.
 

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I used a cork gasket and a little bit of silicone.
 

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The army seems to really like the black RTF silicon in place of valve cover gaskets. My surplus 6.2's use it heavily! It seems to work, I don't see any evidence of leaks.
 

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Use gaskets or silicone, but dont mix the two or you'll have a bigger leak than before you started.Use some 3m weatherstrip adhesive and glue the new gaskets to the clean,silicone free valve covers.Clean all silicone, grease and dirt from cilynder head and wipe dry with a towel and brake clean. Also make sure that the mounting holes on the covers are flat, this will cause more problems than anything.
 

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i use the hightack in the tube for when i did the oil pan gasket on my 6.2
 

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black RTV works great for me...
 

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Either way works fine, but in either case it is important not to overtighten the bolt that hold the cover down. Sealants tend to be more tolerant of over/undertightening than gaskets, but either way it is best to just tighten the bolts tight enough to stop the leaks. With sealants you need to be very careful not to use too much "goop" as it squeezes out when you tighten the covers down. The excess then ends up in the engine, probably floating around looking for a neat oil passage to block. This tends to be more of an issue on small engines but you still need to be careful.

In this case? I wouldn't touch it unless it leaks... ;)
 

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I use Permatex "Ultra-Copper" or "Ultra-Gray" rather than black stuff. The temp rating is higher and they're more impervious to fuel, oil, solvents, etc., than the black.

The trick to sealers is a clean, dry surface and don't allow the sealer to dry before you install the part. Once installed, for extra protection against leaks, allow the sealer to cure for 24 hrs prior to running the engine.

In the business, often it's necessary to "get the vehicle out the door, the customer is waiting!" I've had better luck with the afore-mentioned Ultra-Copper, if I have to start and run the vehicle before the sealer has a chance to fully cure.
 

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I usually first scrape off the gasket surface, then I spray down the surfaces with brake cleaner before I either install a gasket or apply a sealer. Cleans the oil and stuff off and leaves a nice dry surface in just a minute or so. Always works for me...
 

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Right on, High Sierra, me too! I don't use carb clean, leaves a residue. Some of the newer brake clean products aren't as good as the earlier ones either. Stuff keeps changing and I'm old, I wish they'd just leave stuff alone! :D
 
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