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Discussion Starter #1
with the weather being in the double digit negatives all next week when i cant plug in my truck (while at school or work) is it all right to let it idle for extended periods of time or should i jsut go start it and let in run for 10 mins every few hours? just wondering cause i know its not the greatest to let them idle for along time
 

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Where are you located at?

Idling for extended periods is alot better than starting it up and shutting it off every few hours. Thats more wear and tear on the engine than idling alone.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
right in the heart of wisconsin it was cold enough to freeze the fuel up this morning even with a bunch of power service in the tank i dunno about this cold
 

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Surf over to Keneddy's site for instructions to do the fast idle modification - may even be info in FAQ's here, with pics

Just remember - idling is ZERO mpg...............
 

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Discussion Starter #5
im not so worried about keep it toasty warm for me thats no big deal, its just so cold im worried about damaging the motor with all these cold starts there so hard on it, and i cant plug it in at school the motor is ice cold after less than 2 hours
 

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Usually I take a bus to work.

Occasionally I will take the truck if I have errands or other such reasons to drive.

I have no place to plug in, and have no trouble whatsoever to start my truck at -20C.

Good batteries and associated connections, starter, glow plugs and such and it stars in 3 crank revs or less, (as opposed to about 1/2 if warm or plugged in).

A truck not running burns 0 fuel, none, notabit. I wouldn't consider leaving my truck running for a day of work, school, a swimming lesson or anything else.

Double digit negatives is cold. When I fish at those temps, I like to start and warm up every 4 or 5 hours or so, for about 10 minutes.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
truck starts great no complaints on that its a small city no public transportaion i could let it run all day and it'd be lots cheaper than a taxi
 

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Yeah, but lots more expensive than starter bearings and brushes, I'd wager.
 

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I would bet there is an outside plug somewhere at school:D
 

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I don't know what is best, it is different for everyone. I let my 6.2's run for a week at a time when the temps stayed below -20 degrees. I filled one night on my way home and then again on my way to work, it cost $4.00 that night. The pickup ran until 420,000+ miles when the front suspension gave up. The van went past 150,00 when I sold it. These were trucks in the 80's that didn't start as good as yours, but it worked for me.
 

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How'd '80's fuel prices compare with now?
 

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Seriously, tho - really wish we could still run one all nite for 4 bucks.

Gone are the days................
 

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GMCTD, i might have taken this the wrong way but you suggested adding a high idle switch for long idling periods. Wouldnt that use more fuel or am i missing someing. Does the high idle use more or less fuel is my main question?
 

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No, you're correct - fast idle will use more fuel.

However, if a Diesel engine is idled for long periods of time, the injected fuel will chill and condense, lowering combustion temperatures, with ultimate wash-down of the cylinder walls, resulting in scuffed walls.

High-pressure liquid sprayed into a lower pressure area creates the wondermous function of air conditioning - works the same in the Diesel engine cylinders.

So, switching engine idle to increased rpm keeps the heat up, at the cost of increased fuel consumption.

High idle is mainly used to power hydraulic pumps, winches, and other things connected to the Power Take Off on the transmission or transfer case

Hope this clears up your consternation,....er........one hump, or two?
 

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You can buy a car starter(CompuStar), delay starts for diesels, that auto starts when it drops to curtain temperatures, auto runs from 15 to 45 minutes for diesels.
 

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gmctd;1571781; said:
No, you're correct - fast idle will use more fuel.

However, if a Diesel engine is idled for long periods of time, the injected fuel will chill and condense, lowering combustion temperatures, with ultimate wash-down of the cylinder walls, resulting in scuffed walls.

High-pressure liquid sprayed into a lower pressure area creates the wondermous function of air conditioning - works the same in the Diesel engine cylinders.
Probably doesn't have time to condense, run out of the prechamber and down the piston to scuff the walls.

In a DuraBux it would simply condense in the bowl of the piston, never to reach the walls?
 

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Remote start might be the way to go. Besides the obvious advantage of starting while inside, it has both timer and temp features. If set to timer it will start the engine every 3-6 hours (programable) for 12,24,60 minutes...for an overall time period of 18 hours, in other words, if set to 3 hour starts, you get a start at 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 and finally the 18th hour. The temp feature also uses an 18 hour time limit. When the temp in the cab reaches 32 degrees it will start for the programmed amount of time (12,24,60) and and cycle as needed for that 18 hour period.

Also has a turbo timer and other groovy features built in.

Its a Clifford RSX 3.5, same as the Viper 791XV, about $200 online, 1/4 mile range.
 

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Fuel is not injected IN the pre-combustion chamber - it is injected thru the 'chamber directly into the cylinder.

The spray pattern is down across the glow plug thru the port and into the cylinder - hi temp air is swirled thru the 'chamber, where combustion starts, all things being equal.

Combustion is completed in the cylinder - cold weather idling, where in-tank fuel temps are ambient-equal, cylinder temps are ambient-cooled, intake air is ambient-equal, can result in lower cylinder temps, with resulting white vapor, which is condensing fuel.

Condensing fuel has a tendency to wash anything it is in contact with.

The symptom is more apt to occur in direct-injected engines, but will occur in the IDI engines in cold winter ambients.

Lite-duty Diesel trucks are not as apt to be long-idled as the med- and heavy-duty versions.

Fast-idle keeps engine temperatures up, preventing cylinder-wall scuffing - if your air filter is clean.
 

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gmctd;1574496; said:
Fuel is not injected IN the pre-combustion chamber - it is injected thru the 'chamber directly into the cylinder.

The spray pattern is down across the glow plug thru the port and into the cylinder - hi temp air is swirled thru the 'chamber, where combustion starts, all things being equal.
mmmmmm....

It would have to be a fairly narrow stream out of the injector then. Is atomization realized by scattering off the top of the piston then?
 
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