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Ok guys, probably beating a dead horse to death and I have been sifting through searched topics for an hour or so.

I have a 2007.5 LMM CC/SB 4WD. What is my trucks actual weight (or average) vs the GVWR? This will dictate my cargo rating or pin weight capacity, right? Also, what is the max weight I can pull for a 5th wheel? I just read confliciting info between here and the owner's manual, which isn't very clear. I've heard 15,400 and 14,200. Reason I'm asking is that I'm looking to upgrade the 5'er and want to go a little bigger. Thanks in advance.
 

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The tow weight is very clear...check the manual, all you get here is opinions. As for the actual weight of your truck...get the cargo capacity off the Tire and Loading Information sticker located on the left rear door or door post. Subtract that weight from your GVWR of 9200 and you'll have your truck weight. Your cargo capacity will only be around 23/2400.
 

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ABQ:

I have always taken my truck(s) with full fuel, normal gear and me, and weighed them. That also lets you know what weight is actually resting on each axle. That way, if you hook up a trailer and weigh, you'll see the change in your front, the change in your rear, and also get the weight of the empty trailer.

Transfer also has a lot to do with no only, of course, the weight of your trailer, but also the placement of its forward-most axle. The distance between your drive axle on the truck and that forward axle on the trailer is the bridge. The further aft the trailer axles, the more weight transfers to the pin.

Also, having the empty weight of your truck, and then your truck/trailer combo, will tell you how much added weight (gear, etc) & cargo you can put in the trailer.

The rear axle on your truck has a rating, as do the tires. For fun, your decal should list the rear axle rating. Add up your two rear tire ratings and see how that reflects against the axle rating. You are only as good as your weakest link.

So, if you weigh your truck, and you know that the rear axle is rated for, say 7,000# and the unladen rear axle weight is, say, 5800#, that allows 1,200# for either cargo, or pin weight. Your pin will transfer a smaller portion to your front axle, and the larger portion to your rear axle (closest to the pin - makes sense). On my one ton hooked up to my 25', it was 19% to the rear, 6% to the front, just as an example.

So, even if you allowed for a 25% transfer ALL to the REAR, and you knew you had 1,200# "available" in my "example", you could have a 4,800# trailer. 4,800# less 25% to the pin = 3,600 on the trailer axles. This is just an example, not indicative of your truck or any trailer weights. etc. But say the transfer, due to axle placement, was only 15%.
Now your trailer can weigh in at 8,000#, less 15% to the truck (1,200#) leaves 6,800# on the trailer axles/tires. So a lot can change due to the ACTUAL transfer, and the only way I know to determine the ACTUAL transfer is to weigh the truck, then weigh the truck & trailer.

If you determine what capacity you could have and be within your ratings, and you felt confident enough in what some sale person represented as the transfer, and felt that was within your rating, then I guess you write the check.
 
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