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Discussion Starter · #281 · (Edited)
The final read head mount for the Z-axis. This application the scale is fixed while the read head is dynamic unlike the cross slide. Two more holes drilled and tapped. Slotted holes provide up/down, in/out adjustment. This bracket comes with the DRO kit bit requires machining of the slotted holes.
71ECCA61-33C5-44CB-B352-7BD4337C3452.jpeg

A different angle.
76C996D3-D075-498C-BE47-F94625F072C4.jpeg

Verifying ample travel clearance of the mounting brackets. About an 1" left for a safety margin.
9AFDC9E2-0B49-472F-AB49-8985A7F223BA.jpeg

We have X-axis and Z-Axis readings now!
3BDCABC8-814E-4EDE-91E1-DD5C00A2D077.jpeg

The dust cover cut, drilled and mounted.
06EB8A45-4DE5-468F-B689-8297E0811726.jpeg

Another view.
7CD3DD8B-2BC6-46E8-87B3-03B41AE2D4E2.jpeg

Because I wasn't happy with the Read screen mounting arm and mount, A custom one was milled on the Lagun.
The arm will pivot at the mounting block and again at the screen unit. This design provides a solid mount and looks amazing IMO. I also designed the mounting block to mount over the electrical cabinet allowing the entire assembly to rotate out of the way to remove the top cover plate of the head stock.
575CC188-9227-4788-85B9-57B56BECDBD1.jpeg

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Discussion Starter · #282 ·
With the Z-axis installed I started on the final ZZ-Axis. This will be much more of a complicated custom install.
Although the tailstock graduations are accurate, my eyes would rather read a DRO. I decided to do a custom tail stock install.
7D068DB8-F178-45D2-8032-2F3C4A9F62A1.jpeg

An a]example of the flexibility of using magnetic scales vs glass scales. The magnetic scales can be cut to custom lengths while a glass scale can't. Glad scales are also more prone to swarf fouling and worse breakage sense they are actual glass. By removing an end cap the thin SS mag scale can be slid out then cut. The extruded bracket also cut then reassembled.
FF5914D9-C736-4DA6-B9A1-B543ECB9F832.jpeg

Here you can see I cut it down.
1610774F-E929-4834-AA06-454F4DB8A58B.jpeg

The beauty of a milling machine. Face milling a custom design bracket with the mill head in a 12º nod.
B7C0C34F-FFF2-492B-BE51-B2F01ED51173.jpeg

I'm designing this as I go so it took some time. The scale mount is designed to allow the scale to nest in place. The back angle will conform the the factory angle on the tailstock.
2620A030-F052-42BE-9833-46C13BDD2CE0.jpeg

This will give you guys an idea of the way the scale will sit.
D3EC0C65-D792-4E39-84CF-7804B7A46422.jpeg

Sweeping the flat surface of the Kurt vice using a coaxeal interment brings the mill head perpendicular to the table.
2EF61E9C-3C47-4510-A701-BDE1CE9E20A2.jpeg

Milling the second part of the bracket. My idea and hope was to make a two piece bracket that would marry and slide while remaining perfectly aligned. This would be the base that mounts to the tailstock while the scale sits inside.
0B1D0610-6E7E-4E4A-9D61-773ABA5467CE.jpeg

An end view shows the sharp angle required to bring the scale perpendicular to the world.
59280100-1EAE-46A0-8EF7-CC40D7BEF59B.jpeg

The scale rests snuggly into the track milled.
356FD0D2-FC3F-4A37-904B-8404BC602AE2.jpeg

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Discussion Starter · #283 · (Edited)
Milling the top half of the ZZ scale bracket (part B). This section of the bracket will traverse over the fixed base bracket. This bracket will also house the read head making it the dynamic side of the scale (similar to the Z-scale).

A video of the rough milling.

Cutting a larger hole prior to boring to size. This will be the tailstock quill clamp that will allow part B to slide over Part A.
36ECC005-E1BB-4442-834A-4A421F22F726.jpeg

Using a large Annular cutter is much like a hole saw only much more precise. The center coupon can also be used later for a spacer or alike.
Here I'm boring to size.
2079CB94-A4CA-41DC-AB2C-DD6FAD2521CC.jpeg

To cut the outside profile, I set up the super spacer rotary. Once indicated the work piece is chucked from the bored hole. The coaxial indicator gets me over center. The Lagun mill has a long table allowing me to set up with out pulling the "indicated" vice off saving time.
C974FBA0-1D91-4877-9591-03F6D7B5523E.jpeg

The handle on the rotary rotates the chuck in angles, minutes and seconds. For this application I'm going for a simple rotational feed done manually.
665EDE1A-B239-47A2-85D8-9BDAFC2E83E5.jpeg

A different angle. If you look closely, you can see the reference layout lines on the clamp bracket.
CF650301-4290-466D-8427-B44485EB14E3.jpeg

A CNC machine has the ability to return to "absolute 0" if you set it up from the beginning. This allows me to remove the piece and check fit or design further. The piece can then be rechecked and machining resumed. The same thing applies to a DRO machine but you'll have to crank the table X,Y. The table in the mill still has enough room for a third set up if need be. TIP: WD-40 works excellent for machining T-6 aluminum.
9F533100-503D-4785-AEAD-0056CC16A57E.jpeg

The new HD mounting bracket and car for the screen is installed. The mounting bolts com in from the bottom of the electrical cabinet for a clean look. Two 5/16-18 holes were drilled and tapped under the wider portion of the base bracket. Notice the top cover on the headstock. This cover can be removed for inspection or repair. The whole headstock is in a hydraulic oil bath.
1B197810-C33B-437D-A02E-E2580AD05360.jpeg

The read screen is secure with no wiggle and also sits squared. The OEM bracket and arm seemed too flimsy for me. I like a solid mount while the machine is running and I certainly like things mounted squared. Both laking from the DRO PROS mounting bracket.
8068A89F-0048-4A0B-877B-17ADF1FC533B.jpeg

This shows the entire screen rotated out of the way for pulling the heavy cast top cover off.
CC50D089-34E3-4F29-A95C-0E0025BDDABD.jpeg

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Just gotta say.... with all those metal shavings I see everywhere... and that you already know about my being-Murphy story... it reminds me of long ago when I was cutting a metal track w a hacksaw. Knew to be careful of shavings and so I put on my safety glasses. Still, somehow, managed to get a metal sliver in my eyeball. Urgent care had to send me to the ER doc after picking at it awhile unsuccessfully. Loved telling one care giver after another when they berated me for not taking precautions, "But I did." lol

Bucket list:
Get metal sliver in eyeball, so deep you need a specialist and lots of digging into your eye. ✔

Keep up the awesome extreme DIY and posting about it. I just don't comment on it much because I've no idea what you're doing. lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #285 ·
Just gotta say.... with all those metal shavings I see everywhere... and that you already know about my being-Murphy story... it reminds me of long ago when I was cutting a metal track w a hacksaw. Knew to be careful of shavings and so I put on my safety glasses. Still, somehow, managed to get a metal sliver in my eyeball. Urgent care had to send me to the ER doc after picking at it awhile unsuccessfully. Loved telling one care giver after another when they berated me for not taking precautions, "But I did." lol

Bucket list:
Get metal sliver in eyeball, so deep you need a specialist and lots of digging into your eye. ✔

Keep up the awesome extreme DIY and posting about it. I just don't comment on it much because I've no idea what you're doing. lol
I have a story or two about metal in the eyes...NOT fun, but both times was with simple hand tools. I have safety glasses all over the shop, so I do use PPE. For milling like the video, it's safety glasses, a face shield. and long sleeves hahah!
The aluminum you saw in the video is more forgiven compared to steel.
Thanks for the encouraging words, but if you have questions just ask and I can explain to my best.
The secret here is, I'm just having fun in the Fallout Shelter and sharing my fun.
Glad you got your figured out. (y)
 

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And I thought PPE was just for leaving the bar at closing time. I should have considered that when creating metal strapping for the top rail of my deck. The ophthalmologist kindly took the metal shaving out a year later. Firestopper we needed you as a mentor many years ago.
 

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And I thought PPE was just for leaving the bar at closing time. I should have considered that when creating metal strapping for the top rail of my deck. The ophthalmologist kindly took the metal shaving out a year later. Firestopper we needed you as a mentor many years ago.
Hello All😀
You all sound like a bunch of rookies. In no way am I trying to brag or tell a better story, and I really am not proud to say this , you need to have your ophthalmologist number on speed dial, when I was working construction and pipe work, it was a good month if I only saw him once or twice a month.

Glad the rest of you are friends with MURPHY, if one of you would please, take his twin brother off of my other shoulder.!

Have a great day, and an awesome weekend.
 

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Discussion Starter · #288 · (Edited)
And I thought PPE was just for leaving the bar at closing time. I should have considered that when creating metal strapping for the top rail of my deck. The ophthalmologist kindly took the metal shaving out a year later. Firestopper we needed you as a mentor many years ago.
Russ, explain the PPE and last call for me. I'm slow on the uptake at times.:ROFLMAO: I'd rather be the guy that shares his failures and successes but more of the latter. I can't imagine having a shaving in the eye for more than a week (been there) let alone a year. OUCH!
Hello All😀
You all sound like a bunch of rookies. In no way am I trying to brag or tell a better story, and I really am not proud to say this , you need to have your ophthalmologist number on speed dial, when I was working construction and pipe work, it was a good month if I only saw him once or twice a month.

Glad the rest of you are friends with MURPHY, if one of you would please, take his twin brother off of my other shoulder.!

Have a great day, and an awesome weekend.
So the couple of times I had to visit the Ophthalmologist for doo doo in my eyes resulted in a divot to the eye from the imbedded shaving. One was from a coworker grinding with a 9" grinder from 30' away. I had removed my glasses to wipe my brow. I ignored this for a few days (mistake) but it got dug out. The most recent was a few years back while replacing a catalytic converter on the 40 Land cruiser. It was prior to the new shop so the work was performed on a creeper using a sawzall with safety glasses on. This one was the worst as I could not remove it myself.
Some time ago a retired paramedic friend who now works at a local ER turned me on to some "magic" eye drops.
Turns out they have cocaine as a main ingredient. They burn going in but soon renders the eye completely numb for a few minutes. It's during this time I first try a moistened Q-tip. The lights are turned off and a flash light held at an acute angle will make you eye somewhat glow making it easier to find the tiny piece of misery. I then gently approach the swarf and begin to roll the Q-tip while making contact. When I say roll, I mean rolling away Not into the eye. This has worked more times than not. Last ditch before seeking a professional is an earth magnet. I don't think I could preform this without those amazing eyedrops.

As for MURPHY, well he pops in on me on occasion but not as much as the past. Murphy now likes to cause machine failures. My wife likes to say I have an expensive hobby but I remind her its just the parts that are expensive because the labor is free.:LOL:
You all have a great weekend as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #289 · (Edited)
The DRO came with fairly long shielded cabling so I had to figure out the best cable management allowing for full travel without straining any connections.
The back of the read screen shows the two slots on the arm are used to secure the cables with zip-ties.
I still need the ZZ cable routed.
9C0690C2-7CB2-4009-BFB2-4BCC7A4B7EBE.jpeg

The tool post I use is a Quick change tool post (QCTP). The size I run is a CXA made for lathes with a swing of 13-18".
I ran the same robust CXA on the 1440 with some modifications. On this 1640 lathe the tool post T-nut had to be opened up to a 3/4-16 fine thread.
Sharing the mill table for two operations. By pushing the Absolute zero button on the DRO control screen, the machine will go to the center of the quill clamp. Just remember to pull up the Z feed or bad things will happen.
325F90B5-C812-4CB9-AC39-E6420C5E757A.jpeg

A couple more clamps to secure some cabling. I used two existing screws on the back of the taper attachment.
You can also see the rest of the taper attachment fixed to the rear of the machine. This was only to get familiar with the set up. The black linkage is normally not used when not cutting a taper.
3329EA00-AB44-44A9-ADAC-D5D819BF3057.jpeg

The tool post was mounted and clearances verified. The live center you see in the tailstock quill is a 3 M/T so an adaptor was purchased for existing tooling. This also buys me some needed clearance for the cutters.
39040D7C-F53F-4CD4-8502-82AB356A76DD.jpeg

By rotating the handle away from the operator, the wedge style tool holder releases the tool to be slid up and out ready for a different tool. The thumb screw adjuster you see is part of the tool and is set initially to the center access of the spindle bore allowing the toll to be dropped in the locked down with the red knobbed handle. These are expensive but make quick work of tool changes. The CXA size also add to the overall rigidness of the machine.
48F622FF-63DE-4B55-B7D6-3BD36C4FA491.jpeg

The ZZ axis bracket is coming along. The milled window will house the read head. The two holes on the side of the window are to access the two securing screws. The inside holes are tapped.
27C8459E-7363-4A49-A3D1-5A19EABEA9AA.jpeg

Bench test fit. The two pieces marry and if you look close you can see the end of the scale within the sandwich.(y)
69813B2B-724F-4244-961D-29F502743074.jpeg

This is how the correct orientation. It should be clear now that the base scale (right bar) is fixed to the tailstock while the (left) read head bar will glide back and forth with the quill movement.
C0457898-A689-4018-80B1-D35DD0824044.jpeg

Here I'm test fitting the tailstock quill clamp. She's coming together but at this point there's still the potential for failure.
The goal is to fix the outer dynamic read head holder to the clamp allowing the same tolerances to be maintained for the entire travel. This too requires a robust system with no flex.
48218747-4E2F-4329-AA00-B236A39EF897.jpeg

The open sandwich.
The two sections, one holds the scale, and the other the read head. You can see the spacers that allow the centering of the read head. Also visible are the fine wipes on either end of the read scale. The cool part about my design is the scale is protected by the top sliding bracket. This also acts as a cover.(y)
B3B6C1F6-8D2E-4A34-866D-57567514E294.jpeg

More to come...
 

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Discussion Starter · #290 ·
The tailstock was taped up and laid out.
7939F2D6-1D17-4EA9-9A69-22DA602E3309.jpeg

After drilling and tapping the Magnetic scale subassembly was installed and adjusted to run parallel with the ways as a reference. The same test indicator was used.
E79D641B-0E56-4AE2-AC55-37BE09681368.jpeg

Sweeping the scale.
BF20AC1C-358E-4C0F-9743-C7897FB01DA7.jpeg

Next up was drilling and tapping the end of the read head bracket. This set up worked well with a 90º angle block, a machinist square, a mill clamp and a quick clamp. Each hole was drilled followed by a blind tap then moved the saddle for the second operation. You can see the 1440 in the back round was still in service while modifying the new lathe.
In fact a couple of jobs had come in requiring the lathe.
41EE4DBA-A96F-4ACD-BFC4-F66D3B6B45A7.jpeg

Here's where some seldom used tools come in handy. My late friend Bill Myers also gifted me some screw transfer punches. They come in several thread pitches and come in pairs. These were screwed in leaving the tip protruding slightly to produce a nice mark. A special holder allows for the little hex to be engaged for threading. When not in use the little tips are housed inside the installation tool for storage.
B02EF06B-F859-43D3-8FD6-F98773671C83.jpeg

After carefully overlapping the scale with the read head bracket the quill clamp and the bracket were introduced leaving the exact locations for the required holes on the quill clamp.
271E3C6F-890B-4F37-87EA-83A234531EEA.jpeg

After drilling and counterboring for SS Allen cap screws the quill clamp was trimmed on the mill following the previously marked lines.
1DD7B63A-3573-4A4C-9105-5FEAA3802104.jpeg

Considering the thick aluminum bar required for rigidness, the overall measurement was still compact.
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The whole assembly glides smoothy and consistently throughout the ZZ-axis travel. Still need to see the readout working to claim success.

ADF25CB9-DE7D-4126-AACF-995785046FF5.jpeg

Another angle showing yet another hole drilled and tapped for a cable clamp.
03FC176B-FAF1-4187-A968-420E65AC6763.jpeg

More to follow...
 

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The DRO cam with daily long shielded cabling so I had to figure out the best cable management allowing for full travel without straining any connections.
The back of the read screen shows the two slots on the arm are used to secure the cables with zip-ties.
I still need the ZZ cable routed.
View attachment 642283
The tool post I use is a Quick change tool post (QCTP). The size I run is a CXA made for lathes with a swing of 13-18".
I ran the same robust CXA on the 1440 with some modifications. On this 1640 lathe the tool post T-nut had to be opened up to a 3/4-16 fine thread.
Sharing the mill table for two operations. By pushing the Absolute zero button on the DRO control screen, the machine will go to the center of the quill clamp. Just remember to pull up the Z feed or bad things will happen.
View attachment 642287
A couple more clamps to secure some cabling. I used two existing screws on the back of the taper attachment.
You can also see the rest of the taper attachment fixed to the rear of the machine. This was only to get familiar with the set up. The black linkage is normally not used when not cutting a taper.
View attachment 642290
The tool post was mounted and clearances verified. The live center you see in the tailstock quill is a 3 M/T so an adaptor was purchased for existing tooling. This also buys me some needed clearance for the cutters.
View attachment 642288
By rotating the handle away from the operator, the wedge style tool holder releases the tool to be slid up and out ready for a different tool. The thumb screw adjuster you see is part of the tool and is set initially to the center access of the spindle bore allowing the toll to be dropped in the locked down with the red knobbed handle. These are expensive but make quick work of tool changes. The CXA size also add to the overall rigidness of the machine.
View attachment 642289
The ZZ axis bracket is coming along. The milled window will house the read head. The two holes on the side of the window are to access the two securing screws. The inside holes are tapped.
View attachment 642284
Bench test fit. The two pieces marry and if you look close you can see the end of the scale within the sandwich.(y)
View attachment 642286
This is how the correct orientation. It should be clear now that the base scale (right bar) is fixed to the tailstock while the (left) read head bar will glide back and forth with the quill movement.
View attachment 642285
Here I'm test fitting the tailstock quill clamp. She's coming together but at this point there's still the potential for failure.
The goal is to fix the outer dynamic read head holder to the clamp allowing the same tolerances to be maintained for the entire travel. This too requires a robust system with no flex.
View attachment 642291
The open sandwich.
The two sections, one holds the scale, and the other the read head. You can see the spacers that allow the centering of the read head. Also visible are the fine wipes on either end of the read scale. The cool part about my design is the scale is protected by the top sliding bracket. This also acts as a cover.(y)
View attachment 642292
More to come...
Good morning all.
Just a short back track on Rustys PPE @ bar closing time. At least he was sober enough to be thinking about protecting one of his heads. :)
Guys if you ever wondered if God had a sense of humor. Think about this. Why did HE give man two heads, and only enough blood to operate one at a time?🤔

Awesome job Paco carry on.!👍
 
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Discussion Starter · #292 ·
Were getting close and we have an accurate ZZ-axis reading!
21530DF3-67C3-447E-8CF8-9A647FFE097D.jpeg

I mentioned that special thread transfer punch tool. This one houses five little hardened screw punches inside the body and secured by a screw cap. The smaller ens is the machined socket that threads in the screw punch. They are made by
Starrett.
E5A3F42B-362A-4E79-B4B9-03B4405E8A52.jpeg

With the last scale installed I Needed to finalize the taper attachment mount. The taper attachment came with two cap screws and two tapered pins that required drilling, tapping and tapered reaming for the two pins.
I got creative as I needed a long reach to hand drill the four holes. I machined an extension to take a smaller Jacob chuck. What could go wrong with drilling precise holes using such a long extension on a cordless drill?
A37E01A3-E23B-42A6-B3BF-4B02334C1BAC.jpeg

Nothing! Murphy stayed over at mp0611999. :ROFLMAO: The alignment was next but I changed directions and decided against the tapered pins. These pins can make it hard to separated the two pieced in the event you need to.
B8B80F90-1054-4F30-9095-1969E56B8E43.jpeg

I ended up machining down a cap screw to provide a precise hole fit using a regular reamer and turning .0002" under.
The threaded portion engages the taper attachment while the machined diameter aligns to the saddle.
50B93C52-3349-4AF4-8E5A-6B27350BCA29.jpeg

These were the tapered pins I chose to omit.
FA2BB316-EAD1-4FC6-A696-F4658025B9B1.jpeg

I also added a CR piece of steel to trigger the proximity sensor on the modified carriage stop. More hand drilling and tapping.
8AC03A8B-56DE-4925-A94F-F204A77A8BCC.jpeg

I don't think I would have changed anything on the ZZ-axis design. The last thing to finish up the ZZ was to add a little cable clamp. These were drilled and tapped to 6-32 thread pitch.
A7F93B11-F9D7-4F09-A73D-54A4E6B5D4D0.jpeg

At this point it had taken me one month to modify the electrical, switches, modify the tool post, add LED strip lights, modified the task light, add a trigger to the carriage stop and design and install the three axis DRO system. I was interrupted by a couple of small jobs but overall took my time as I was investing more coin on an already expensive machine.
The machine is still a fair amount alway from going in service. The rest of the modifications require power to the spindle to accomplish. That said, once I pull the 1440out of service I will be without a lathe until this one is compleate.

These pro machines are designed to be picked from the base. My buddy there in the back is the guy that designs the "smart controls", I simply install them.
6C45AA66-7040-4AC0-8559-7CED3101E72B.jpeg

The new lathe was set 23" from the wall allowing a push broom access. You can see the green tape on the floor indicating placement.
D4D71608-4350-4EB2-9F03-61AA34DE553D.jpeg

More to follow...
 

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Discussion Starter · #293 ·
Good morning all.
Just a short back track on Rustys PPE @ bar closing time. At least he was sober enough to be thinking about protecting one of his heads. :)
Guys if you ever wondered if God had a sense of humor. Think about this. Why did HE give man two heads, and only enough blood to operate one at a time?🤔

Awesome job Paco carry on.!👍
I get it now! :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
 

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Discussion Starter · #294 ·
The hall sensor for the tachometer need a bracket.
4753F855-FC34-4201-9D3C-C46F63FEB5B6.jpeg
\
I used the same concept for a bracket as the 1440. 1/8' x 1" flat strap was used.
516F470B-3E85-41F5-880A-DA8341A770A6.jpeg

Here the new machine is getting "auto tune" using a laptop with Hitachi software. This will set certain parameters for the best performance and efficiency on the motor. Other programs are manually set as well.
6180F29C-956F-4A9B-9F78-895325C7BB8F.jpeg

Power up the machine and all lites.
C2B68BBC-680F-413D-8133-92C634B305C5.jpeg

The new cabinet with mostly the same components as the 1440 with the exception of a new added AC choke shown above the larger VFD.
712A2DAE-DADE-445F-B050-756B1DF24490.jpeg

Before any test cutting the machine requires leveling. Not the leveling kind most folks think of, It's more to ensure the bed ways are true with no twist. You see many ships have onboard machine shops and underway the ship moves in all axis. A shipboard lathe that is anchored and properly set up will produce darn close tolerances regardless of the pitching and rolling. What I need to do here is adjust all six leveling bolts over the cast iron pucks. A precision master block level is used for this. This requires patience and fine adjustments and waiting for the level to settle. This process is very tedious but the time invested pays off when turning precise parts. This process is also influenced by ambient temperature.

Checking the headstock end of the bed ways. Those 1,2,3 precision blocks under the level were made by my late friend Bill Myers and bears his name. These blocks are so perfectly ground a lite coat of oil will allow them to cling together. This is called "Wringing".
5B16F78F-C625-4229-8064-B3F5CFE6125B.jpeg

Over view of the level at the tailstock end. Notice it's off by .0002".
B8982981-2443-4FDF-BC07-AEE5BF21116D.jpeg

Getting closer.
5191711B-31D8-4628-9998-DFF213DAF054.jpeg

Thats it, now we wait a few minutes.
94AE5882-A519-4332-8DB6-89A16158FD07.jpeg

The headstock and tailstock ends are true to each other.
79830F92-A3E1-4612-AE9D-41EDC3F1C869.jpeg

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Russ, explain the PPE and last call for me. I'm slow on the uptake at times.:ROFLMAO: I'd rather be the guy that shares his failures and successes but more of the latter. I can't imagine having a shaving in the eye for more than a week (been there) let alone a year. OUCH!
As you know at first it hurts, then it is an irritant and then you just learn to deal with it. Or maybe you have a wife that manages an ER Department. I was helping one of her nurse friends put up a horse fence. One of the metal t-posts that I was carrying fell and bounced back up and cut me above my eye. I keep working and eventually the nurse friend said we better go the ER and have it looked at. A couple stiches later I wandered home. My wife commented....you went to the ER for that.

Firestopper - Keep up the good work and all of the successes!
 

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Discussion Starter · #296 ·
Some static accuracy test.
Set up a dial indicator to check Concentricity. A solid ground test bar is chucked on one end whole the other end is supported by a center on the tailstock.

The carriage is positioned as close to the headstock as possible and a dial indicator is set up on a mag base and the indicator as close to the chuck as possible. The dials zeroed and the carriage is traversed towards the tail stock while monitoring any changes in reading.


C73ABD93-6F15-4C5D-8F2F-8B2714FEC6C7_1_201_a.jpeg

About six inches away from the chuck with no change in reading.
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About 12" from chuck with no change in reading.
0AFE43D8-A6A4-4793-96CF-6BFE40C872D3.jpeg

And at the tail stock and still no change in reading. If a minor discrepancy was noted, a fine adjustment could be made at the tailstock. By the same token, if a longer part needed a very minor taper, the tailstock could be offset to achieve this if the lathe doesn't have a taper attachment. Only minor tapers can be achieved this way.
70D6FB81-DEEA-4AFA-B1AF-5B5DBBCEEF09.jpeg

Next up a dynamic test cut of 2" CR unsupported with a 4.750" cut. The goal is to cut several passes and depth of cut (DOC) to see if if the lathe is cutting true. First pass was .030" DOC with a decent surface finish.
2BEA6838-AE14-49E3-9F26-65E89A6E3F51.jpeg

A micrometer was used for accurate readings. A variance of .0005" in 4.750" is pretty good. I could loosen the headstock bolts and use the fine adjusters to align the headstock but in reality this is damn good as ambient temp, and temp of the turned material will influence this reading.
4143317F-E4BF-4492-A70C-B519310E6AB3.jpeg

Took a DOC of .058" and got this reading. Glad I left the headstock alone. Remember the tolerance sheet I mentioned in the beginning of this post? So far the numbers are matching. (y)
85D268E2-8CF2-418C-A85B-4537F7F55271.jpeg

So far all the electrical modifications are working flawlessly. The only thing not working yet is the tachometer. I need to secure a magnet to the spindle for the hall sensor to pick up on. First hour clocked. Prior to cutting the machine was left to run at low to moderate speeds to break-in the bearings.
5FCFF7F5-87BF-40F8-BC59-5B305652ABFF.JPG

First real job was an aluminum ring to mount a magnet to read the RPM's. T-6 aluminum with a single facing pass.
The surface finish looking nice. I was turning 700 RPM, this was measured using a handheld digital tachometor.
9D90CA1B-3CFA-4A7C-A92F-7C2A4CBADA3C.jpeg

Cutting a hole to beguine boring.
8EB04B48-516F-48A2-B52D-D3751FAF5F6A.jpeg

More to come...
 

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Discussion Starter · #297 ·
The adaptor ring was coming along and the machine was running so nice. The Chinese 1440 ran good too but no real comparison to the higher quality machine.
After the Annular cut.
F583D8D0-09F6-42B9-B55D-AA2585CF2501.jpeg

After boring to size.
CEDED8FA-BCA4-4856-B700-4FB6C17B1C89.jpeg

More facing after chucking from the ID.
AAE66480-E958-4675-B171-F2516C38CD22.jpeg

The finish looks polished.
E07A72CD-5560-4E2C-AF59-3F2DB7FA5633.jpeg

The OD is also turned to final size and slight chamfers cut.
753054D2-DE00-43CA-B26D-A98E2D19180F.jpeg

The black ring is a balancing ring that mounts to the spindle. The new adaptor will mount to said ring and house two magnets 180º apart.
5BEC80F1-3065-49D7-AF37-2761A2ED5B31.jpeg

The fit was very close.
BB5E2C1E-0A8F-4945-9858-3150AD41044B.jpeg

The ring was then chucked to the super spacer rotary and two magnet pockets were milled in for a flush mount.
Also two sets of holes 180º were drilled and tapped for set screws.
07C3B7C6-928D-40D7-82D5-69B8CE2AE803.jpeg

The assembly installed and indexed. The magnets were set in flushed with red lock-tite and steaked in with a prick punch to upset the bore also locking in the magnets.
ABE34AD5-385C-453C-B361-E8C0277118C1.jpeg

The details on the steamed magnets.
5996B499-8FA9-4DF1-B998-AAA775873AD8.jpeg

More to follow...
 

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Discussion Starter · #298 ·
I never cared for the red undersized knob on the QCTP so I cannibalized an 8-ball from an old set I had. Drilled, tapped and mounted. The black ball will hide paw prints, plus it's cool. :cool:
6DB391A2-27A6-4550-B1C4-C126BD067D4D.jpeg

A short class on chucks.
Many lathes come with two types of chucks.
1) 3-jaw scroll chuck. This means that all three jaws move together as you turn the T-handled chuck key.
A good quality 3-jaw will have .0005" Total indicated runout (TIR). The problem is if you need less TIR yo need a different kind of setup. Also 3-jaw scroll chucks can't hold a part that is irregularly shaped.
2) 4-jaw independent chucks are usually 2" larger than the 3-jaw and each jaw can be independently adjusted using a T-handled chuck key.
On this lathe the 3-jaw is 8" while the 4-jaw is 10". Other means of work holding are face plates but I opted out of purchasing this. My 1440 came with one and I never needed it once. Lastly, you can use a spindle center and a tailstock center for center turning. A Milling machine will usually work for boring irregular un-chuckable work pieces.
The reason for the explanation is I own a specialized chuck that does both scroll and has independent adjustments. It's made by Bison and comes from Poland. This chuck is very expensive but is a huge time saver with repeatability in the .00002" range. I had been using this chuck on the 1440 with a D1-4 spindle mount. The new machine sports a D1-6 mount so a new adaptor plate was purchased and needs to be cut on the new lathe.
Each chuck is indexed to the spindle prior to locking in with the cam-locks. This ensures the chuck are ALWAYS mounted the same way as the adaptor plates were cut on that specific machine.

Here is the new D1-6 adaptor locked in with six 7/8" hardened pins and cam locked in. This ensures that any TIR between the laths spindle and adaptor plate machined out to zero. This is called "registering the chuck", there is also a face shoulder that need to be matched to the chucks back. The bed ways need to be covered when machining cast/ductile iron as the dust produced is abrasive. Most quality adaptors are made from this material. Once the numbers are were you want them the machine is shut down and put in neutral allowing the spindle to rotate by hand until you find the Master index mark on the spindle. A center punch is used to mark the adaptor to ensure the two marks are always aligned when swapping chucks. Now the adaptor can be removed and the chuck secured to the new adaptor.
01D687F9-ED46-4572-8DC3-E28BD0419850.jpeg

The old D1-4 back plate from the 1440 lathe.
285EBAAD-76C5-4E86-BE8C-F83F34C80F4C.jpeg

The newly registered D1-6 mounted to the Bison. The spindle side of the adaptor is precision ground to ensure a flat mating surface. Any TIR is removed from the opposite side were the chuck mounts.
72092757-CA9A-40D3-BB78-7A4ECFC525B3.jpeg

The 70 pound chuck is mounted. Notice the scroll key hole on the body of the chuck. This will move all four jaws in /out when the key is inserted. Now also notice the smaller square opening at the end of each jaw (only one visible), this allows for independent adjustment of each jaw. A test indicator was used to bring all four jaws in for near zero TIR.
D4FD1DAF-8891-4A9E-AE3B-C8F92E5FC1F9.jpeg

A solid piece of 3" round bar being cut for the next lathe project. A Spyder like the one made prior for the 1440.
B984CB1B-2C88-4F9E-A512-AF20888DF9DA_1_201_a.jpeg

Chucked up on the combination chuck for facing.
4CE549E7-6507-4522-A825-1128E04722E5.jpeg

Then turning. Here's were the 4-jaw shines. You can remove parts to flip or perform secondary operations then re-indicate to near perfect TIR.
575C007C-5A8E-45BF-99B8-D4B525D9203F.jpeg

Center drilling then step drilling and finally boring to the same OD as the spindle.
8A513A22-810D-4124-ADE5-DECF56337BA3.jpeg

A larger MT shank drill attached to the tailstock directly.
4116396D-F49C-44F4-8861-261164A5CAC8.jpeg

Got hit the shop for some work, more later...
 

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I never cared for the red undersized knob on the QCTP so I cannibalized an 8-ball from an old set I had. Drilled, tapped and mounted. The black ball will hide paw prints, plus it's cool. :cool:
View attachment 642380
A short class on chucks.
Many lathes come with two types of chucks.
1) 3-jaw scroll chuck. This means that all three jaws move together as you turn the T-handled chuck key.
A good quality 3-jaw will have .0005" Total indicated runout (TIR). The problem is if you need less TIR yo need a different kind of setup. Also 3-jaw scroll chucks can't hold a part that is irregularly shaped.
2) 4-jaw independent chucks are usually 2" larger than the 3-jaw and each jaw can be independently adjusted using a T-handled chuck key.
On this lathe the 3-jaw is 8" while the 4-jaw is 10". Other means of work holding are face plates but I opted out of purchasing this. My 1440 came with one and I never needed it once. Lastly, you can use a spindle center and a tailstock center for center turning. A Milling machine will usually work for boring irregular un-chuckable work pieces.
The reason for the explanation is I own a specialized chuck that does both scroll and has independent adjustments. It's made by Bison and comes from Poland. This chuck is very expensive but is a huge time saver with repeatability in the .00002" range. I had been using this chuck on the 1440 with a D1-4 spindle mount. The new machine sports a D1-6 mount so a new adaptor plate was purchased and needs to be cut on the new lathe.
Each chuck is indexed to the spindle prior to locking in with the cam-locks. This ensures the chuck are ALWAYS mounted the same way as the adaptor plates were cut on that specific machine.

Here is the new D1-6 adaptor locked in with six 7/8" hardened pins and cam locked in. This ensures that any TIR between the laths spindle and adaptor plate machined out to zero. This is called "registering the chuck", there is also a face shoulder that need to be matched to the chucks back. The bed ways need to be covered when machining cast/ductile iron as the dust produced is abrasive. Most quality adaptors are made from this material. Once the numbers are were you want them the machine is shut down and put in neutral allowing the spindle to rotate by hand until you find the Master index mark on the spindle. A center punch is used to mark the adaptor to ensure the two marks are always aligned when swapping chucks. Now the adaptor can be removed and the chuck secured to the new adaptor.
View attachment 642381
The old D1-4 back plate from the 1440 lathe.
View attachment 642382
The newly registered D1-6 mounted to the Bison. The spindle side of the adaptor is precision ground to ensure a flat mating surface. Any TIR is removed from the opposite side were the chuck mounts.
View attachment 642383
The 70 pound chuck is mounted. Notice the scroll key hole on the body of the chuck. This will move all four jaws in /out when the key is inserted. Now also notice the smaller square opening at the end of each jaw (only one visible), this allows for independent adjustment of each jaw. A test indicator was used to bring all four jaws in for near zero TIR.
View attachment 642384
A solid piece of 3" round bar being cut for the next lathe project. A Spyder like the one made prior for the 1440.
View attachment 642385
Chucked up on the combination chuck for facing.
View attachment 642386
Then turning. Here's were the 4-jaw shines. You can remove parts to flip or perform secondary operations then re-indicate to near perfect TIR.
View attachment 642387
Center drilling then step drilling and finally boring to the same OD as the spindle.
View attachment 642388
A larger MT shank drill attached to the tailstock directly.
View attachment 642389
Got hit the shop for some work, more later...


Paco Paco Paco
REALLY , REALLY, I can't believe you would do such a thing.

You actually got that brand new, beautiful lathe dirty, and covered in lathe chips , & shavings. How could you do such a thing? 🤔
Glad it is working so well
L8R
 
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