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Discussion Starter #1
Hey, guys like usual asking more dumb questions. I ordered a HX40II kit for the old Ted's pull that I am replacing my blown 93 DB2 engine. So far everything has pretty much bolted up, but I'm getting ready to install the oil return port and line connection to the lower block and I found something different in there (unlike the 93), it seems there is a sliding piston of some sort. Totally different than my 93. I've enclosed some pictures for your reference:

The first - when I opened the return plate on the doner engine.
The second - The plate to the right is from the 93 engine (no piston) the new turbo charger kit plate loosely installed
The third - The plate from the (doner engine) 2004 Humvee engine (you can see where the piston rests on it).
Last - The new kit plate installed, and you can see where the piston rests in relation to the new port.

My first question is. What does this piston do?
Will the new plate interfere in what it is supposed to be doing? To my untrained eye, I don't see a problem, but from experience, it wouldn't be the first time an unseen problem ran right over me.

Thanks for your advice. :)
 

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that is the rod from a mechanical lift pump. Just take it out and use your old plate and you will be all good.... read you post6 closer. Use your new plate if you are going to the AN fittings, whatever you do you want that rod out. the original had a mechanical pump and where the hole in that plate was stuck an arm that would get pushed by the rod from the cam and supply fuel to the ip. Turbos... if it was a turbo (do you know if it was a turbo??? ) were in the back and their return line was in the rear of the valley iirc.
 

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that is the rod from a mechanical lift pump. Just take it out and use your old plate and you will be all good.... read you post6 closer. Use your new plate if you are going to the AN fittings, whatever you do you want that rod out. the original had a mechanical pump and where the hole in that plate was stuck an arm that would get pushed by the rod from the cam and supply fuel to the ip. Turbos... if it was a turbo (do you know if it was a turbo??? ) were in the back and their return line was in the rear of the valley iirc.
Thanks cruzer, all I know from the serial number is that the engine was built 2004, and that it was removed from a military Humvee. The plate that came with it was in the third picture, maybe when they disassembled the humvees they pulled a rocker arm out of there that was part of the lift pump. That's interesting, I'll plan on doing just what you said and remove the piston or push rod. I am assuming it will slide right out! Thanks again for the info. :)
 

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no rocker, just a big lobe in front of the rest on the camshaft. You may want to somehow figure out if it was a turbo or not before you throw your turbo setup on there. Pistons are different maybe. Anodized coating on the turbo pistons so from what I read you may need to keep the egt down a bit more and also check out the injectors as turbo and non are set to different pressures as well. Was there any evidence of a turbo being installed near the rear/center of the block?
 

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no rocker, just a big lobe in front of the rest on the camshaft. You may want to somehow figure out if it was a turbo or not before you throw your turbo setup on there. Pistons are different maybe. Anodized coating on the turbo pistons so from what I read you may need to keep the egt down a bit more and also check out the injectors as turbo and non are set to different pressures as well. Was there any evidence of a turbo being installed near the rear/center of the block?
I thought all the military humvees were turbo. I had all the injectors tested and cleaned by the shop that rebuilt the DB2 for me, I was going to have that shop overhaul the GMx turbo as well. As we discussed many aspects of the turbo charging and how to keep temperatures down, so I assume that we would have broached the subject if the injectors were non turbo. The pistons do appear(I am not absolutely sure) to have a coating. I noticed this during ARP stud install. It is an 2004 AMG engine with 506 block?
 

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the turbo pistons are dark in the center with a small ~3/16 brighter aluminum ring at the outside looking from the top. The non turbo ones are an even finish over the entire top.... I dont know about that specific year but there were certainly non turbo hummers out there.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
the turbo pistons are dark in the center with a small ~3/16 brighter aluminum ring at the outside looking from the top. The non turbo ones are an even finish over the entire top.... I dont know about that specific year but there were certainly non turbo hummers out there.
I was thinking back to when I bought it and sure I remember the tech asked me what year engine I was replacing and where the turbo charger mounted, either center mount or right side. Anyway, I'm going to cross my fingers and let fly. I'm past the point of removing the heads again. I will be mounting a pyrometer and will make sure I keep the sucker well below 1200. I'm not using anymore boost than standard even with the larger turbo and will be babying this one.
The engine is going into the rear of a class a RV. If it comes apart I'll probably Thelma and Louise it! :D
 

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Many of the military engines were center mount turbos but had mechanical IP's.
So they used a mechanical lift pump where the turbo oil drain is.
The turbo oil drain on these was at the rear of the engine where the turbo bolted down.
If you have those feed and drain holes you need to plug them.
Non turbo military 6.5's do not have those oil ports or they have a cover.
Some of the military 6.5 combinations were military only.
 

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Many of the military engines were center mount turbos but had mechanical IP's.
So they used a mechanical lift pump where the turbo oil drain is.
The turbo oil drain on these was at the rear of the engine where the turbo bolted down.
If you have those feed and drain holes you need to plug them.
Non turbo military 6.5's do not have those oil ports or they have a cover.
Some of the military 6.5 combinations were military only.
Thanks Glagulator, it does have that mechnical lift pump, and the cover to it had an opening on top. In the third picture, the cover that came with this pull is the one on the right showing the inside of the cover. There is a large mastly retangular hole in the upper part of it. This cover is in the front right of the engine on the lower case, now that you metion it I had to take out a plug on the front to access an oil feed for the turbo. Of course the engine came without any intake or exhaust manifolds (it was pretty much just a long block). There was no engine speed sensor above the oil pump drive. That hole had tape over it. Could they have used that hole for the turbo? There may be an extra connection down by the oil filter, I'll be checking there.
I've been having this discussion with Cruzer747 and I'm beginning to wonder if it indeed was a turbo engine. In the event it isn't, what type of operational considerations should I have or expect using a turbo on a non turbo engine?:(
 

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This is a center mount turbo block.
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