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Discussion Starter · #201 ·
Good Morning All
Great workmanship Paco , it's the small details that make the added value.
I know what would happen if I attempted to power tap a blind hole as I have had to remove broken taps, and or broken stud bolts from castings, and or forgings.

Everyone have a great day.
Till L8R
Good morning brother!
Thank you, I always told my son "do everything with a purpose" since he was able to understand the spoken word.
Man, I have broken my share of taps and drill bits over the years. I'm sure I still have a few to break in the future! :LOL:
If you'r not making mistakes, you'r not doing anything!
I hope you have a wonderful day!
Paco
 

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Thank you Sir!
My whole life I have gravitated to older solid mentors. It seems I'm running out of them as I'm getting older myself.
I have learned many things over the years from these true patriots, both shop and non shop related. I miss them all!
Thank you for the kind words, I just want to reach out to anyone whom might be interested in this type of activity.
My other passion is mountaineering and long distant hiking. This fuels my soul as well, but my body tells me otherwise.
I have much more to share in terms of projects and hope I don't ever come across as a blowhard.
God bless.
Paco
Paco
The blowhards are the ones that think they have done it all, better than any one else, in a shorter amount t of time.
In my opinion, and that is only a opinion. There are no Master Machinists, no Master Carpenters, No Master Welders, etc.
We can all learn something new every day, and the day comes when we dont learn something new, that is a wasted day.
As I have stated before, there are no perfect jobs, or projects, when we look back, there was always something that could have been done differently, and the average person never seems to notice all the minute details. That's OK as the one doing the fabrication knows.

As the saying goes " When the student is ready the Master will appear". Maybe some of us are just ready.

Keep on Keepin on while the health allows ,as I still enjoy some of the projects, I find they are not as easy as they once were.
Till L8R
Lil Brother.
 

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Dad gum it Dually
Close the North door on the state line. Maybe, Nebraska will stop sucking wind out of Oklahoma, it's been blowing thru Ks long enough.
Thanks Dually!
L8R
 

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Dad gum it Dually
Close the North door on the state line. Maybe, Nebraska will stop sucking wind out of Oklahoma, it's been blowing thru Ks long enough.
Thanks Dually!
L8R
Storms a brewin'... that gulf air is almost constant here
 

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Discussion Starter · #205 ·
Paco
The blowhards are the ones that think they have done it all, better than any one else, in a shorter amount t of time.
In my opinion, and that is only a opinion. There are no Master Machinists, no Master Carpenters, No Master Welders, etc.
We can all learn something new every day, and the day comes when we dont learn something new, that is a wasted day.
As I have stated before, there are no perfect jobs, or projects, when we look back, there was always something that could have been done differently, and the average person never seems to notice all the minute details. That's OK as the one doing the fabrication knows.

As the saying goes " When the student is ready the Master will appear". Maybe some of us are just ready.

Keep on Keepin on while the health allows ,as I still enjoy some of the projects, I find they are not as easy as they once were.
Till L8R
Lil Brother.
Well said brother! The day I stop learning is the day I draw my last breath.
 

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Discussion Starter · #206 ·
Good morning and happy hump day for some of you. :giggle:
A small project to share from the 2018 archives.
The plastic lathe knobs never had the right feel so I made some from aluminum. With the new 5C scroll chuck I wanted to play with the new work holding system.
I also made a new bolt to simplify the carriage stop. The original set up required a metric Allen wrench from the bottom to clamp down the carriage.

A new bolt was turned and threaded from tool steel. The small section of rod at the tail stock chuck is a home made dead center to support the new bolt while cutting threads. The 5C scroll chuck is perfect for this type of work.
I went 17 years without this type of chuck so it was a treat to use.
92B83F66-D7A5-4AA6-B235-CF3927EB1F7C.jpeg

The carriage stop was carefully measured drilled and slightly counter bored. The new hole has to align with the lower clamp threaded hole.
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The new bolt threads in by hand.
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A smaller 5/16' section of tool steel was also threaded while the new bolt was drilled and tapped for the new handle.
The bolt was carefully tightened prior to marking the hole needed for the handle. This ensured the handle would point outward when locking down the carriage. While the new bolt was in the cooler block, it was turned 90º for a second threaded hole.
FD164B77-8C3E-4BB8-984E-010EBBCA7A05.jpeg

Two grub screws were added to ensure the lower clamp would engage evenly.
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All the plastic knobs were replaced with longer aluminum knobs for an improved feel.
Knuraling.
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Drill and tapped followed by a taper prior to parting.
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Some of the new head stock knobs. The longer ones are for the transmission levers. The smaller is for feed selection.
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Longer new were also turned for the tail stock locks and spindle power lever.
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On the tail stock locks. you can also see the new knobs on the carriage.
92FE1C2C-5C86-4315-BF7B-4B104F9C43B3.jpeg

I really found that 5C scroll chuck to be a long overdue addition.
More to follow...
 

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Discussion Starter · #207 ·
The headstock levers
0FD71860-342A-4038-8578-D0E25CB65392.jpeg

Carriage levers.
06CCB9B3-9A93-47EB-A26E-ECBDBBB958A7.jpeg

The last modification was a swart shield for the bed gap. Made from a small piece of aluminum, it really helps with clean up.
The removable bed gap allows for a larger piece (short) to be turned.
3BDE8D58-5856-4AD9-A4D6-9B6D837CA23D.jpeg

A custom bent piece of aluminim.
431A4654-7BD4-4066-8FE6-5CD5502D89AD.jpeg

The ramp to the right allows for the chips to be swept down to the chip pan/tray. The carriage still clears the shield when working close to the headstock.
17F7E266-6EF3-46D1-AD61-C91C5247EBAC.jpeg

Done...
 

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Your work is flawless and always top notch. My table saw project pales in comparison. I needed the ability to move it from a shed on a gravel driveway. Easy, add some wheels. I took two wheels from an old push mower and mounted them to the angled frame of the table saw. Added 4x4's to the other two legs so it was level. Problem is I need an alignment on the wheels as they "toe in" considerably. Might have to rotate them just to get another year out of them.
 

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Your work is flawless and always top notch. My table saw project pales in comparison. I needed the ability to move it from a shed on a gravel driveway. Easy, add some wheels. I took two wheels from an old push mower and mounted them to the angled frame of the table saw. Added 4x4's to the other two legs so it was level. Problem is I need an alignment on the wheels as they "toe in" considerably. Might have to rotate them just to get another year out of them.
I needed wheels on my small, but too heavy to carry, air compressor. So, for the axle, I used a 2 foot 1/2 inch extension that I never use. Mounted two old hand dolly pneumatic tires that always go flat, but it's an air compressor. And everything is held on by worm-gear hose clamps. And I cut holes anywhere I could in the frame of the compressor to remove weight. I cut 'em with a grinder with the precision of a blind drunk. It's all good.

Firestopper's just an overachiever ;-) (y) (I'm joking, I love his DIY write-ups. DIY to the max!)
 

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Discussion Starter · #210 ·
Thanks for the compliments brother. Most everything I do is manually built so nothing is perfect but I do try.
It seems pneumatic hand cart tires might roll over gravel a bit easier. I’m sure straightening out the toe in/out condition will surly improve the performance with less trenching on loose gravel.
Is your table saw cast iron old school heavy or lighter aluminum?
 

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Thanks for the compliments brother. Most everything I do is manually built so nothing is perfect but I do try.
It seems pneumatic hand cart tires might roll over gravel a bit easier. I’m sure straightening out the toe in/out condition will surly improve the performance with less trenching on loose gravel.
Is your table saw cast iron old school heavy or lighter aluminum?
They say pictures don't lie, so I would say your stuff is pretty much perfect.

Cast iron old school. Good thing I have a skid steer to fill in the trench after I move it. It might actually drag easier than using my wheel attachment. I tried to use what I have for tools and materials and failed miserably.
 

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Discussion Starter · #212 · (Edited)
So the wheel assembly I use on my RescuExpress dolly utilizes Care free micro-cellular tires. They hold no air but mimics a pneumatic tire. The axel size is 5/8”. I wanted a carefree tire on the rescue cart to prevent having a flat when the units were needed. I think you can source them for around $30 ea. I buy them by the 100’s dropping them down to $18-19 ea. I have used them for shop projects. I also replace all my shop dollies with the 10” care free and the 16” care free for the bigger dollies. Never a flat👍
 

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Thanks for the compliments brother. Most everything I do is manually built so nothing is perfect but I do try.
It seems pneumatic hand cart tires might roll over gravel a bit easier. I’m sure straightening out the toe in/out condition will surly improve the performance with less trenching on loose gravel.
Is your table saw cast iron old school heavy or lighter aluminum?
I do wanna thank you for your comment recently "if you aren't making mistakes, you aren't doing anything." I hate screwing up. Hate it. I just hate losing. BUT, when I do, I remind myself of that line. Because you know who never makes a mistake? People who never do anything. I guess it's the same as that "fortune favors the bold" comment. Anyhow, it was nice to hear the DIY-to-the-max guy say it as well. I feel validated - lol. Even telling the wife, see this guy makes mistakes too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #214 ·
Not able to quote on my phone but I would consider the 10” care free tires for your table saw being that it’s heavy.
 

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So the wheel assembly I use on my RescuExpress dolly utilizes Care free micro-cellular tires. They hold no air but mimics a pneumatic tire. The axel size is 5/8”. I wanted a carefree tire on the rescue cart to prevent having a flat when the units was needed. I think you can source them for around $30 ea. I buy them by the 100’s dropping then down to $18-19 ea. I have used them for shop projects. I also replace all my shop dollies with the 10” care free and the 16” care free for the bigger dollies. Never a flat👍
Me too. That's how I ended up with so many flat pneumatic tires laying around - lol. Anything not carrying air gets no air tires. Vehicles excluded, of course. I got a bunch years ago for like $20 a tire on Amazon. Replaced all my dollies, carts, etc.

Edit: Wow, just checked and man have they gone way up. Anyhow, it was these:
Farm & Ranch FR1030 10-Inch No-Flat Replacement Turf Tire for Hand Trucks and Utility Carts
 

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Discussion Starter · #218 ·
Me too. That's how I ended up with so many flat pneumatic tires laying around - lol. Anything not carrying air gets no air tires. Vehicles excluded, of course. I got a bunch years ago for like $20 a tire on Amazon. Replaced all my dollies, carts, etc.

Edit: Wow, just checked and man have they gone way up. Anyhow, it was these:
Farm & Ranch FR1030 10-Inch No-Flat Replacement Turf Tire for Hand Trucks and Utility Carts
Carefree : Hand truck Tire - Jiaxing Carefree Caster Co.,Ltd.

Marathon is another option: Marathon Flat-Free Tires :: America's Flat Free Tire Leader
 

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Discussion Starter · #220 ·
Another restoration project was a 72" box and pan (finger) brake.
Backstory.
Around the time I was building the lathe cart, I was also in a small bidding war with some pawn shop (based on his online name) over said brake. I used the same Government surplus auction site which the Delta finishing machine was sourced.
The brake was located about 80+ miles north of me in Gilbert Az. It was being offered by the City of Gilbert with no other history or background. From the photos, the brake looked complete and the online auction went on for just over a week. I had seen several finger brakes over the years but they always seemed to be missing fingers or other parts like counter weights etc. The unit is American made and I was guessing from the 60's or 70's. Made by Chicago Dreis & Krump. Model BP0614-6, S/N 316138. A quick call to the manufacture with the model and S/N reviled it was born in 1978 and sold to the US Air Force. Now I really wanted to but it! The action ended at just under $1,500 including taxes and fees. I made the the quick drive to Gilbert to take possession.

The screen shot of the bid winner.
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Not knowing what resources I had to load this in Gilbert, I took a chance and used my 14K dump trailer.
All auctions clearly state you must arrange your own loading. In the past, I have always been able get help using a fork lift to load. After some polite discussion, the grumpy city employee agreed to load the machine onto the trailer. I tried to advise him on how to pick the machine as I had all the rigging equipment I though I might need with me. He was not having it and basically picked it from the top apron. At this point I just wanted to get out of his grumpy sight.
Notice the top apron is no longer sitting over the adjusters.
ADC0649B-AAEB-4637-B450-DEBC8A16E55D.jpeg

Made it home without drama.
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All the fingers lined up. 6", 5". 4" 3" and 2" fingers. Notice the green finger extension 8th from left. I would learn
later this was the only finger extension that wasn't bent.:mad:
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The OEM label along with the City of Gilbert property tag.


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Unloading the machine using fork extensions and chain.
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Relocating the top apron.
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So far everything looked straight on the main body.
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The hardened ware bars also were in decent shape with no major chips or missing chunks.
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After stripping some paint to access the hardware it became clear the information I had sourced from the manufacturer about the machine being built for the USAF was confirmed by the original blue paint.
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This restoration ran at the same time of the lathe cart build and the purchase of a new bigger lathe so some photos will be out of order but worth the share IMO.
I will also add this will be a longish post as a ton of work was performed to bring this brake back to service.
More to follow...
 
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