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Discussion Starter #1
Ok the prototype is done.






Obviously this isn't stainless as of yet. I still need to test this out for a while(don't want a swinging arm scratching up the paint). I also need to select the style of stainless.


The options are 303(most expensive), 316(middle of road), and 304(least expensive). I also need to do a quick CAD layout and e-mail to the fabs my company does business with to get some quotes. I can make these myself, but consistency is an issue with equipment I have available at work.


The steel will be 1/8 x 1inch so they should be quite strong and durable. For the pivot, right now I'm looking at a 3/8" clevis pin with cotter pin. This is for future maintenance of the pivot. When it either begins to stick or corrode, remove clean, lube and reinsert(or just replace). These pins are almost $5 a piece, so I'm exploring other options at the moment.


For cost, I'm hoping to keep these cheap. I can't give a real price yet since I don't know machining costs as of yet, but it's a simple piece. Cost of machining stainless tends to be a little more pricey though. Quantity will make a huge price differential, so demand will also dictate the price as well.





More to come......



Edited by: Victory Red
 

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Victory Red said:
Ok the prototype is done.


Obviously this isn't stainless as of yet. I still need to test this out for a while(don't want a swinging arm scratching up the paint). I also need to select the style of stainless.


The options are 303(most expensive), 316(middle of road), and 304(least expensive). I also need to do a quick CAD layout and e-mail to the fabs my company does business with to get some quotes. I can make these myself, but consistency is an issue with equipment I have available at work.


The steel will be 1/8 x 1inch so they should be quite strong and durable. For the pivot, right now I'm looking at a 3/8" clevis pin with cotter pin. This is for future maintenance of the pivot. When it either begins to stick or corrode, remove clean, lube and reinsert(or just replace). These pins are almost $5 a piece, so I'm exploring other options at the moment.


For cost, I'm hoping to keep these cheap. I can't give a real price yet since I don't know machining costs as of yet, but it's a simple piece. Cost of machining stainless tends to be a little more pricey though. Quantity will make a huge price differential, so demand will also dictate the price as well.





More to come......<IMG id=chkImg1 onmouseover="this.style.cursor='hand'" onmouseout="this.style.cursor=''" alt="Click on image to open in new window" src="smileys/Approve.gif" name=chkImg2>




When it come's to Stainless Steel the expert you need to talk with is Mackin.


PM him I am sure he can set ya up...............





T
NYEdited by: hoot
 

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I like!!!



Everytime I load my ATV, I feel like my life is in the hands of some Chevy Intern Engineer!!! Heck with somethin' like this I should be able to load 'em two at a time!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Prairie Goat,


It's comments like yours that make me a little leary. There is always the 'liability issue'. Even though I know you're comment was just in fun.


I've learned some things about the tailgate setup. On both ends to hold the current straps are just welded on nuts to the sheet metal. While these straps will likely hold a lot of weight, there is a chance of someone overloading and ripping the the metal around the bolt.


I'm designing these so no one get's shocked by a string breaking, not to add beef to the tailgate capacity. EVERYONE MUST REALIZE THIS before I get these out to the interested parties.


If these for some reason begin to fail, you'll be able to visually see a stress point, this is not the case with the OEM's. That's my main reason for producing these.
 

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The biggest design variable is if some one drops a large load on the tail gate or some times I jump my four wheeler off an embankment into the back of my truck. It's crazy people like me you need to be concerned about. You could calculate the static strength of the strap but its that unknown load that will get you.
 

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Seems to me the problem would not be with the strap but the mounting points. Would it not be the same stress and the same possible failure with the stock cables??
 

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Discussion Starter #7
yes there would be, but the reason for the replacements is because of several reports of the cables corroding and snapping(not at the crimp points or the mounts) but the actual cable failing. This would eliminate the chance of that happening, but I don't want to give anyone a false sense of security that these actual make the tailgate hold more weight. These won't corrode, fray, or rust apart like the factory ones can.
 

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VR,


If I were worried about liability (and I certainly would be somewhat apprehensive as you are), I'd be tempted to include some type of warning (note, sticker, or ???) about not exceeding the GM Recommended Load Capacity on the tailgate. By the way anyone know what the weight rating is for the tailgate? I don't recall seeing it in the owner's manual, but I seem to remember seeing something about 500lbs many years ago. With many of us loading 600lb+ machines (not to mention the weight of the roundboy at the helm!) this hopefully is not the case.
 

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My truck only has 22000 miles on it and its barely over a year old, cables are starting to bubble, I will pay for the top quality of good material Rick. Dont worry about a cheeaper this or that, make them solid, if its good product price wont be a huge issue...as long as its reasonable. 50.00 is very reasonable for the added security, ever priced getting your tailgare fixed becuase the bumper creased it????


Eric
 

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Rick (Victory Red) ...


For your info: I just purchased a replacement set of tailgate cables. I first went to the local CarQuest store but was told they were parts that had to come from my GM dealer. Just to let you know, the GM part number for these cables is 88892973. They cost $15.09 EACH which with our state tax brought my bill for 2 cables to $32.29. I agree with those above who recommend going with high quality materials. The design you have pictured is much like the ones that came on my '78 Jeep J-10 pickup. I kept that truck for 24 years (let her go in early '02) and never had to replace the tailgate supports. Needless to say, even with a new set of cables on my truck, I am interested in purchasing a set that I know will not have to be replaced in a couple of years!


Jim
 

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I had an '89 Chevy Fullsize that had the factory hard straps. They were cad plated steel. Then I got a brnd new '93. I believe it came with the wire rope style. Since I had both trucks still I swapped the better ones before I sold the older ones.

Guess you can't by the old style anymore even if you had an '89 and wanted original equipment.

Victory Red... I'll buy a set in a heartbeat.Edited by: hoot
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Well, cost is an issue, but in all honesty I hope to keep these sets(both of them at $40ish or less). A 3/8" Clevis is strong enough for a pivot point both weight wise and wear and replaceable, a big want that I think these should have. The thickness of the steel and width are more or less being dictated by space. 1/8" x 1" doesn't seem like much but next time you're at your hardware store find the steel section and try flexing it at a 7" or 9" inch length. It won't happen easily.


Anyhow for those of you not in the know, 304 stainless is the exhaust we have. It's also most common in food grade applications. The quality of the steel also affects the machinability. Here's a quick rundown of the steel grades I can get:


AlSl 303
<UL>A chromium-nickel stainless steel modified with selenium, sulphur, and phosphorus to improve machinability. It is corrosion resistant to atmospheric exposures, most organic and inorganic chemicals, dyes, nitric acid, and foods. It is manufactured by the electric-furnace process and meets the exacting requirements of the aircraft industry. This type stainless steel is often used for parts requiring machining, grinding, or polishing where good corrosion resistance is necessary[/list]
<UL>AISI 304
<UL>A low carbon stainless steel which provides good resistance to corrosion. Carbide precipitation is minimized during welding operations. Often used where corrosion resistance and good mechanical properties are of great importance. Frequently used in the food and beverage industry which requires a high degree of sanitation and cleanliness.[/list]
<UL>AISI 316
<UL>Offers higher corrosion resistance than Types 302 or 304 due to the addition of molybdenum. This type is also highly resistant to pitting and withstands corrosive actions of acids, dyes, and salts used in the process, textile, and pulp industries. Applications include the manufacture of pumps, valves, textile and chemical equipment,[/list]
<UL>[/list]
<UL>[/list]
<UL>304 is the least expensive, 316 adds around 20% cost of materials and 303 around 60% to the cost of material. [/list]
<UL>At this point my only real concern is the machining costs. Once I get some time to talk with our various fabs and figure in the final price point I'll be ready to go. [/list][/list][/list]Edited by: Victory Red
 

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I would be interested in the straps also as I load my 600lb plus wheeler often also and all I can think about is the the cable snapping. count me in on a set.
 

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How about 15-5 PH ? I believe it machines well and its strength and corrosion resistance are excellent. Might be more expensive though.
 

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Victory Red,


Count me in! Fifty bucks a set is a great price for the peace of mind they will provide.


Tim
 

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Put me on the list.... I can flex the tailgate on the passenger side enought to see the strap has let loose at the crimp...... I need some now.... Still under warrenty so i hope they can cover me till I can get these.....
 

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I will buy a set also when they're ready...well worth the peace of mind when loading the four wheeler....thanks
 

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They would give me peace of mind. I think 304 stainless would be excellent. In the worst element it would just get a mild surface rust that could be wiped of with a plastic scrubbie and wd 40 if it bothered anyone. Looking foward to avaliabillty.
 

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The old ones they used on the C/K's were mild steel with a dull cad plating.
 
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