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2008 Duramax 3500 Crewcab single rear wheels
I am looking at getting a 3 car wedge trailer gooseneck. I am not sure what it is rated for, but it has three axles on it. What is my truck rated to pull? Am I going to get stopped for not having duals? This is for personal use, am I going to have to cross scales, or get a CDL?I am in NV but plan on going through ID into OR to get it.
 

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I believe your GVW is 9900, so unless you're hauling 3 Smart cars you are likely to be overweight.
 

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I believe your GVW is 9900, so unless you're hauling 3 Smart cars you are likely to be overweight.
Not so fast, there. The GCWR of his rig is 22,000#; max 5er trailer weight is 14,900# (2wd) 14,600# (4wd)

If I remember right, those trailers are around 14,000GVW with a tare of 4,000# or so.

Looking at the numbers, it should not be a problem.

As for the CDL issue: each state is different. Check out the regs online; I'm sure your state has them online.
 

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Check all the states that you might run in. In CA if the trailer has a 10,001 weight rating or over you need CDL.
 

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Check all the states that you might run in. In CA if the trailer has a 10,001 weight rating or over you need CDL.

I think that is with a tag trailer. I think 15000 on a fiver/goose
 

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If you're hauling your own personal stuff, you don't need the CDL according to Federal DOT regs.
 

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If you're hauling your own personal stuff, you don't need the CDL according to Federal DOT regs.
You have to abide by DOT and State law, whichever is more stringent will apply.
 

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If I remember right, those trailers are around 14,000GVW with a tare of 4,000# or so.

Looking at the numbers, it should not be a problem.

Better research those numbers again, they are low.:)
 

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I haul cars for a living and here in Florida the DOT manual states, a CDL is not needed unless the GVW is over 26,000 lbs. I have a two car trailer so I'm under that, and don't have a CDL. I still have to keep a Drivers Log (can not drive more that 11 hours in a 14 hour period) and have to stop in weight stations. I also am subject to DOT inspections both at weight stations and on road spot checks. I have to have a DOT medical card. I drive in many states so I had to get a DOT number and a MC number to travel interstate. However if it is not a commerical vehicle, you don't have to comply with any of this or stop in weight stations. You can't have any signs on the tow vehicle. But you better have all your saftey equitment (fire ext. , saftey reflective triangles, spare fuses and small bulbs) with you cause DOT can still stop you. And when they see a three car hauler without any commerical markings.. you can be sure they are going to be wondering why it has no DOT number and will target that vehicle for inspection. As far as a single rear wheel tow vehicle... Check the owners manual for its capabilty, but remeber the truck is only as good as the tires carrying the weight. Those two rear tires are going to be working at their limit with that much weight and side to side load. Turning puts a load on the sidewalls. How about a blowout on a rear tire when loaded?? I like the piece of mind with the dually.
Hope some of this was helpful, Don
 

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I haul cars for a living and here in Florida the DOT manual states, a CDL is not needed unless the GVW is over 26,000 lbs. I have a two car trailer so I'm under that, and don't have a CDL. I still have to keep a Drivers Log (can not drive more that 11 hours in a 14 hour period) and have to stop in weight stations. I also am subject to DOT inspections both at weight stations and on road spot checks. I have to have a DOT medical card. I drive in many states so I had to get a DOT number and a MC number to travel interstate. However if it is not a commerical vehicle, you don't have to comply with any of this or stop in weight stations. You can't have any signs on the tow vehicle. But you better have all your saftey equitment (fire ext. , saftey reflective triangles, spare fuses and small bulbs) with you cause DOT can still stop you. And when they see a three car hauler without any commerical markings.. you can be sure they are going to be wondering why it has no DOT number and will target that vehicle for inspection. As far as a single rear wheel tow vehicle... Check the owners manual for its capabilty, but remeber the truck is only as good as the tires carrying the weight. Those two rear tires are going to be working at their limit with that much weight and side to side load. Turning puts a load on the sidewalls. How about a blowout on a rear tire when loaded?? I like the piece of mind with the dually.
Hope some of this was helpful, Don
All true and good info.
 
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