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few questions first is gonna sound stupid this is my first winter with my diesel and i thought i read some where about our trucks getting louder with winter fuel vs summer fuel is this possible or is it all in my head? because my truck sounds more dieselier lol i dont know how to explain it really it seems like it got louder than it was a few weeks ago

my other question is i thought i read on here about people using "power service" fuel additive i bought a liter of it and it says on the bottle that it raises cetaine 4 points and adds lubrication should i run this in my fuel and can i use it in replacement of 2 stroke oil? thanks
 

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From what I've been reading, I will keep using 2 cycle oil until temps stay below 32F, then i will go to Powerservice additive. Powerservice doesnt provide the lubrication that 2 cycle oil does. I am also gonna keep the tank topped off to prevent moisture build up.
 

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Don`t think fuel has anything to do with rattle on first start. Just alot louder till warmed up. A few weeks ago AM temp was 10 C now 0 C .Get used to it,your neighbours will love you lol. I use power service grey bottle in summer,picked up 2 mpg with it. C an`t help with 2 stroke question,don`t use it.
 

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few questions first is gonna sound stupid this is my first winter with my diesel and i thought i read some where about our trucks getting louder with winter fuel vs summer fuel is this possible or is it all in my head? because my truck sounds more dieselier lol i dont know how to explain it really it seems like it got louder than it was a few weeks ago

my other question is i thought i read on here about people using "power service" fuel additive i bought a liter of it and it says on the bottle that it raises cetaine 4 points and adds lubrication should i run this in my fuel and can i use it in replacement of 2 stroke oil? thanks
There is no 1 answer fits all here so you should SERIOUSLY educate yourself regarding diesel's characteristics,especially in the cold Canadian Winter or you will be so SOL.LOTS of info right here,do a search,but IMHO,being in the excavating biz for 38 years with all types of diesels,both mechanically and electronically injected,here is what I do for lubricity and to prevent gelling---EVERY fill-up gets Schaeffer's 2000 Fuel Treat---it is an emulsifier type[dealing with water].Top off your tank before it gets too low,preferably at the end of the day to prevent overnight condensation.Lots of good fuel treatments that made it to the top 10 right here in our ''diesel additive study''[believe it's now a ''sticky''--do the search],2 stroke oil is not really something recommended by most,myself included.
 

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Lots of good fuel treatments that made it to the top 10 right here in our ''diesel additive study''[believe it's now a ''sticky''--do the search],2 stroke oil is not really something recommended by most,myself included.
Umm.... in that "Diesel additive study" you speak of. Walmart TCW3 2 stroke mix is rated #7 in the top ten. Power service is #10. Many, many people including me, here and on many other diesel boards recomend TCW3 oil for our older trucks.
It is a good inexpensive additive during warm weather.
However.
It wont protect from Gelling in cold winter temps. So you should use a good anti gell additive. I use PS white bottle every fill up in winter and add 2 stroke @ 1/2 oz per gallon fuel, every other tank. In winter i dont like my tank to be less than 1/2 full to help prevent condensation.
 

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You can still use the oil and the PS will help with gelling...
I would NEVER rely on PS for anti-"gelling" in severe winter conditions. I had PS treated fuel "gell" 3 times in 24 hours during an "Arctic Express" event in IL/MI back in the winter of '96 when the ambient temp fell to -20*F with a wind chill near -55*F and stayed there for four days.

My Class 8 road tractor/trailer first quit in Effingham, IL., then Kalamazoo, MI, then again 50 miles farther at Jackson, MI. My tow & heated shop "repair" (thawing only) bills were about $1200 within 24 hours. I was already running mega-doses of PS in the fuel before the winter blast hit. And at the first two shops I was re-dosed with copious amounts of PS. The third time it "gelled" it was within within 50 miles of leaving Kalamazoo while idling at a truck stop in Jackson. That's the shop where I finally found out about parafin being added to ULSD. The fuel wasn't gelling. It was wax coming out of solution and clogging the filters. As a traditional high sulfur fuel anti-gel additive PS had no ability to keep parafin in solution at those temperatures.

The shop manager at Jackson split a half gallon of Howe's Diesel Fuel Treatment.. 1 quart in each 100 gallon tank... and sent me back out into -40*F wind chill, where I ran to Detroit, then Green Bay and finally south toward Biloxi, MS. It was another 36 hours after getting the Howe's before I got into temperatures above 0*F and not one instance of "gelling". Howe's has been my diesel additive of choice ever since, even here in Florida in my 6.5. The 34 gallon tank uses 6 oz's of Howe's per fill up.

If you buy a minimum of 6 bottles of Howe's (3 gallons), fill out and mail in the on-line registration with a copy of your receipt, Howe's will reimburse any fuel "gelling" related tow bills up to $500.

I know this thread is mostly a conversation about lubricity additives. But when I see the words "Power Service" and "gelling" in the same sentence it gets me cranked up.. to the tune of $1200 needlessly pissed away plus what I paid for all the ineffective PS. They may have finally reformulated it for ULSD.. I dunno. But they will never get one more dime from me. ~FH
 

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Get a receipt everytime you fill up just in case their fuel is gelling.
 

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Most stations that blend fuel in the winter state what temperature the diesel is good down to. I just filled yesterday and that fuel is good to -10F. On Nov 15 the fuel will be good to -25F around here. So unless we get record lows no worries about the fuel gelling. Usually where people run into issues are when they fill up with nonblended diesel and then drive somewhere cold. I've never had issues with the fuel gelling here in MN and I've driven in -30F weather and most winters see at least -20F.

BTW, I use Powerservice (for lubricity) for the simplicity. It tells me right on the bottle how much to add. But I probably don't need to add much because all diesel at the pump in MN is B5 (5% biodiesel) which is excellent for lubricity.
 

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Being in northern Ontario, he should have very few gelling problems as fuel should be blended properly unless a cold snap hits early or the distributer still has old fuel.
Gelling is more of an issue where the temperatures usuually arn't that cold and a sudden dip causes issues.
I agree with the others, that the louder rattle is most likely from colder start ups. But I do notice that mu cummins is a little noisier in the winter months.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
ok well i will continue to use the 2 stroke should i just bring back that bottle of PS and forget it? it was a white bottle
 

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i usually put both, in the power service is going to condition the fuel, 2 stroke gives better lubricity and i notice a bit more power. If I'm putting on miles, I go every other tank
 

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Umm.... in that "Diesel additive study" you speak of. Walmart TCW3 2 stroke mix is rated #7 in the top ten. Power service is #10. Many, many people including me, here and on many other diesel boards recomend TCW3 oil for our older trucks.
It is a good inexpensive additive during warm weather.
However.
It wont protect from Gelling in cold winter temps. So you should use a good anti gell additive. I use PS white bottle every fill up in winter and add 2 stroke @ 1/2 oz per gallon fuel, every other tank. In winter i dont like my tank to be less than 1/2 full to help prevent condensation.
Ummm--yes I knew that--did you also see that it's NOT COMPLIANT with ULSD.So unless you have your own little refinery somewhere making old school full caffeinated diesel,it begs the question--WHY?????? I actually ran it myself for awhile in my Dmax until I found out some of the side effects from prolonged usage.
 

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ok well i will continue to use the 2 stroke should i just bring back that bottle of PS and forget it? it was a white bottle
Only if you enjoy gelling up on the side of the road.Like I already told you,you should have an anti-gel in EVERY fill where you are.If you think you can rely on diesel being already ''conditioned'' all the time at the station,you are sadly mistaken.Cheap insurance to the alternative.
 

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I would NEVER rely on PS for anti-"gelling" in severe winter conditions. I had PS treated fuel "gell" 3 times in 24 hours during an "Arctic Express" event in IL/MI back in the winter of '96 when the ambient temp fell to -20*F with a wind chill near -55*F and stayed there for four days.

My Class 8 road tractor/trailer first quit in Effingham, IL., then Kalamazoo, MI, then again 50 miles farther at Jackson, MI. My tow & heated shop "repair" (thawing only) bills were about $1200 within 24 hours. I was already running mega-doses of PS in the fuel before the winter blast hit. And at the first two shops I was re-dosed with copious amounts of PS. The third time it "gelled" it was within within 50 miles of leaving Kalamazoo while idling at a truck stop in Jackson. That's the shop where I finally found out about parafin being added to ULSD. The fuel wasn't gelling. It was wax coming out of solution and clogging the filters. As a traditional high sulfur fuel anti-gel additive PS had no ability to keep parafin in solution at those temperatures.

The shop manager at Jackson split a half gallon of Howe's Diesel Fuel Treatment.. 1 quart in each 100 gallon tank... and sent me back out into -40*F wind chill, where I ran to Detroit, then Green Bay and finally south toward Biloxi, MS. It was another 36 hours after getting the Howe's before I got into temperatures above 0*F and not one instance of "gelling". Howe's has been my diesel additive of choice ever since, even here in Florida in my 6.5. The 34 gallon tank uses 6 oz's of Howe's per fill up.

If you buy a minimum of 6 bottles of Howe's (3 gallons), fill out and mail in the on-line registration with a copy of your receipt, Howe's will reimburse any fuel "gelling" related tow bills up to $500.

I know this thread is mostly a conversation about lubricity additives. But when I see the words "Power Service" and "gelling" in the same sentence it gets me cranked up.. to the tune of $1200 needlessly pissed away plus what I paid for all the ineffective PS. They may have finally reformulated it for ULSD.. I dunno. But they will never get one more dime from me. ~FH
''you go or Howes pays the tow''.--Used to use it for years,NEVER had a gelling problem,great stuff.Switched to Schaeffer just for convenience since that's the oil/grease I roll with.Also no problems. Sorry to hear your dilemma.
 

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Only if you enjoy gelling up on the side of the road.Like I already told you,you should have an anti-gel in EVERY fill where you are.If you think you can rely on diesel being already ''conditioned'' all the time at the station,you are sadly mistaken.Cheap insurance to the alternative.
We don't have the gelling issues you do. We seem to understand that its going to get cold and the fuel will have issues otherwise. Our fuel doesn't have near the wax that yours does either.
 

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Its not that TCW3 oil is not compliant with USLD. It is an emission issue. TCW3 is not approved for the newer diesels with all the emission stuff. It is not recomended for newer trucks. Also Dmax do not like it. But for older IDI trucks like ours it is fine.
Also It gets cold where I live. We have had the lowest temps in the lower 48 many times. Seen it as cold as -56F here. I pretty much use white bottle PS all winter. My truck will start in temps as low as -25F Not including chill factor. With no problems or my block heater being plugged in.
I dont have any problems in winter time with PS. Never had any gelling problems. Main reason i use PS is its is readly avaliable where i live. Other additives like ones mentioned are good too but are only available in my area at truck parts houses at preimiun prices. With the high price of fuel. I like to keep operating costs down
 

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Its not that TCW3 oil is not compliant with USLD. It is an emission issue. TCW3 is not approved for the newer diesels with all the emission stuff. It is not recomended for newer trucks. Also Dmax do not like it. But for older IDI trucks like ours it is fine.
Also It gets cold where I live. We have had the lowest temps in the lower 48 many times. Seen it as cold as -56F here. I pretty much use white bottle PS all winter. My truck will start in temps as low as -25F Not including chill factor. With no problems or my block heater being plugged in.
I dont have any problems in winter time with PS. Never had any gelling problems. Main reason i use PS is its is readly avaliable where i live. Other additives like ones mentioned are good too but are only available in my area at truck parts houses at preimiun prices. With the high price of fuel. I like to keep operating costs down
Well,I'm certainly not a fuel/oil engineer,just a guy with lots of diesel experience but I've never heard of your emission arguement before.Do you have any proof of what you're saying?
 

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Well,I'm certainly not a fuel/oil engineer,just a guy with lots of diesel experience but I've never heard of your emission arguement before.Do you have any proof of what you're saying?
Do you have any proof?
 

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I live in the middle of Canada, it gets cold here in the winter, diesel fuel is blended and sold accordingly.
I've never had any problems whatsoever with fuel gelling, I've used two stroke oil in my 6.5 year round for 10 years, no problems.

I also used Power service, white bottle in winter, grey in summer, I'm quite skeptical that the white bottle does anything to prevent fuel from gelling, I always carried it in the back of the truck and at about -30C it is frozen solid in the bottle, so I cannot possibly imagine how it could be of any help in the tank.
 
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