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Discussion Starter · #421 ·
So how long did it take for the client to bring it back for you to get rid of those original front compartment access doors someone else did and make 'em look as awesome as everything you did? lol

What a nice looking project. Thanks for sharing.
Thanks for the input, I wish he would bring it back. Those doors are horrible to say the least. The owner does appreciate quality work and I have a hunch he might come back for new doors soon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #422 ·
The customer has an appreciation for quality but, spent quite a lot on this project. He purchased the rig and brought it right to my shop for modifications. I made him a deal to replace the two sub-standard doors since I was going to repaint the entire bed but in the end he simply was too deep financially. He has reached out a few time to share his pleasure with the functionality of the rig and has been booked with jobs. He sent me a cell video of a highline operation where he used two of the padeye anchors on the canopy to traverse large branches from several stories up. It was slick and cool to see things work well.
He might want new doors once he recovers from the overall purchase. Most likely during the winter when he slows down some.

I do appreciate your feedback and compliments. I enjoy working on things that are challenging. Many times my profit margin suffers but most of the time I earn enough to cover my overhead and some mad money for more tooling.
I don't know how long I can keep working alone on larger jobs. My body tells me to stop but my mind is in charge.
On this job I was to the point of framing in the bed storage compartments when I took a week off to meet my son and nephew in Colorado. We did an Alpine hike in the San Juan mountains. We did Snuffles Traverse hut hiking. We would hike to a different hut every day adding detours along the way. On the second to last day, I blew my right knee out.
I was able to finish on my own and even continued on this and several more project including firefighting until surgery could be preformed. The Arborist project required going up and down on ladders so I was in terrible discomfort. My first shift back we had a house fire that required me pulling 200' of 1-3/4"hose line. Advancing this line hurt a fair amount.
My surgery was this past January and the knee is now as bad as before. I haven't been able to hike since last October due to the discomfort. I'm scheduled for a new right knee on June 15th. It's a partial replacement and will be preformed by a robot with impressive tolerances. A CAT scan will map my knee and the data will be inputted into the computer that controlled the robot. Pretty cool stuff. I'm looking forward to a pain free walk again.
I sill have a few more project to share that will bring us to current time.
Thanks again for stop in!
Turn and Burn!
 

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Discussion Starter · #423 · (Edited)
The next project came in as I was finishing up the Arborist truck. The client came down from Prescott Az to meet with me and talk about his 2002 F-350 4x4. He had a small window to have this project done as his truck was scheduled for a complete rebuild of his 7.3 Power Stroke and new transmission. The shop performing the work is in Texas. He wanted me to design and build a front and rear bumper as well as some Suspention work. His timeline was too short for the amount of work he wanted. I was still employed by fire so that also limited my time as well. I showed him the MOVE website and he chose a front bumper as well as a rear. He also wanted a tire carrier. The list seemed to go and he left it to me to research and order all the goods.
This is the classic winch mount front bumper with wing lights. I had never put a MOVE bumper together before and was excited to see how it fit together. The center section is 1/4" thick while the rest of the components are 3/16".
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The rear bumper will have a swing out tire carrier and pod LED lights. The tire carrier had not arrived yet for this photo.
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Removing the after market HD brush guard and bumper was tough alone but the fork lift is my best friend.
Here I'm locating the frame horn bumper mounts.
Both batteries were disconnected prior to any welding or plasma cutting,
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The front end was taped up to protect from scratching etc. The front bumper starts with the center section. It's imperative to get this section as perfect as possible as it is the foundation for the rest of the build.
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Looking from the front. I gave "big red" girly eyes being a Ford and all.:D Those center location lines and outer reference lines are also important for the build.
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The wings were tacked up. I should also mention all edges were cleaned using a flap disc to eliminate any dross left from the plasma cutting. This will provide a clean porosity free weld. I also beveled all weld joints as I planned on a smooth outer finish.
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The end caps required slight trimming and adjustments for my liking. That lower cross member will be dealt with later.
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Passengers side.
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The MOVE instructions are very minimal but it's not rocket science. They provide a disclaimer in the paperwork stating any and all reinforcement would be up to the fabricator to design and implement.
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Knowing I would be removing/installing this bumper a few times, I opted to make it as easiest as possible by using a capture nut or in this case a bolt capture plate. This eliminates the use of a second wrench in hard to reach areas.
These grade 8 bolts use to mount one side (6 bolts total per side) were the hardest to access.
77D70374-DEAA-4C96-969E-474B1E53513E.jpeg

More to come...
 

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Very cool!

FWIW, I used to buy these bumpers for the company rigs and still have 'em on my LBZ. You may find the details about them interesting like the 1/2 inch center sections and the costs. Mine is all stainless, polished to a chrome finish. They told me it takes longer to polish it (a week) than it does to make it. I estimated the front one with the full push bars weighs in about 300 pounds.
IIRC, I spent over $6000 for the set of front and rear. But I have never seen a stronger good looking bumper. And yes, they should pay me for the glowing recommendations for over 20 years. LOL
 

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For folks checking into my bumpers know that I have not done business with them in over 10 years. Not since they were sold from the family business in NorCal that they were. Dianne was the owner then so just know that I can't say they are the same since being bought out. I started working with them back in I think 1999 and not since about 2008.
 

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Discussion Starter · #429 ·
The tacked front bumper was removed and welded both inside and out. It's imperative to skip weld to control warping since I kept the gap lines tight and even.
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The inside.
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Using the forklift the bumper was taken outside for grinding and blending. The fork lift makes it convenient to get the hight my back likes.
Drivers side.
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Passengers.
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Squeezing in the winch and control box took some time to find the right fit. Move was less than helpful when I inquired on a winch for this application so I was on my own. I knew the control box would have to be located separately from the winch because of the limited area.
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This view is of the plug for the winch switch on the controller. A custom tab brackets were made to support the controller.
It was tight sitting next to the winch. Although the space between the two looks wider, the gap is actually about 1/8".
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On the winch, the free spool lever is also access from the top opening to the right of center as you'r facing the front.
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At this point all brackets are only tacked in. The bumper was reinstalled to ensure no interference occurs.
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So far so good. Really happy with the lines and gaps. No warpage occurred during the hot work.
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Back off to weld in the winch/controller mounts and add reinforcements to the winch mount. The two tab brackets for the controller worked out well. The bolt capture plate will pay off during removal or installation especially on this end as the control box would make it difficult to access the bolt heads.
5D994B72-BD3F-4707-BACA-877C7CF7FCB4.jpeg

More to come...
 

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Discussion Starter · #430 ·
Wile the bumper was off the rig, I also burned in the LED POD light brackets.
3FA2C30C-EF13-4697-B437-B8A55299D1F0.jpeg

Drivers.
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Passengers.
The blue is a protective film. BTW, here you can see the setup I used to keep the bumper secured to the fork lift. The large 90º set up plate was clamped to a fork while the bumper was secured to the plate. This made it nice to align the bumper into position for installing.
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The lower cross member was used to tie in the bumper for further reinforcement. Tie in brackets were designed and made from 1/4" x 1.5" x 1.5" angle iron. They had a custom bend and would bolt the bumper to the cross member using clips made from the same material.
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Drilled and capture buts welded to the new support brackets. Radius and dressed.
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Another angle of the tie in brackets. These will also provide added support when the rig is winched at a slight angle.
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Burned in the brackets to the bumper and the clips to the cross member. I also tacked in the recovery anchors.
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Here you can see the clip to the cross member.
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Now to cut this ugly overhang.
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Unbolting the cross member from the bumper and frame, the cross member was cut on the band saw for a clean accurate cut.
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More to follow...
 

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Discussion Starter · #431 ·
The cross member cut and ready for end plates.
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End caps welded in and the member painted.
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Another angle.
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Reinstalled the cross member. The recovery anchors are burned in hot. I had some reservations about uncontrolled warping since the anchors are in line with the mounting brackets. Any slight distortion could result in a tight wing gap or even unwanted contact with the fender.

I rigged some HD ratchet straps to hopefully prevent any upward distortion. In fact I preloaded the wings downward some. The winch, control box and lights were removed prior to the final bumper installation before it's off to blasting and powder coating.
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The anchors burned in. I spent time cleaning and smoothing the edges on the anchors for a cleaner look.
The cross member also looks much better trimmed back and serves to further reinforce the winch bumper.
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After relaxing the straps, the bumpers gaps were maintained.
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With the front bumper completed, it was time to work on the rear bumper. The rear light openings were slightly oversized:mad:, meaning I had to buildup with a little weld then blend for a better fit. The mounting holes were drilled on the mill prior to tacking together. The license plate holes were treated to capture nuts and the large trailer connection hole was also punched out on the mill. The hitch receiver was removed for repair as the receiver was extremely sloppy and worn.
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Everything lined up with slight persuasion and is looking pretty good.
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With the old worn receiver removed a new longer receiver is laid out for burning in. Inside view.
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outside view.
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More to come...
 

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Discussion Starter · #432 ·
Getting the new longer receiver aligned.
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Another view.
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Burning in the new receiver and tying in both the structures for added strength. Yes, a capture nut was welded in on the tie in bracket.
F74783A5-56B3-4FAA-90B5-39C9B1E33771.jpeg

The rear bumper was removed for welding and blending. On the tire carrier side, I reinforced the entire area to prevent and flex with the weight of the cantilever set up.
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A fair amount of welding to the rear bumper but skipping around will keep things straight.
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The repaired hitch is painted while the bumper is off.
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The smaller holes are drilled with the bumper facing up. New LED license plate lights also drilled in.
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The rear bumper was reinstalled to ensure nothing warped. At this point all electrical modifications were made to the front driving/fog lamps and rear back up lights.
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The tire carrier was also built and welded in place. This took some added time as the tire carrier required some work.
A cardboard template of the tire diameter worked well to ensure the proper placement of the entire set up.
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The welded carrier bracket. The large bolt required the head to be faced down some allowing for a gap when the tailgate is down.
I faced the bolt head on the lathe.
3E7B6C02-A21A-4DB0-B11B-7DBBE4CEE99E.jpeg

More later...
 

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Your welding skills are incredible. Very nice work that you perform.
 
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Discussion Starter · #434 ·
Your welding skills are incredible. Very nice work that you perform.
Thanks for stopping in.
been welding for a long time. Probably have over 20k hours of welding (at least). The sad truth is I now require cheaters to weld and machine since my eyes no longer focus nakid.
Happy Memorial Day!
 

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Discussion Starter · #435 · (Edited)
The locking mechanism for the tire carrier Move provided was sub-standard IMO. I had zero confidence in the lock and felt it would rattle resulting in metal fatigue and eventually cracking stress points. I found a nice solution at J.W. Winco.
All stainless construction with a redundant lock to prevent accidental release. This did require additional work to make weld on threaded pads.
The smaller two hole pad had two blind threaded holes (after welding in). while the larger four holed pad will use threaded holes that pass through the bumper to support stainless nyloc nuts.
DA106A3D-D2CE-4302-AB05-1F1EAB883D7F.jpeg

A side view shows the loaded tire carrier vertical with no sag. Notice the tire template to the lower right.
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The tire swung 180º allowing full access. This is why I used a cardboard template to mimic the OD of the tire for proper placement. I kept it as close as possible (to center line) but allows for proper function.
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Welding in the pads.
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Access is through the lower hoop.
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I also fabricated a couple of 1/4"x 1" locking tabs for the use of a stainless steel padlock.
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Overall shot of the locking over center latch. The red thumb pad requires depressing to release the latch. A significant improvement over Moves latch.
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Done!
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Now to remove both bumpers to have them sand blasted and powder coated.
While the bumpers are being finished, I worked on the trucks Suspention. The front passengers shock was leaking. The front shocks were a Ranchos 9000 while the rears were KYB MonoMax. The front steering stabilizer also showed signs of leaking.
All the shocks were removed and the rig was moved outside for flex measurement using the fork lift. I discovered the front shock were the wrong size (too short) and as a result had over traveled resulting in leaking. I also discovered the rig had a 4" lift over stock based on the flex numbers. I researched the collapsed and extended measurements I had from the flex test. I found the correct set of Bilsteins 51 series shocks.
I also ordered a matching steering stabilizer. Another find was all wheel stud nuts were worn and hard to spin by hand. I purchase new wheel lug nuts and locks. The spare tire and wheel was also new to match the others.

More to come..
 

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Man you do nice work (y)

A thought.... I think I would get tired of locking / unlocking the tire carrier every time I wanted to get in the bed, dropping the tailgate. I would think a lock on the tire to the carrier instead of on the carrier to the bumper would permit the tire to be secure, while not having to fiddle with a lock just to drop the gate. Or, perhaps the client likes the added security that you can't open the gate without unlocking the carrier.

I do love the quick release latch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #437 ·
Man you do nice work (y)

A thought.... I think I would get tired of locking / unlocking the tire carrier every time I wanted to get in the bed, dropping the tailgate. I would think a lock on the tire to the carrier instead of on the carrier to the bumper would permit the tire to be secure, while not having to fiddle with a lock just to drop the gate. Or, perhaps the client likes the added security that you can't open the gate without unlocking the carrier.

I do love the quick release latch.
Thank you!
The spare tire utilizes a wheel lock like each tire on the rig. The added pad lock is simply an option allowing to secure the the carrier and the beds access. I used a similar set up on my 2500 rear tire carrier. The main reason I keep my carrier locked at all times is the fact people do nefarious things in parking lots. If a clown was to unlatch the carrier, the first time you hit the accelerator, brakes or turn, severe damage would result from the uncontrolled weight mass. The pad lock is just an option but I use mine 100% of the time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #438 · (Edited)
The bumpers finish turned out great. My aim was to match the running boards already installed. A fine wrinkle semi-gloss black. Again, all hardware used for ancillary items were stainless steel.
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Getting ready to washed the outside of the rig in preparation for the customers delivery.
The front.
The winch cable was spooled out and the first four wraps around the winch drum were painted red followed by 4' of yellow to indicate to the user the end was near.
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That rear light bar was already installed but I wired it in for him on a dedicated protected circuit. The rear back up flush mount lights were wired in to the reverse circuit with an override switch.
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After washing the rig, it was moved out to sun for final inspection.
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Front lines/gaps are nice.
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Another view. The steering stabilizer was shipped and in transit to my location as was a recovery bag with a snatch block, 4 shackles, recovery straps and other goodies.
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A walk through video;
All done!
Thanks for following along.
 

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As always, phenomenal work, design, details and those welds!!! (y)
Curious if there would be any issue with local law enforcement as to the partial view of the license plate?
 

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Discussion Starter · #440 ·
As always, phenomenal work, design, details and those welds!!! (y)
Curious if there would be any issue with local law enforcement as to the partial view of the license plate?
Thank you for your compliments. On the license plate question. I suppose if an officer wanted to be a dic* he/she could cite a repair order but very unlikely since the numbers can be seen at an angle. I think towing a trailer blocks more of a plate than this application. Many elderly run rear ramp platforms to haul rascal type scooters completely blocking the plate. My personal rig has a custom mud flap bracket that supports my lit plate on the drivers side. This makes it impossible to see the plate from the right lane if I was in the middle. Been running this way since 2006 with zero problems from LEO.
My plate set up;
F3B89A5C-B7F8-4255-900A-C8AB055B8B43.jpeg

For mp06011999, here's my 100% home made over center latch on my rig. The lever is secured with a lock as well.
I don't find it a hassle to unlock it to access the bed.
8C9B8BB0-9514-4501-BF22-5F496448523A.jpeg
 
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