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Discussion Starter #61
Again, this thread is not dead I'm just busy farming.



I am through the harvest season so back to business of truck maintance. The truck ran ok, but had a couple of issues that need to be addressed. First, I run the cheap B20 Biodiesel you can buy here in Oregon, the only issue is it's a fuel filter clogger. I had a couple of hard starts in the mornings where the truck ran rough for a bit. Once warmed up it would run fine. I just need to replace the fuel filter.


Second, the truck drives great when loaded. But unloaded, is a bit of a different story, especially on the freeway. Any bump or road variation and the truck starts to wonder. Too much so for me so it's time for a fix.


The front end needed to be gone through cleaned up and all checked out, so those plans are on the fast track. I have ordered up new front shocks. It looks like it is still sporting the originals from 2001. After checking the right to left steering travel, I ordered up a pair of Monroe 555949 steering stabilizers with 12.25" of travel it more than covers the 11.625" of travel I was able to measure. I will need to fabricate the brackets to mount them up as I could not find a bolt on kit for this rig. An earlier check of the wobble on the front tires told me the king pins were ok and no need for new but I will double check that. I may end up needing to replace some ball joints once I tear into it a bit more, but I'll leave that for further investigation. Also on the program will be to clean up and protect against the rust, check the front brakes, put some fresh paint on parts that need it and a good coating of grease all around.


I'll have more later. Now it's time for a little football and a few more days of RnR
 

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Discussion Starter #62
I went back and noticed on this thread that I did not do a pictorial of "how to" on my fuel filter setup and my solution. Well, here is much more complete "how I did it" for those out there that also may have the same fuel filter system as myself.


I have a Davco 210 Fuel filter system. This particular model is no longer made and there is a reason for it. As you can see from the setup, the fuel filter is positioned in such a way that when you go to change the filter there is no way to not spill at least little diesel. Another problem, is the filters for this system are no longer available or are VERY expensive. If I was rich I would replace it, but like most people, I'm on a budget and I just need this to work, and it does work well so here is the solution. This is how I delt with the Davco 210.


First you start with a Napa filter # 3337 (Same as Wix 533337). This filter comes with a petcock on the bottom. Originally, this filter was intended to be mounted base side up and the petcock down. As you can see in the pictures below, I have turned it upside down. First step is to drain as much of the fuel out of the filter as possible. For me, the easiest way was to remove the ducting from the intercooler. This gave me access to a drain plug on the right of the filter assembly (noted in the third pic with the wrench with the pink ribbon). Capture this fuel in a clean container for use later as it is clean because it has already gone through the filter. Once the fuel stops flowing, it's time to remove the filter. I found that if I wrap a towel or rag completely around the main Davco body, I was able to capture almost all of the remaining fuel using this method. You will also need to have a second container handy for the spent filter because there is still some fuel in it. Next step to make the Davco work is to remove the washers from the main mounting bolts. You can still see the outline of where they were when I removed them previously. Time now to put the new filter on. Make sure the drain plug is tightened back down if you have not done so already. Clean off the flat matting surface of the Davco unit with a clean rag. Take the new filter and rub a little clean diesel on the rubber gasket before you install it. For some reason, this filter is a bit hard to get started on the mount so you will need to push down with some force for the threads to make contact. Just tighten the filter firmly as you would any other filter. The final step is to add the clean diesel you saved back into the filter through the small hole where the factory petcock screws in. I will say a very small funnel will really help adding the fuel. I just used a small pitcher and poured in the fuel very slowly. Again use the rag around the filter to capture any overflow. You will likely still need some additional fuel (not saved) to completely fill up the filter. For me, the petcock that came with the original filter would stick up too high, so I changed over to a brass 1/8 NPT plug (See the third pic with the wrench with the orange ribbon). One of the really great things I like about this filter set is the aspect of adding fuel back into the filter. When you go to start the vehicle after, there is a small bit of coughing, but nothing too severe and usually starts pretty easy.



I hope someone out there sees this and realizes their problem is solved.



Thanks for looking.
 

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Discussion Starter #63
Next step in the Dorthy's evolution is a front end overhaul and general fixing. I knew it had to be done and this harvest season was proof. Truck was just fine when fully loaded, but empty it was another issue. Biggest problem was on the freeways (when you least want a problem), it would get some serious "death wobble" when you hit any kind of rough patch. So here is what is on order over the next several months:


New brake pads
New front brake cans

New shocks
Custom steering stabilizers
remove as much rust as possible and as much of the old green paint.
General cleaning and repainting where possible or necessary.
Rust cleaning and abatment

Maybe new kingpins (tbd)



So it begins. Not completely looking forward to this project but it has to be done. First step was to jack up and support the front end and remove the drivers side wheel. After trying for a while with my 3/4" sockets and a breaker bar, the lug nuts were unforgiving. I was convinced I was going to break something so I needed bigger tools. I ordered up a new 1-5/16 deep lug socket of the 1" drive variety and a new 1" drive breaker bar. I needed a 1" drive socket for my large air impact driver anyway so the breaker bar was just for good measure. I still ended up needing a 5 foot extension to the 42" breaker bar to break free the lug nuts. Of course there was lots of rust. This is going to take a while..... Pull out the popcorn and get a beer.
 

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Discussion Starter #64
Stepping back just a bit, I learned a lot about the HUEI pump in the Cat series engines. Not that I wanted to. Every once in a while I have a hard time starting Dorthy. Usually in the mornings, so I had just been attributing it to poor fuel. In Oregon they have a bio-diesel producer that gets a pretty significant tax break from the state so they are able to sell their product at a much better price. The fuel is 20% bio and is anywhere from .20c to .50c cheaper than standard diesel. I'm a fan of bio-diesel so I would buy it anyway. It is a little "dirtier", in that the bio-diesel process just has unique properties to it not found in other diesel fuel. As long as you keep your fuel filters clean, you should not have a problem.


Anyway, I made some ramps out of some old 2X material I had lying around. I did this to get better access under the truck before I started this project so I could give it a good pressure washing. I ended up leaving the truck up on the ramps overnight. The next day when I came back, the truck just would not start! Cranks over like crazy. I finally gave into my better judgement and sprayed a small amount of ether into the top of the air intake. I know, I know, never use ether (starting fluid) on a diesel. There was a bit of excitement out of the engine once the either reached the pistons, but nothing. Also scared me a bit.


Over the weekend I do some serious research.


The main reason never to use ether in a "grid heated" intake system is now clearly obvious to me. Once the ether reaches the grid heater that is now heated up red hot, there can be an explosion. Grid heater parts all over the inside of your engine..... DOH! This did not sit well with me over the weekend


Also about the HUEI pump. This is basically a hydraulic pump. It takes engine oil from the sump, pressurizes it +/- 800 PSI at start up and up to nearly 3000 psi while running. This hydraulic pressure is used to open and close the injectors on your engine. So, no oil = no hydraulic pressure = no starting...


Once I got back to the truck, the first thing I did was to jack up the truck and then lower it down slowly off the ramps. Next thing was to get access to the grip heater and see if I had done any real damage... Alas, none, whew! Ok, I may not have blown up my engine. I also pulled the valve cover and did an inspection of the valves to see if there was any apparent damage, again no, another very positive sign. While I have these parts off, I threw a little paint at them, then put everything back together. When I had the truck up on the ramps the oil level was within the range so I thought everything was fine in that department. But after learning about the HUEI pump more I made sure the oil level was right up to the full mark. Now, the moment of truth.... Just a few cranks and Dorthy fired right up. No damage and ran just fine. A short test drive just to confirm. Yup, everything seems just fine. No damage done.... Boy that makes me feel better.


Bottom line. On the Cat 3126, C7 & C9 make sure your oil level is topped off. If your engine does not start for some strange reason, check the oil level first. Especially if you are parked on an incline...
 

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Discussion Starter #65
Back to the project. New shocks came. They look smaller and in fact the diameter is smaller, but they are the right ones. Took off the old ones. They go down... But not up on there own. Also it sounds like they have water inside of them. I'm thinking new shocks was probably a good call. Note the size difference, but the new one does have the plastic retainer still on it. Once removed it was the same length as the old one.


BTW, can someone tell me how to rotate the pictures so they are oriented correctly? I searched on this forum and cannot find the answer. The appear fine on my computer and pre-post, but then look incorrect once posted.
 

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Discussion Starter #66
Here is a pretty good example of the rust I have all over my truck. One is the base plate for the brake shoes along with the cam adjuster and the other is the hosing for the "S Cam" and holds the air brake canister. Sorry no pic of the rotten air can. I will eventually take these two parts and some others and have them sand blasted and painted before going back on the truck.
 

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Discussion Starter #67
Part of my goal is to remove as much as possible from the front side of the frame to clean everything up and do some rust abatement. The top shock mount also needs to get sand blasted and cleaned up. So I started removing parts....


To get to the bolts for the upper shock mount, I need to get access to the inside of the frame but there is a lot in the way. So the first thing to come out is the air compressor and the power steering pump that is attached to it.


Compressor will get cleaned up and painted as usual in my work. So will the exposed engine, once I get all the oil residue off. There was a lot more oil before I pressure washed.
 

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Discussion Starter #68
Once that was out I was able to get in a little deeper. I also removed the motor mount after supporting the engine. Then a plate that was bolted inside of the frame rail which held the other side of the motor mount.


Finally access to the shock mount to remove it. The darn shock mount was riveted on! Doh! Ok, drill out the rivets and then finally bust them off with a cold chisel. I will have to bolt the shock mount back on. Maybe I will square the holes and use carriage bolts. Other option would be some button heads. Either way there is a space issue to allow room for the shock to move freely so I will have to figure that out later. But here is where things stand at the moment.
 

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Great project!
:thumb:
 

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Discussion Starter #70
I'm back and the project lives on. It's been in process just no time to sit down and post up...

I removed the support bracket that holds the tilt cab down so I could clean it up and repair some rust damage. But first I wanted to attack the frame on the passenger side. Before I can re-install the cleaned up bit, I want to clean up the frame, add some rust stopper and give the paint some time to dry and harden up.

So, usual deal. Remove rust with a wire wheel brush and then rust stopper. Throw some red oxide primer at it, and then some gloss black. I'm only going to do a small part on this side at the moment. I'll attack the rest of this side once the drivers side is complete.

Here is my moment to come clean about paint. I just use off the shelf rattle can paint... Why, because it's a nearly 20 year old work truck. I'm just trying to stop the corrosion. If the paint gets chipped or starts to wear, I just pull out the rattle can and touch it up. $5.99 and it looks great again... for a while.

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Discussion Starter #71
Brake backer plate.

Here are a few pics of the plate in process. First is when it was removed. Next is after I hit it with a wire brush. I didn't like how much of the decay and cancer was left, so I pulled out the sandblaster and hit it. It's just a cheep Harbor Freight blaster. My 60 gal compressor has a bit of a challenge keeping up as well. You must have a moisture capture device on the air line to the blaster or the whole thing will clog up. Last pic is it all cleaned up and a layer of Permatex Rust Stopper. I added several layers of paint after. As with most parts I clean up, all the threaded parts get chased with a tap as well to clean out any rust. I did discover late, that I can still buy the part and frankly that is what I probably should have done. Still turned out pretty good and I'm ok bolting it back onto the truck.

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Discussion Starter #72
I finally took the wheel spindle off. It too got cleaned up, part of it blasted and several coats of paint. I have new king pins to go in when I finally put it back together. I think they had been done fairly recently as they were in pretty good shape. But if I am going to all this trouble, I'm changing the king pins. It's a safety thing and I do not plan on being this deep into the truck ever again.

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Discussion Starter #73
Drivers side of the frame got cleaned up same as the passangers. I had thought I would take of the leaf springs as well, but I got a little truck fatigue and just cleaned it up as best as possible before paint. It did not have much rust on it anyway. I did however remove the U-bolts holding on the springs to the axles. As you can see it went up to just before the front spring perch. There forward the paint was in good shape so I just eventually went over it with fresh black. Here are some pics of the frame

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