Diesel Place banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Supporting Vendor
Joined
·
1,240 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)


We frequently see questions regarding TPMS rebuild kits so we decided to put this post together to help answer some of those questions.

First, a brief overview on the two types of TPMS systems (indirect and direct) that are found on today's TPMS equipped vehicles.


Indirect TPMS

  • An indirect TPMS system measures tire pressure from the rate of tire revolution via the wheel speed sensors that the anti-lock brake system uses.
Direct TPMS

  • A direct TPMS system utilizes a pressure monitoring sensor within each tire/ wheel assembly that transmits tire pressure to the TPMS control module. It is this system, which is also the most common, that need TPMS rebuild kits.

What is a TPMS rebuild kit?

A TPMS rebuild kit contains all of the necessary components to rebuild the valve portion of the TPMS sensor of either a metal or rubber sensor. The actual sensor portion is not serviceable and goes untouched.


What's the difference between a metal sensor and a rubber sensor?

The difference is the type of valve used. Metal sensors utilize a rubber grommet and retaining nut as well as a rubber seal on the valve core. A rubber sensor utilizes a rubber valve stem and a rubber seal on the valve core. Here's a picture to better illustrate:




What is the difference between a metal sensor and a rubber sensor rebuild kit?

The difference is the included valve components. Here's an exploded view to illustrate:




When do I need to purchase a rebuild kit?

Rebuilding the valve portion of the TPMS sensor ensures an air tight seal and reduces the chance of early sensor replacement due to normal wear or corrosion. We recommend a new rebuild kit anytime the sensor is removed from the wheel and when signs of wear or corrosion are present.


What does a TPMS rebuild kit cost?

Prices range anywhere from $3.00 to $14.00 depending on the manufacturer and type of sensor. TPMS rebuild kits are sold per sensor (4 sensors would need 4 rebuild kits).


How do I know which rebuild kit I need for my vehicle?

To determine which rebuild kit is correct for your vehicle, you'll need to look at the valve stem that's currently installed. If it's rubber, you'll need the rubber valve stem rebuild kit. If it's metal, you'll need the metal one.


We hope this information provides you with the knowledge necessary to keep your TPMS sensors functional and your vehicle running safe down the road. If you have further questions regarding TPMS rebuild kits, feel free to ask them here or contact your local Discount Tire.

For more information on TPMS and other tire and wheel related topics, please visit our Information Center.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,300 Posts
When do I need to purchase a rebuild kit?

Rebuilding the valve portion of the TPMS sensor ensures an air tight seal and reduces the chance of early sensor replacement due to normal wear or corrosion. We recommend a new rebuild kit anytime the sensor is removed from the wheel.




When would the sensor be removed from the wheel? Is it removed when changing tires? Can it be left in place when changing tires so that it does not need to be rebuilt?
 

·
Supporting Vendor
Joined
·
1,240 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
When would the sensor be removed from the wheel? Is it removed when changing tires? Can it be left in place when changing tires so that it does not need to be rebuilt?
The sensors should be removed and inspected anytime the tires are changed. In-fact, the valve portion should be inspected periodically for corrosion and wear. If corrosion or wear is present, the sensors should be rebuilt, even if the tires are not in need of changing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,300 Posts
The sensors should be removed and inspected anytime the tires are changed. In-fact, the valve portion should be inspected periodically for corrosion and wear. If corrosion or wear is present, the sensors should be rebuilt, even if the tires are not in need of changing.
Thank you. I argued with a Discount Store employee recently over this. They were replacing tires on a 2.5 year old car that operates solely in the Vegas desert. He insisted that I MUST rebuild the valves. Even argued with me on it saying they will leak. I said, "Not if you don't damage them when you're changing the tires. They're only 2.5 years old (22,000 miles)! If they aren't leaking now why would they leak after you change the tires?"

I was going off what my local Sam's Club tire guy had told me. And what do ya know, 6 months later and not leaking / malfunctioning. Now had the tires had 5 years or so or been in snow and sleet (corrosion), I may be concerned. But I'm betting it's just easier (and more profitable) to just cut the valves off to deflate tires.
 

·
Supporting Vendor
Joined
·
1,240 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Thank you. I argued with a Discount Store employee recently over this. They were replacing tires on a 2.5 year old car that operates solely in the Vegas desert. He insisted that I MUST rebuild the valves. Even argued with me on it saying they will leak. I said, "Not if you don't damage them when you're changing the tires. They're only 2.5 years old (22,000 miles)! If they aren't leaking now why would they leak after you change the tires?"

I was going off what my local Sam's Club tire guy had told me. And what do ya know, 6 months later and not leaking / malfunctioning. Now had the tires had 5 years or so or been in snow and sleet (corrosion), I may be concerned. But I'm betting it's just easier (and more profitable) to just cut the valves off to deflate tires.
I'm sorry to hear there was a breakdown in communication with regard to the rebuild kit. The rubber components (grommet, valve, seal, etc) within the valve portion break down and weather, especially with heat, which is likely why the rebuild kit was recommended.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,300 Posts
I'm sorry to hear there was an argument and breakdown in communication with regard to the rebuild kit. The rubber components (grommet, valve, seal, etc) within the valve portion break down and weather, especially with heat, which is likely why the rebuild kit was recommended.
Thanks. The bad part about that was that the actual store manager that I had set & written all this up with, and who said "no need to mess with the tpms" was on break when I came in for the tire swap. It was his underling that gave me grief, making a big deal out if it. But honestly, there's always one. He's just an employee and I won't lose faith in the company over one guy.

I typically replace my valves when I typically replace my tires which is typically every 4 to 5 years. This was bad rubber on OEM tires that required replacement after only 2.5 years / 22K.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,863 Posts
With over 40 tpms equipped vehicles, I tend to argue the other way. 75% of my "I have to keep adding air" complaints are due to stem leakage. At minimum, they should be " repaired", with a seal kit, every other tire set. Problem is that those with the metal stem are usually corroded beyond repair by the third set of tires. I usually get 32k on my LT tire equipped trucks.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top