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Discussion Starter #1
Was curious if they used heavy duty (stiffer) bars on trucks with the plow package (I would think they do) and if so could you put them on to raise the front of truck without adjusting the bolts, so we could keep our wheel travel the same.
 

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I don't know if there's a difference in the torsion bars or not. But, to answer your question, any time the front end is raised you are going to lose wheel travel unless you go to aftermarket parts to alter the suspension. Meaning, the current parallelism of your suspension must remain the same and you will have to find other means to raise the truck. Otherwise you wil be altering the current wheel travel.


Dale
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I understand what you are saying. But you my not have to jack them as far.
 

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I don't agree. I posted a long explaination on this:


http://dieselplace.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=1496&PN=1


The torsion bar is simply being rotated to raise the front of the truck. Being a heaver bar only means the bar will support a heaver load. It will still have to be rotated the same amount to raise the front end. The bar is not flexing as you twist the one end. The other end is reacting equally to the changes you are making on the end with the key.


Dale
 

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Discussion Starter #5
So you are telling me that stiffer bars (not moving the bolts) is going to twist the same as the factory ones.
 

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You are correct. If you were to install stiffer bars and all other things remain the same, the truck would be raised in the front. However, as Hoot, myself and other have pointed out, there is only a certain amount of wheel travel designed into these vehicles. If we alter the ride height we alter the wheel travel.


Example: Say your truck comes from the factory and has 14 inches of total wheel travel. In the factory configuration the wheels can drop 9 inches and rise 5 inches. If I were to raise the front end 2 inches by means of the torsion bars, the wheels can now only drop 7 inches before hitting the suspension stops but can now rise 7 inches.


The point being made here is that you are limited to the 14 inches of total wheel travel. Wheather you choose to lift or lower the front end, the total wheel travel remains unchanged. The only thing that is changing is the position of the suspension in the resting state, which is somewhere between the upper and lower limits of the 14 inches.


The only way around this limitation is to raise the truck with aftermarket lift kits.
 

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This is addressing an issue that I was enquiring about in a thread I started in the 2500HD/3500 forum. Theoretically, would 2" longer shocks bring the wheel travel back to stock after doing a torsion bar lift of 2"? Would doing so cause damage on other parts due to over-extension?
 

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Eric,


I just noticed this morning that I 04duramax and myself were posting pretty heavy last night in your thread. Oooops. I wasn't looking at where the thread was. I was viewing the active topics. I'll back out and let you answer his question along with Camstyn's question.


Dale
 

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Notsdale said:
You are correct. If you were to install stiffer bars and all other things remain the same, the truck would be raised in the front. However, as Hoot, myself and other have pointed out, there is only a certain amount of wheel travel designed into these vehicles. If we alter the ride height we alter the wheel travel.


Example: Say your truck comes from the factory and has 14 inches of total wheel travel. In the factory configuration the wheels can drop 9 inches and rise 5 inches. If I were to raise the front end 2 inches by means of the torsion bars, the wheels can now only drop 7 inches before hitting the suspension stops but can now rise 7 inches.


The point being made here is that you are limited to the 14 inches of total wheel travel. Wheather you choose to lift or lower the front end, the total wheel travel remains unchanged. The only thing that is changing is the position of the suspension in the resting state, which is somewhere between the upper and lower limits of the 14 inches.


The only way around this limitation is to raise the truck with aftermarket lift kits.
Great explanation.....

The "green keys" do nothing but allow you to place the "resting state" in a lower position than the stock keys. Not a good idea.
 

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hoot said:
The "green keys" do nothing but allow you to place the "resting state" in a lower position than the stock keys. Not a good idea.

Hoot, could you explain your rationalle for your statement? I realize it's not optimal, but I fail to see the detriment which makes it "not a good idea".


Clearly the suspension will see full droop sooner and more frequent than a stock suspension, but in my experience, the increased uptravel/raising the front has an advantage in handling around corners as the front end doesn't dive nearly as much as it used to. It's a tradeoff, not necessarily an overall negative one. My thoughts anyways...
 

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Joe E,


Good point. When I owned my 2000 Land Cruiser I raised the front end close to an inch to minimize the diving in the turns. On my truck, even if the truck had set more level than it did, I would have cranked on the torsion bars a little to just to mimimize the rolling in the corners. As you mentioned, it's a tradeoff. Almost every alteration we do to our trucks is a tradeoff.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for the help. I think there was a little misleading on my question. I think we are all in agreement that by adding stiffer bars would raise the truck without putting so much preload on the factory bars. Thats kinda were I was heading with my question, maybe I did not present it right.
 

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Excellent guys, All I had to do was check some part info.. LOL


FWIW, the torsions bars have about 4 or 5 different choices depending on what is stamped on them. I did not research the option codes as there were so many choices anyways, but in lieu, you guys have come up with a good solution. Notsdale and others, your helping me out, not hindering me. Thanks


Eric
 
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