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Discussion Starter #1
Friends,


I have an 04 2500 HD (Crew Cab, Short Box). It's got the duramax and allison. I also have the "heavy duty trailer equipment" (option Z82).


I just purchased this: http://www.ultimatemxhauler.com


The hauler weighs about 75 pounds. My bike weighs about 250 pounds. Total static weight, therefore, is 325 lbs give or take.


My owner's manual says trucks equiped with a "weight carrying hitch" can have a maximum tongue weight of 600 lbs (more than enough for my application).


It also says a truck equipped with a "weight distributing hitch" can have a maximum tongue weight of 1,500 pounds (far more than I need).


My question is, with the Z82 heavy duty trailer option on my truck, what type of hitch do I have? Obviously, either is adequate for what I'm doing now, but I'm curious for the future when I someday start pulling trailers.


Also, we calculated the "static" weight of my dirt bike and the carrier as 325 pounds--well under the threshholds outlined in my owners manual. What about the "instantaneous" weight of the hitch when I go over bumps in the road, accelerate, etc. I don't think it would take much to get the hitch to momentarily weigh close to 600 pounds. Do I need to be worried?


Thanks for your help, friends.


~Terel
 

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You have a wieght carrying hitch. This means that the the hitch will support the Tounge weight of your load in the trailer, and the trailer itself. Typicaly the tounge weight of your loaded trailer should be between 10 & 12% of your loaded weight (fivers 10 - 15%), so if you have a 5000 pound trailer, then your tounge weight would be 550Lbs. (11% of the total loaded wieght). Your hitch is rated for that, but I wouldn't reccomend that. A weight distributing hitch is a device that will "distribute" the tounge weight to the front axle of the tow vehicle, and the trailer axle/s. This is purchased seperately, and as everything else, comes in different weight ratings. Hope this helps.


BillEdited by: Redapple
 

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I built something similar to yours. I snapped a pic from my balcony for you. The brake lights are flipped around for storage and 2 of the tie down outriggers are removed. It holds my street bike which is a Triumph Sprint RS 955i. The bike weighs about 475 lbs wet and the carrier is somewhere around 100+ lbs.


I also built a "hitch stabilizer". It's basically 2 plates of metal that bolt together around where the carrier inserts in the hitch receiver. I HIGHLY recommend buying/making something like this. They are sold here: http://www.hitchrider.com/nowobble.htm


The hitch stabilizer will prevent any side to side and up and down movement of the carrier. Without one, your hitch will take a lot of abuse.


About a month ago, I took a 1000 mile round trip with the bike on the back of the truck. It worked flawlessly. I only know it's back there when I look in the rear view. The truck will ride a bit smoother than when unloaded.





 

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Discussion Starter #4
Guys,


Thanks for your input. I used the motocross rack for the first time yesterday. On bumps, I noticed some jiggling that didn't make me comfortable. I got out of the truck frequently (every 30 miles or so) to check all my connections. I would be much more comfortable strengthening things a bit.


How much does a weight distributing hitch receiver cost (parts + install) on average?


For $20, the hitch vice looks like a great investment. They're local, too, so I'll swing by and pick one up while I consider the weight-distributing hitch.


Thanks again,


Terel
 

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I believe there is some confusion here.....

The Receiver Hitch that comes from the factory (V-5 TALON) on the trailering package trucks (just about ALL trucks unless you order it WITHOUT) is rated for 1,000 lbs of Tounge Weight (how the Ultimate Hauler would add the weight) and standard hitch towing a trailer of 7,500 lbs.


This SAME Receiver hitch when used with a WEIGHT DISTRIBUTING type hitch (Reese twin cam for example) is capable of a 1,500 lb Tounge Weight and a 12,000 lb trailer weight.

You'll be WELL within its limits with the bike hauler.

 

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Yep the receiver is what is mounted to the truck from the factory or aftermarket. A weight distributing hitch is what goes into the receiver and provides a way to connect weight distributing bars between the hitch and the trailer and has a ball on it just like a regular hitch would. So you should be fine with the receiver you have on your truck from the factory.
 

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I've carried a 10 ton or 20,500 lb loaded trailer off my hitch with no problems, just the hitch...no distributing bars. I can't tell you how many times I have loaded a trailer with 2,000 lbs of toung weight and still no problemo'. My guess on the toung weight would not be so much of a static load but "slowing down" a heavy trailer or slow joilting bumps that could warp the hitch.






Burner----------------->
 

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I'm thinking that in order to use a weight distributing device you actually need a trailer to disribute the weight to. We are not talking about a trailer here. I don't think the question is valid.





That being said, I have two friends who use the bike lift and they both love it and have no problems. I agree that it seems scary the way it sways, I like that hitch vise I'll have to tell them about it although they've expressed no concern over it.
 
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