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This morning I called Timken bearing to ask customer service what type of grease is put in their sealed front wheel bearings, the representative told me that there non serviceable, which I already know that's what they're supposed to be but everybody is having very good luck with greasing the front hubs as part of their regular maintenance. When I asked him what type of grease all he could tell me was that it was " proprietary" he said it's just a general type of grease and that they are non serviceable. He didn't want to give out too much information and I had to explain to him that current customers we're getting much more life out of the front wheel bearings by servicing them. Just wanted to know which is the best grease that is compatible with already in there? I have some STA lube extreme red grease already in my grease gun , it is a lithium type grease would that be compatible with what's in the hubs already? Any responses are greatly appreciated Thank you Jeff
 

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I would guess any lithium based bearing grease that's good for disc brakes.

I have read alot of folks saying they grease 'em too, but I still can't imagine how the grease actually gets into where it's needed by simply pumping it into the ABS hole. I mean, won't it just get flung to the outside never making it into the actual bearing assembly? It's not like you are "packing" the bearing so I still find it hard to see the value. I would imagine you run the risk of blowing the seals more so than doing any actual good. Not judging, just trying to understand the physics. ??
 

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Well I know I have read plenty of write ups of the benefits of greasing up and from what I have read that they are only sealed on the outside and the bearings will accept to grease. You just can't overdo it with the pumps otherwise you run the risk of blowing a seal
 

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?

Just messing. lol

But yea, if you're gonna do it I'd feel confident with a lithium based disc brake grease.

Btw, when I just changed out my OEM Timkens they were both leaking grease. They were still plenty wet inside I think. They were just worn (wobble). About 70,000 miles on 'em. I think it's a short life design so I replaced 'em with lifetime warranty ones anticipating replacing them again.
 
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Some people are on my ignore list so I'm not able to see what they post. So I don't know if this is a repost or not. This is one persons way to fill through the speed sensor and the grease he uses is Kendall Super Blue 427 grease.

You know on the more modern trucks they have unitized hubs on them? The hubs only have dust seals in them and enough grease to keep them running for a while but its set up to fail. Well, people think you cant pack them. Wrong. You can go to NAPA and buy their ...
chrome air blower with the rubber tip. All you really want is the tip. Unscrew it and put an 1/8" pipe coupler on it. Take the grease fitting off of your grease gun (hand pump grease gun not air) and thread the coupler/tip on to it. Now take your vehicle apart and pull the ABS sensor. Use Kendall Super Blue 427 grease. That looks like what is in every bearing I have taken apart. Dont mix another grease. When you get the sensor out, put the rubber tip in the sensor hole and start pumping. Now you have a seal on the inside and outside. that you need to watch for grease. Pump until you just see like a sweat coming out of the dust seal, not oozing out mind you, and stop pumping. You have to keep looking at both seals because one will let it out sooner than the other. As a rule of thumb, a 1500 takes about 32 to 36 pumps on an average, a 2500 takes anywhere from 65 to 80 pumps. Once you see the grease at the seals, Remove the rubber tip from the abs hole, rotate the hub one revolution and let the hub push out some grease thru the sensor hole. Now take a screwdriver and go in the hole, angle it so its going against the direction of rotation, till you hit the commutator inside. When you feel it, lift the screw driver up a little and rotate the hub so more grease comes up the screwdriver. Now finish cleaning the sensor hole by pulling as much grease out as you can and install the sensor. You have just packed your sealed hub. This works with any vehicle that has the abs sensor in the hub and any make.
 

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I hear ya screaminjlew. Do let me know if they last ya longer than the last set. I was on the fence if I should grease 'em when I replaced 'em. But figured since they are lifers I could be denied coverage for altering the design.

I tried searching for sound science on the topic but could only find poster opinion.

A buddy of mine that worked at a trailer company (making them) told me that he used to get tons of bad bearings brought in and that every one had a bearing buddy on it. You know, the cap you put on that has a zerk fitting for regular greasing. He said it was because people thought they were greasing their bearings by pumping it in under the cap. He swears that the only way to grease a bearing is to pack a bearing.

I don't know if it would hurt a sealed bearing to add more grease. But I really can't see how it can get into where it is needed without a true packing. ??
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
I hear ya screaminjlew. Do let me know if they last ya longer than the last set. I was on the fence if I should grease 'em when I replaced 'em. But figured since they are lifers I could be denied coverage for altering the design.

I tried searching for sound science on the topic but could only find poster opinion.

A buddy of mine that worked at a trailer company (making them) told me that he used to get tons of bad bearings brought in and that every one had a bearing buddy on it. You know, the cap you put on that has a zerk fitting for regular greasing. He said it was because people thought they were greasing their bearings by pumping it in under the cap. He swears that the only way to grease a bearing is to pack a bearing.

I don't know if it would hurt a sealed bearing to add more grease. But I really can't see how it can get into where it is needed without a true packing. ??

I I am mainly concerned as to which type of grease is compatible with the original factory grease currently I have STA lube extreme pressure red grease and I have A large needle tip that goes on the grease gun hose and I was going to inject the grease on each side of the reluctor wheel as to try to get it in the area of the bearings but I was not going to put too much as to create a problem with the seals
 

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The first couple of times i opened up a sealed bearing by prying out the plastic cover, I was shocked by how little grease there is inside.

I put a bunch more in, and snap the cover back on...
 

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I I am mainly concerned as to which type of grease is compatible with the original factory grease currently I have STA lube extreme pressure red grease and I have A large needle tip that goes on the grease gun hose and I was going to inject the grease on each side of the reluctor wheel as to try to get it in the area of the bearings but I was not going to put too much as to create a problem with the seals
Your on the right track with an EP grease. You will definitely need the extreme pressure additives. The thing with most automotive greases you buy at the store is that they are petroleum based products. Petroleum attacks certain types of plastics. If you didn't have plastic ABS sensors in the assembly I would say use whatever EP #2 grease you like.

If you look at the MSDS sheet for Sta-Plex™ Extreme Pressure Premium Red Grease it shows petroleum at 20-30 percent.

If it were my truck I would use non-petroleum EP grease like Ultralube disc/drum brake wheel bearing grease #10333 or a product similar to it.

Also Lithium greases can be made with petroleum bases so look up the MSDS for whatever product you decide to use.

HTH
 

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While the odds may be low that this is what they actually use, there is a Timken branded wheel bearing grease out there. I bought it on Amazon (hey, then it must be the real stuff, right? :)) and squirted a little into the sensor hole when I put my new Timken hub in. I probably didn't put in nearly enough to make any difference.
 

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Been using straight NLG2 grease with a needle on the end of a grease gun through ABS port to recharge bearing grease in unitized bearings for years. Do it as a part of servicing brakes.
 
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Discussion Starter #13

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I just read all the lit on their site and nowhere do they say it's good for, or call it, a wheel bearing grease so I'd be hesitant. Wheel bearing grease is pretty careful about specifically mentioning that it is for wheel bearings with disc brakes. While this stuff may work, and there are some testimonials by guys using it for trailer wheel bearings, it does not look to be designed for that purpose. Least not that they are claiming. And who knows if those trailers even had brakes?

Ooops, correction. Just watched one of their videos and the guy said "wheel bearings". It was showing a boat trailer at the time. Still don't see "wheel bearings for disc brakes" in print though. I'd stick with a grease that says very clearly that it is for wheel bearings.

Last Edit: Found it! They specifically say "Boat Trailer wheel bearings" here: http://www.greengrease.net/PDF/ggfactsheet_rev_2011_05_11.pdf

So there you have it. Good for the boat trailer.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks for the reply, I was thinking the same thing also about not mentioning disc brakes or wheel bearings. I have also been looking at Delo EP Grease , it meets all the specifications, it's a blue grease and it gets pretty good reviews
 

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Don't take this mean, I'm just gonna state the obvious and I mean nothing mean by it. K?

If you're taking the advice of posters that it's a good idea to add grease to your Timkens then perhaps also take their advice on what grease to use. Presumably they have good luck adding grease and so they must not have added the wrong grease. ?? That's all I'm saying.

Man that's hard to say without sounding sarcastic. Not meant that way. And Timken brand makes sense it seams.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
No hard feelings mp06011999, The recommended grease mentioned is Kendall super blue 427 and this Delo EP NLGI 2 grease has better timken load ratings while being almost a clone of the Kendall grease and its available at my local jobber.

https://cglapps.chevron.com/msdspds/PDSDetailPage.aspx?docDataId=77040&docFormat=PDF

http://www.phillips66lubricants.com/documents/Kendall/greases/Ken%20L-427%20Super%20Blu%20Grease%20TDSw%20726670.pdf

Delo® Grease EP — Continued
Always confirm that the product selected is consistent with the original equipment manufacturer's recommendation for the
equipment operating conditions and customer's maintenance practices.
11 March 2014
GR-35
12-16
Medium- and light-duty trucks and buses —As
with their heavy duty counterparts, the Class 7 and
Class 6 vehicles and buses require an extreme duty
grease. Delo® Greases EP will provide that
performance.
Automobiles — Delo Greases EP are exceptional
lubricants for high temperature wheel bearings and
other high performance automotive applications.
NLGI 1 and 2 are approved for
the NLGI Certification Mark GC-LB.
Delo Greases EP 2 meets the
requirements of the Mack MG-C
grease specification.
NLGI
AUTOMOTIVE
WHEEL BEARING & CHASIS
LUBRICANT
GC-LB
 

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?
?

Just messing. lol

But yea, if you're gonna do it I'd feel confident with a lithium based disc brake grease.

Btw, when I just changed out my OEM Timkens they were both leaking grease. They were still plenty wet inside I think. They were just worn (wobble). About 70,000 miles on 'em. I think it's a short life design so I replaced 'em with lifetime warranty ones anticipating replacing them again.
Which ones were those? Where did you get them?
 

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Some people are on my ignore list so I'm not able to see what they post. So I don't know if this is a repost or not. This is one persons way to fill through the speed sensor and the grease he uses is Kendall Super Blue 427 grease.

You know on the more modern trucks they have unitized hubs on them? The hubs only have dust seals in them and enough grease to keep them running for a while but its set up to fail. Well, people think you cant pack them. Wrong. You can go to NAPA and buy their ...
chrome air blower with the rubber tip. All you really want is the tip. Unscrew it and put an 1/8" pipe coupler on it. Take the grease fitting off of your grease gun (hand pump grease gun not air) and thread the coupler/tip on to it. Now take your vehicle apart and pull the ABS sensor. Use Kendall Super Blue 427 grease. That looks like what is in every bearing I have taken apart. Dont mix another grease. When you get the sensor out, put the rubber tip in the sensor hole and start pumping. Now you have a seal on the inside and outside. that you need to watch for grease. Pump until you just see like a sweat coming out of the dust seal, not oozing out mind you, and stop pumping. You have to keep looking at both seals because one will let it out sooner than the other. As a rule of thumb, a 1500 takes about 32 to 36 pumps on an average, a 2500 takes anywhere from 65 to 80 pumps. Once you see the grease at the seals, Remove the rubber tip from the abs hole, rotate the hub one revolution and let the hub push out some grease thru the sensor hole. Now take a screwdriver and go in the hole, angle it so its going against the direction of rotation, till you hit the commutator inside. When you feel it, lift the screw driver up a little and rotate the hub so more grease comes up the screwdriver. Now finish cleaning the sensor hole by pulling as much grease out as you can and install the sensor. You have just packed your sealed hub. This works with any vehicle that has the abs sensor in the hub and any make.
Hey ramblin. Not clear to me if you are a believer in the grease method or not.
 

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