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Discussion Starter · #462 ·
My Nephew in LV ordered an all Aluminum winch bumper and had it shipped to my location. I inspected it and cleaned up a couple of rough welds prior to having it blasted and powder coated the same color as both bumpers on Big Red.

The bumper is made by Victory 4x4.
019B14CA-B03E-46E1-9105-76CCC76ABACC.jpeg

A nice looking design.
11DA4D8A-4B61-4A65-AFFF-55AA59E60516.jpeg

The back side was also impressive with good choices of reinforcements.
C53E838C-B110-4FAA-A1FA-2CE59E145154.jpeg

My Nephew drove down and we set out to install the new bumper on his 17 Tacoma.
I used a laser level to plot some dots for a cut line. The truck was leveled first by adjusting tire pressure.
AEFDA696-7FCD-4BCD-8747-AFE8FE69A95F.jpeg

I cut the passengers side while he watched, then I cut him loose on the drivers side. I set up a 5" hand grinder with a 5" cut-off wheel (no guard).
0E590250-7876-4183-A786-86905A480A63.jpeg

Ready for the bumper to be fitted. I used the lift to keep my back straight. Although the new aluminum bumper only weighs 48 pounds, it's still a little awkward to handle.
6ECAB520-A606-4260-9DC0-4D72EBA67645.jpeg

We tossed close to 25 pounds of cut waste so he only gained 23 pounds but the new bumper is much better than the plastic and light weight aluminum crash bar.
BCF4F6BE-EF22-4BBF-B6DE-BC98912D5320.jpeg

The new bumper installed and driving lights wired in.
F5090FF8-2DA2-4204-BEDF-97FE5F4BB615.jpeg

My nephew cut this side and it looks great. He was nervous when it was his turn to cut. My advice to him was simple.
Take your time, let the wheel do the work, watch your depth, mind your fingers and lastly "what's the worst that can happen.....you buy a new bumper and start over. :LOL: Seriously, I use this philosophy everyday in the shop when working on some expensive piece. I have messed up my fair share of things over the years, but what we learn from our mistakes and how we handle it is the real lesson.

He did well on his side.
54C1DF4D-F1F7-438F-8F5E-DA5A15715F42.jpeg

My side turned out nice too.
4D604243-76EE-4B05-88C3-8E5214DE9639.jpeg

Done.
I'm working on custom sliders for him next.
 

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Discussion Starter · #463 · (Edited)
The next project I started was some modular stands/horses for the shop. These should help with projects too large for the jig table. One such project will be the custom aluminum flat bed for my 2500HD. These horses have leveling feet and base plates with capture nuts welded allowing for bolting them together making a large build platform.
The design began again without drawings. A 20º angle was established and the profile was laid out on the jig table.
6943E5D0-014A-4C1A-9C63-60E599929B62.jpeg

All pieces were cut on the bandsaw and de-burred.
D65E6C0C-F7EF-4EE7-A854-DFB19D2170B5.jpeg

The little gussets were made from the same material.
4463E2E2-5874-4FDB-ADA7-351D92DC671F.jpeg

A jig was tacked to the laid out end of the table.
Tip: when using your welding table to make jigs, Tack only on one side of the pieces. This allows for you to break off the tacked pieces by striking the opposite side of the tacks. I usually use a crescent wrench and bend the pieces over breaking the tacks. This makes for easier grinding without gouging the table.
46E4C87A-EBC4-4DE8-A325-160F7971E843.jpeg

One tacked, eleven to go.
5ADB8821-51C5-48C4-A9F7-5D70AB612984.jpeg

The gusset will work well.
2744BF72-8444-4D5D-AC4E-EBE9446EED1A.jpeg

The horizontal support.
TIP; alway try to tack at the very corners. This will keep your welds flat and smooth.
A small hot tack is only needed.
525958CE-2D99-4D99-BA04-93A9AD2C815A.jpeg

The jig pays off when making multiples.
A165B2E3-A0FF-4EF9-9CEC-1CC3DA9B8EA4.jpeg

Looking downward they look close.
AA7372F9-1EF9-45D7-A59D-B6DC6EF4C8C2.jpeg

The jig is torn down with ease sine they were only tacked on one side. Using a grinder flat will remove those little tacks in no time without digging into the table.
421B4C36-0358-49BB-883A-D3698F80A414.jpeg

More to come...
 

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2007 Chevrolet 3500 Silverado Classic LWB crew cab,dually, Kennedy dual pumps, , Donaldson filters
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My Nephew in LV ordered an all Aluminum winch bumper and had it shipped to my location. I inspected it and cleaned up a couple of rough welds prior to having it blasted and powder coated the same color as both bumpers on Big Red.

The bumper is made by Victory 4x4.
View attachment 643491
A nice looking design.
View attachment 643492
The back side was also impressive with good choices of reinforcements.
View attachment 643493
My Nephew drove down and we set out to install the new bumper on his 17 Tacoma.
I used a laser level to plot some dots for a cut line. The truck was leveled first by adjusting tire pressure.
View attachment 643494
I cut the passengers side while he watched, then I cut him loose on the drivers side. I set up a 5" hand grinder with a 5" cut-off wheel (no guard).
View attachment 643495
Ready for the bumper to be fitted. I used the lift to keep my back straight. Although the new aluminum bumper only weighs 48 pounds, it's still a little awkward to handle.
View attachment 643496
We tossed close to 25 pounds of cut waste so he only gained 23 pounds but the new bumper is much better than the plastic and light weight aluminum crash bar.
View attachment 643501
The new bumper installed and driving lights wired in.
View attachment 643498
My nephew cut this side and it looks great. He was nervous when it was his turn to cut. My advice to him was simple.
Take your time, let the wheel do the work, watch your depth, mind your fingers and lastly "what's the worst that can happen.....you buy a new bumper and start over. :LOL: Seriously, I use this philosophy everyday in the shop when working on some expensive piece. I have messed up my fair share of things over the years, but what we learn from our mistakes and how we handle it is the real lesson.

He did well on his side.
View attachment 643499
My side turned out nice too.
View attachment 643500
Done.
I'm working on custom sliders for him next.
Nice Job Uncle Paco 👍 😀
L8R
 
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Discussion Starter · #466 · (Edited)
Another quick job came while working on the stands. My former firefighting partner raised his Tacoma and put on new rims and tires.
The larger tires would contact the forward cab mount during moderate flexing. He purchased some plates from Total Chaos. He only contacted me after he made the purchase otherwise I could have saved him some dough.

The rig is a 2011 with a new moderate Bilstein lift of 3".
81170626-2D7C-43E6-9628-ACB811188FF8.jpeg

I really like the new wheels a lot. He found them from a Toyota dealer in CA for $156 ea. The Tires are Cooper
Discoverer. Ive been thinking about these tires for my 2500. BFG just don't last like they used to IMO.
88CAB501-1654-4974-88B1-1B4A6A219966.jpeg

Using a guard-less 5" grinder with a cut off wheel made quick work of trimming back the body mount bracket.
9314A63B-3BC9-47D2-B85B-AF0E0935B13B.jpeg

A wet shop towel was wrapped around the rubber mount to control over heating. When I cut the mount I opted to sweep it back a bit and formed the plate as I tacked it in.
CE832076-9931-4C8B-9BA6-503FEFAAADAC.jpeg

The face view.
B51222F3-4D3E-4347-A92B-C970EA2D0F86.jpeg

Passengers side touched up.
D999C082-6170-4CA3-B162-A8709B464DEE.jpeg

Drivers side.
6F649977-A837-4E67-A494-7905319EB2E8.jpeg

Looks like we created a bit more clearance.
B767DEA5-E06A-4DC5-AE32-DECD82063204.jpeg

With the wheel at full turn, the clearance is obvious.
B499CC6A-7E45-4F7B-83A2-77E85749E383.jpeg

I have a few core of solid friends that get free service from me and Brad is one of those men. He was a solid partner when we rode the back seat of the fire truck. The two worker bees I always called it with the queen bee (captain) and driver up front. :)
His rig is sweet with a commanding stance.
19740C6A-ED22-4E70-AF31-FB4E6EB51777.jpeg

Back to the custom shop stands.
 

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Discussion Starter · #467 ·
Back on the modular stands. All components that required a hole was punched on the iron worker with the exception of the wheel tabs and angle iron clips. This is a time saver once the punch station is set up correctly.
These are end plates for the top cross piece of a horse. The ends will have two holes with welded nuts.
This will provide an option for the ears to be uses ad a stop, or be flipped 180º for a continuous surface.
ADACAD3B-5305-44DA-9C35-C66EBDBE0DA7.jpeg

The tabs for the roller blade style wheels. The inner tab is threaded eliminating the need for a nut. These are 1/4-24 thread pitch to be used with socket cap screws. these are cut to 20º to match the angles on the frame legs.
3F1898A9-4311-4F2B-A519-18EEC32764C7.jpeg

The hardware to be used for this project. 1/4-24 socket cap screws for wheels, plain 3/8-16 nuts, and 3/8-16 socket cap screws for component assembly.
C7901948-AC2F-41B9-B3AB-D50BC1D0AC31.jpeg

The four hole/nuts on the main plates that make up the modular feature. The four angle iron clips utilize these holes for the sawhorse cross member.
The small aluminum spacers were made on the lathe. These will serve as bearing race spacers allowing the wheels to be tightened without restricting the free spin of the wheel bearings.
BA69A238-1EF4-465F-88C8-0E1D543087CE.jpeg

The angle clip hole location was critical for assembly.
237110ED-8C51-42F5-BDB9-4553F920621A.jpeg

The angle clips have holes drilled for the 3/8-16 socket cap screws.
Tip; The holes on the angle clips should be just large enough for the screw to pass. This will make it easier to center the nut for welding.
61B22AC9-0578-4286-BC08-C27F1A95F52C.jpeg

The angle clips will eventually be welded to the crossmembers.
CDF5FECD-F2F1-401C-A7ED-114A8641816B.jpeg

The end ears for the sawhorse are trimmed on the iron worker notcher, then a radius is formed on the disc sander.
77335D47-1A8D-4116-BF25-430F5A2CA4F5.jpeg

These plates are for the crossmembers (2-hole) and leveling feet base plates (single hole). The cross member ears are also done with a nice radius.
9C0DDB46-A8DB-4D4D-AA9E-AC6624F569B4.jpeg

With the components compleate and cleaned, the focus was now to begin tacking these pieces onto the tacked frames.
0A936A0E-C0A6-4AF1-B1ED-9AB75475293F.jpeg

More to come...
 

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Discussion Starter · #468 · (Edited)
The sawhorse cross bar ends were prepped for welding. I used a MIG for the top/bottom joints and a TIG for the sides to keep them flat.
1198D4A3-7C5C-44EE-BA83-5E1C76115459.jpeg

A fast pass at 140 amps no filler rod used. Some call this a penetration bead the books call it Autogenous welding.
5157CE10-9497-46AA-A070-1EBB8D6AFB4B.jpeg

The set up for the foot plate welding. A large 90º angle plate keeps things squared up for tacking. The Top base plates were welded using a torpedo level to match the table.
130EA848-497E-49A2-A75B-3960152CBB23.jpeg

A shot of the underside of the top base plate. Two of those capture nuts now are inside each tube. A solid connection for sure.
40F5F5D8-5320-4F93-BC16-8CF6AA18752C.jpeg

Four down eight to go!
462EAECA-8170-4AE5-B4F5-7B562F05A3FD.jpeg

Main frames done. A simple jig to tack up the A frames pays off. All pieces are very close to one another.
E078E086-086B-47D7-B80A-145557198C19.jpeg

The levels also prove they are very close.
Notice the 3/8-16 elevator bolts I used for leveling.
5F55BD5A-A27F-4077-9710-54D4E1DB6804.jpeg
Hi
Welding in both the cross pieces. The top cross piece is removable while the intermediate piece ties in both A frames to create a buildable platform for custom applications. The wheels and leveling bolts are added.
7C986A3D-D4F2-43E3-BE4D-3DFBE63F9CC4.jpeg

Another angle of a completed sawhorse/stand. The top crosspiece ears or tabs can be flipped for a continuous surface or a stop to keep round material from rolling off the stand as shown.
E553982F-8D1F-4DB9-BED9-87B7BFFF337A.jpeg

A bottom view.
5560655A-7008-4322-A914-D48984786D92.jpeg

With only two stands completed, I was pulled off my project to work on some custom pieces for the Firefighter Union Hall local 479. The same hall I built the custom brackets for the fireman's slide pole repurposed as a bar foot rest.
This was an emergency job since they learned I would be having another knee surgery and would be out of commission for a couple of months.
More on that job later.
 

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Discussion Starter · #469 · (Edited)
On the Union hall job, They requested a large Maltese cross and a four beer tap setup to look like a pump panel on a fire truck. The Union president specifically requested the Maltese to be 60" in size. As far as the pump panel taps, I had no sketch of any kind.
I went to the new hall and surveyed the wall space were they wanted the Maltese and also took measurements of the area where the taps would be located.

I collaborated with a close friend who recently purchased a new ShopSabre plasma table. A very nicely built machine with the latest plasma cutting technology by Hypertherm. I hired him to cut out the Maltese from a 14 guage 5'x10' sheet. I also picked up a sheet of 304 stainless steel for the pump panel face and top. We used his plasma to cut the larger holes since I was already working on the Maltese at his location.

The beer taps took priority as a functioning tap would do more than art hanging on a wall. At least that's how I saw it.
The beer tap frame was constructed from 16 ga 3/4" square tubing. All angles were mitered then the frame was TIG welded.
For the ends, I used 1/8" aluminum diamond plate and polished it to a high gloss. This material us used on pumpers, and I felt it would look fantastic along with the stainless.
Here, the ends are being fitted with a nut-sert with a 10-24 thread pitch. The ends need to be removable to access the connections for the tap hoses. using a sheet metal screw would eventually strip so I opted for the inserts.
47187E50-DEE8-4958-99FC-19F22C3E645A.jpeg

The ends fit nice. I also used a pump panel faceplate to mock up a cross member location to prevent any conflicts with hole locations.
AB85BA42-B367-40E4-8EFB-DEAA91D21343.jpeg

This is one of four face plates that will be used to display a glycerin filled pressure gauge and the actual tap.
All gauges were sourced from Fire maintenance and are old gauges removed from service. This adds to the nostalgia of the entire build. These gages functioned at many fires over the years so that a cool fun fact.
A97B0C30-A4FE-4CB8-B010-B423D7E2F916.jpeg

The tap measures 36-5/16" wide and 19" tall. With these measurements I could now cut the 304 stainless to size.
I wanted the corners of the aluminum sides to meet the edge of the stainless face panel for a clean fit and finish.
This will eliminate any need for trim.
0A7103A4-2571-4151-8A31-A1C0CC84041F.jpeg

after cutting the main face panel and top cap. It was time to give the stainless a brushed grain finish to match the texture/finish of an actual pump panel. Sorry no photos of this as its messy and requires a respirator.
After the top cap was grained, a 1/2" lip was broken 90º to capture the entire top lip of the face panel to eliminate any fasteners keeping the face clean.
Here the back of the framework is stepped to allow fitment against the bar wall that has a custom mirror and 2-1/2" fire hose braided feature. This will become clear once I post up the taps installed.
7EC0C6A8-519E-438F-85BB-6F2830B635D7.jpeg

The freshly grained stainless is taped up for layout of the screw holes.
That grain finish really looks nice.
5219BAC0-B5F4-420B-8730-1FF3F5776DB2.jpeg

The holes drilled and de-burred.
AF625FAC-9682-4CCF-91BB-B73EF3787ED8.jpeg

At this point, The entire piece is upright and I step back to visualize it. Since no drawing was used, I find it beneficial to study the piece incase of additions or change of direction without starting over. The top cap also worked out as planned. Two screws on top secure the cap and captures the top panel without the need for additional screws keeping things clean. The corners on the sides also fit nicely.
474AB4B0-AD4A-492E-ABED-D4220C411528.jpeg

Time to secure the faceplates to the panel.
AEB9B20F-3E52-4E8B-B1E6-0BE5FDC94FF4.jpeg

A shot of the top cap showing the horizontal grain working with the vertical grain on the face.
Painters tape was used to protect the grain finish when the lip was broken.
F1973287-6914-48C9-975D-45F1AA17B901.jpeg

More to come...
 

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Discussion Starter · #470 · (Edited)
With the work completed, the tap was dismantled and the main frame painted with black epoxy.
While the paint was curing, I then turned some aluminum plugs to press into the pull handles that will eventually thread onto the actual taps.
Here you can see the tap cutting new 3/8-16 threads that will thread onto the tap.
59A0F895-819A-4217-9D06-E525256CF984.jpeg

The handles are complete.
5284CDFF-E8A8-4911-9D04-EECAF016637C.jpeg

You can see the aluminum plug that was turned and pressed in followed by drilling and tapping.
CC680A65-A2AC-4FBC-B94F-76D7046A8120.jpeg

A front view of the tap handle looks like what's found on a pump panel. Same history on these pull handles. They saw years of service with Tucson Fire.
A8A2DD57-E5F0-47A7-89EC-E843D23E82C1.jpeg

Reassembly after the paint cured. Almost complete, one last gauge to install, thread on the handles, and then move into location and hook up the beer.
2616D1F3-4C11-424A-8448-FEEB5C155672.jpeg

Here it is in place and in service.
7D8FDF1D-C5AC-4870-83F9-4358919B82AD.jpeg

A peek from the left side show why the step in the rear was required.
29D04BFC-0BBE-4A9A-B774-B4FF7D541D46.jpeg

A centered shot. The 2-1/2" hose was braided and installed by another member and will be trimmed out along the bottom. This hose saw many years of firefighting service with TFD. The frame around the mirror was once a fireman's pole base supporting three poles. This particular base was pulled from service prior to 1970 and remained in storage until now (the same warehouse were I sourced the pole for the bar stool foot rest). I don't know the complete history but it was utilized for many years by TFD. The large round speaker in the reflection (top of mirror) came from old station 1 (HQ), apparatus bay. There were several in the bay of old station one. These speakers were where our dispatches would sound off from. The round design gives way to the early 70's.
6CEABBEF-AD99-4ED2-B128-A6E33EF415B2.jpeg

BTW, the round speakers were refitted with JBL quality speakers. The bar woodwork was done by yet another retired member and friend of mine. The thick counter used as a bar was an old shuffleboard that came from our original hall. This thing is quite old as well. The bricks came from old station 4 that was demolished about the time I started with TFD. Our union president was a mason prior to becoming a firefighter and laid them up. Lastly, at the base of the bar you can see the repurposed fireman's pole used now as a foot rest. I did this a few months back prior to my failed knee surgery.
8048B48F-A64D-4561-938D-3BCE3C25B03E.jpeg

More on the Maltese later...
 

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Discussion Starter · #472 ·
The Maltese was a match to the mirror design but required close to four hours of CAD work to convert into a DXF file.
I can't express how much I dislike computer work. Sitting for four hours with no metal work completed just doesn't fit into my idea of productivity.
The holes were programed into the cutting to allow for a template for hanging. The cross hairs are there for reference to aid in superimposing the center ring, the large 479, and the TFFA letters.
9DABF46D-E112-41EF-B753-52308E426F0A.jpeg

The 60" Maltese is cut.
2216AD14-C4FC-49EE-87C1-E09C993C6CE2.jpeg

After a cutting the large Maltese, I gave it a swirling pattern. This will give it depth and a sort of holographic effect when done.
A quick video of the dirty task. Yes, my right knee was killing me.

All the pieces after surface finish is done. They are just laying there, nothing is measured yet.
The large 479 and TFFA are finished using the same hand held drum finisher used to grain the stainless steel pump panel tap. I kept the grain vertical on those pieces, the center ring was done in a round pattern to break your eyes from one focus point.
0AB2E20C-7CFC-4F93-B390-6213D7131AAD.jpeg

The cross got treated to candy red paint from House of Kolor followed by 40oz of clear.
The ring, numbers and letters were shot in clear only. While the pieces were curing, I set out to make a template and make some spacers to mount to the wall of the hall.
Back to my shop....
I turned eight 1.5" x 1.5" round spacers on the lathe. One end was drilled and threaded to 1/4-20 thread pitch and the second end was drilled and tapped for 3/8-16 thread pitch. The four to the rear show the 1/4-20 and the front four show the 3/8-16 button head Allen screws used to mount the piece.
0F23803D-40B5-4E73-A7D4-D4D4E897CBE7.jpeg

Random shot of the gang of eight. I ended up polishing these pieces as well.
4DCD4385-BCA6-4D46-80FD-29642D3887EC.jpeg

The long 1/4-20 bolts got the heads cut off as I only needed a threaded stud. These were secured with red loc-tite.
3D165854-095D-48AF-AA98-2B320D693109.jpeg

The anchors I used were rated at around 100 pound each. I'm not 100% I would use them again.
98162A99-045A-48E6-B97B-1C63DFDE2FEA.jpeg

The four anchors were set using a cardboard template. A level revealed the template and holes burned into the cross were on the money. The other four spacers only had the 3/8-16 tapped holes and used only as spacers not anchors. Gorilla double sided tape will keep the four spacers planted against the wall while the other four actually support the art work to the wall.
6B440685-6734-4ADB-967C-E3C5FECDE625.jpeg

At this point I did some simple math to determine the distance from the wall to shine four beams of light at 30º.
The lights required a mounting bar that would span two trusses. The lights were also hard wired in.
Notice the off center bracket? The control joint on the wall was my center line for the cross.
The light mount was designed to be easily moved closer to the wall incase of excess shadowing at the bottom of the art piece.
9F9FC4C4-A925-4C25-ABD9-0AE3300440FC.jpeg

More to come...
 

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Discussion Starter · #473 ·
Here the pieces are held down with weight to ensure a good bond.
The ring first.
Remember the cross hairs on the small print?
This helped locate the exact location of all the pieces. A grease pencil is used to mark the finished cross. This wipes away easily.
C2029A65-575B-44FF-AAFD-A9FFAFB2C66E.jpeg

The large 479 in the center and TFFA curing.
54583CA1-AFE1-4649-AB7D-1405D4DD10CA.jpeg

Arrival to the site. Thats a 8' wide dump trailer to give you perspective of the size.
BBF4BF1B-CE15-4765-980A-89905A35F604.jpeg

Not gonna lie, I didn't get much sleep the night prior to this shot. I was sweating the hole line up for some reason.
It has to be the fact that I used the computer to lay out the holes burned on the plasma table. I can't get past trusting computers. I'm a hands on knucklehead.
TRUST THE COMPUTER!!!!
The holes indexed perfectly. I had a near by fire crew (ladder 4) stop in to help hang the piece.
I did move the lights closer to the wall by ten inches to limit the lower shadow. This piece is really big for a 10' truss height.
66CDB160-CE1C-4CBD-AA32-EB7823FD48BE.jpeg

Another shot after the lights were relocated forward.
FE1277E6-66E5-432E-88A0-E732A5DB1D3E.jpeg

The video shows the holographic effect I was after.


I put a coat of spray on Meguiar's wax and buffed off any paw prints to complete this job.
Now back to my shop horses stands.
Thank for looking.
Turn and Burn!
 

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Awesome!
 
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Discussion Starter · #475 ·
BTW, this was done last Friday so I'm close to brining my Diesel place brethren up to speed on my projects.
The projects I've shared so far are from 2014 to present and don't include my personal GM automotive work. I try to post those in the appropriate locations on this forum.

This AM I had a CT of my right hip, knee and ankle done. The data will be sent to Styker were they will create a 3D model of said parts. The data will be uploaded to the Mako robotic surgical system.
This robot will guide the Orthopedic surgeon in removing the correct amount of bone required to include exact angles to match my current anatomy. The surgeon tells me the robotic arm prevents him from eyeballing knee replacements. It will not allow the surgeon from removing unnecessary bone and keep the angles to my anatomy. He stated the accuracy of this new technique is within 1/2 millimeter. To me that's 0.020" of an inch, not acceptable for machining a part but better than free handing it like it's been done for years. I only need a new medial knee so recovery should be quicker than a total knee replacement. I have had some attitude issues with my pups passing, constant pain and not able to hike. My shop work has kept me from falling into a pit of depression and I'm truly thankful to our creator for the skills I have honed and continue to hone.
I'm gonna have to trust the computer once again on the 15th of June when I get a new medial knee.
I'll post up my last progress on the stands tomorrow. and will not be able to share new projects for around eight weeks.
The next few days will be spent taking care of house projects. My wife's back is healing nicely and she's been hitting up PT twice a week and on her own in between. My two remaining pups will be happy to go on long walks again, soon.
 

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He stated the accuracy of this new technique is within 1/2 millimeter. To me that's 0.020" of an inch, not acceptable for machining a part but better than free handing it like it's been done for years.
So why would the tolerance on a medical piece of equipment be less than when you machine a part? I would think it would be the same or better? Any thoughts? Or is the Dr. just spewing info and doesn't have the in depth knowledge of the machine and it's capabilities?
 

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With the work completed, the tap was dismantled and the main frame painted with black epoxy.
While the paint was curing, I then turned some aluminum plugs to press into the pull handles that will eventually thread onto the actual taps.
Here you can see the tap cutting new 3/8-16 threads that will thread onto the tap.
View attachment 643711
The handles are complete.
View attachment 643712
You can see the aluminum plug that was turned and pressed in followed by drilling and tapping.
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A front view of the tap handle looks like what's found on a pump panel. Same history on these pull handles. They saw years of service with Tucson Fire. View attachment 643714
Reassembly after the paint cured. Almost complete, one last gauge to install, thread on the handles, and then move into location and hook up the beer.
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Here it is in place and in service.
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A peek from the left side show why the step in the rear was required.
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A centered shot. The 2-1/2" hose was braided and installed by another member and will be trimmed out along the bottom. This hose saw many years of firefighting service with TFD. The frame around the mirror was once a fireman's pole base supporting three poles. This particular base was pulled from service prior to 1970 and remained in storage until now (the same warehouse were I sourced the pole for the bar stool foot rest). I don't know the complete history but it was utilized for many years by TFD. The large round speaker in the reflection (top of mirror) came from old station 1 (HQ), apparatus bay. There were several in the bay of old station one. These speakers were where our dispatches would sound off from. The round design gives way to the early 70's.
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BTW, the round speakers were refitted with JBL quality speakers. The bar woodwork was done by yet another retired member and friend of mine. The thick counter used as a bar was an old shuffleboard that came from our original hall. This thing is quite old as well. The bricks came from old station 4 that was demolished about the time I started with TFD. Our union president was a mason prior to becoming a firefighter and laid them up. Lastly, at the base of the bar you can see the repurposed fireman's pole used now as a foot rest. I did this a few months back prior to my failed knee surgery.
View attachment 643718
More on the Maltese later...
OK PACO
Super nice job, great workmanship as usual, now is it beer thirty yet? 🤔
 
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2007 Chevrolet 3500 Silverado Classic LWB crew cab,dually, Kennedy dual pumps, , Donaldson filters
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Paco
I have had both knees scoped 2 times. Have had both knees total replacement. Left knee first 6 weeks later did the right.
At least your doc will use the computer. My doc thought he did better by hand and eye alignment, my thoughts he was attempting to get more surgeries done in the allotted time. Went back for a follow up a yr later. He had a hip joint replaced by one of the docs in his group, I noticed a different attitude after he was on the other side of the table.

Good thing you treated the wife right a few months ago, best of luck to you, hopefully all goes well. Will be thinking of you and offering a few prayers.

Till L8R Lil Brother
 
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Good Luck to you on your up coming medical procedure, trust the computers, my neighbors all around me had it done, recovery time was very swift!

Oh, by the way great skill set on all of the metal work!
Wish I had the time to dedicate to that, as when I started JR high & then High School that's what I really wanted to do, but you know life takes you in different directions and here we are today, 43 years after High School, doing sales management!

God Bless You!
 
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