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Discussion Starter #1
I am looking at getting a trailer for my business and was wandering if a v-nose enclosed trailer makes any difference while towing over a flat front trailer. Some say the v should be in the back like an airplane just wandering what experience and input you all have on the subject.
 

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I have a flat front enclosed 18ft, and wish it was a v-nose. I would have never thought the wind drag would be that bad. If your speeds are kept around the speed limit, its not bad, but when you start haulin arse, you can feel it, plus see the fuel gauge drop quicker.

I would assume the v-nose would be alot better with the wind drag, but i have not towed one to compare. My next enclosed will be a v-nose.
 

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I have a 28' flat nose trailer and it is a beast. Truck pulls it no problem but a "V" nose would cut through the wind much better. On the inside, I like the flat nose for cabinets etc. .

 

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A V-nose makes a dramatic difference, especially when bucking a head wind. It will reduce your drag coefficient by 75%.
 

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I have a 7X16 Horton V-nose. Can't tell you much as I've only pulled it about 20 miles home and parked.


 

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V-nose in front helps a lot. A V or spherical tail would help a lot as well, but would be a little inconvenient unless you had some trick engineering on it.
 

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I sold a 16ft flat nose and bought a 26ft v nose and have since decided I will never go back to a flat nose. It is night and day different Especially in a head wind, It pulls easier than the shorter lighter trailer with better mileage to boot.:)
 

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I also have a v-nose, pull it all over the place through the summer, goes nice through a head wind without killing your mileage to...best part of it is that I can throw my brothers buggy in the front all the way since the tires start about 12" from the nose, depending what your going to use it for i say get one
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you for the responce I was wandering if anybody else had more to share on the subject??
 

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Go to HHtrailer.com they have quite a write up on the differences between the two. "Real world testing" I have a flat nose 16' and my business partner has a 16' V nose and honestly I've pulled both and can't tell a difference. You do get a little more room in front with a "V" though.

Nate
 

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Moving to Truck Uses.
 

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I've noticed a big difference with just a bubble on the front. might be a happy middle point. I've never pulled a v-nose though so it might a lot better, I don't know.
 

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The 24' Vee nose I had was fine unlees you were in croos winds, then the Vee tried to push you all over. I would not buy one again. Now a bubble on the nose, that sounds like a plan....
 

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I have a 32 Foot Featherlite All-Aluminum V-Nose Snowmobile Trailer, and it pulls just awesome. We don't even use sway-bars when we tow it. But what do you expect, it's got a Duramax on the front end! I'll post pics later.
 

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The V on the front of a trailer does nothing as far as cutting threw the wind, and reducing fuel consumption.
 

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dmaxlover;1616551; said:
The V on the front of a trailer does nothing as far as cutting threw the wind, and reducing fuel consumption.
I'm assuming your rational is due to the increase in area on the front created by the vee? I was wondering if this had some validity to it. While it might "cut" through the air, it still has SUBSTANTIALLY more area being hit directly by the air. Is this the right thinking?

The above methodology doesn't exactly make since though. For instance, take the common garden variety pointed bullet or football shape. It has a LOT more area being hit yet it clearly can go through the air a lot better

So, now I have started an argument with myself. :D There is some validity in the wedge or spherical shapes being able to "cut" through the air better inspite of a greater surface contact area. I suppose the (assumed) increased frictional resistance due to more surface area is, or could be, less than the benefit of the aerodynamics and airflow around the object. In this case, the front of the trailer.


I hate when I can argue both sides of my own questions with sound rational that make sense yet one is clearly wrong. :rolleyes:
 

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SmokeShow;1622679; said:
...So, now I have started an argument with myself. :D ...

...I hate when I can argue both sides of my own questions with sound rational that make sense yet one is clearly wrong. :rolleyes:
Don't worry about, it happens to me all the time.

This is actually a good question. Aerodynamic drag is proportional to a drag coefficient constant, area and speed. Ignore speed because they are the same. Area brings a few things into play.

Like you alluded to area could be construed a couple ways. If just frontal area, then a wedge and a square-front of the same width are going to have the same frontal area no matter what. But surface areas are definitely different.

The best answer I've come up with is to split overall drag into two things, pressure drag and viscous drag. Pressure drag roughly equates to the force it takes to physically move the fluid out of the way so the object can occupy that same space. Viscous drag comes from the contact with the fluid and the surface moving through the fluid.

Pressure drag is only dependent on frontal area, no matter the shape the same amount of fluid has to be pushed out of the way to allow a similar sized object to move through it. Viscous drag is dependent on surface area. So for pressure drag, the two trailer types are the same, and for viscous drag, the wedge shape loses out. So as far as area is concerned, the flat-nose is probably better.

But that brings us to the coefficient of drag. The only way to know this factor is to put something in a wind tunnel and actually measure it. So in comparing the two trailer types, we have to just take an educated guess and say the wedge almost certainly has a lower coefficient of drag. Is it enough to overcome the added viscous drag, though? My gut feeling is yes it is, but I don't know of a way to prove it without testing it.
 

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SmokeShow;1622679; said:
I'm assuming your rational is due to the increase in area on the front created by the vee? I was wondering if this had some validity to it. While it might "cut" through the air, it still has SUBSTANTIALLY more area being hit directly by the air. Is this the right thinking?

The above methodology doesn't exactly make since though. For instance, take the common garden variety pointed bullet or football shape. It has a LOT more area being hit yet it clearly can go through the air a lot better

So, now I have started an argument with myself. :D There is some validity in the wedge or spherical shapes being able to "cut" through the air better inspite of a greater surface contact area. I suppose the (assumed) increased frictional resistance due to more surface area is, or could be, less than the benefit of the aerodynamics and airflow around the object. In this case, the front of the trailer.


I hate when I can argue both sides of my own questions with sound rational that make sense yet one is clearly wrong. :rolleyes:
Basically with my 18' long, 102" wide, and 6-1/2' ceiling height, v-nose snowmobile trailer pulling at 75 mph I get about 10.5 mpg with the stock turbo and an 80 horse tune. I can't imagine mileage would get any worse with a flat nose trailer.

I believe a ton of the drag on a trailer type like mine comes from the bottom of the trailer and because it's so high off the ground.
 

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I've seen various types of V-noses. With any of them, you have to be careful if you ever want to use weight distribution bars--the enclosed coupler takes away your mounting points. If you custom order your trailer, the manufacturer might be able to add some WD mount points to your V-nose, but if you're buying from stock, buyer beware!

Here are some photos from ATC:

"small V"
http://www.aluminumtrailer.com/catalog/images/2_foot_wedge.jpg

"big V"
http://www.aluminumtrailer.com/catalog/images/4_foot_wedge.jpg

"WD prep"
http://www.aluminumtrailer.com/catalog/images/weight_distrubtion_prep_includes_hangers.jpg
 
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