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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I am a diesel noob who has decided to build a Toyota FJ40 with a surplus 6.2 that I recently bought in a surplus auction. I am building it from the frame up and would like to do it right the first time....but still be frugal.

I just got the engine and I think it looks pretty good, my plan is to tear it down to the bare block and overhaul it with new rings, bearings and gaskets. Obviously while it is apart I will check for cracks and any other defects. My question for ya'll (this first of many I'm sure) is, do you have any reccomendations for things to replace/upgrade before I put it in?

Bear in mind part of the reason I got a 6.2 is cost. I am not looking for performance upgrades, just reliability and things that are much easier to go ahead and do before installing the engine.

Should I go ahead and have the IP rebuilt now of should I wait until it is installed and see how it works and if it works just go with it. What is the life expectancy of an IP. I doubt this engine has more than 50k on it and has an overhaul tag on it already.
 

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Nice score on the motor! You may want to just check the overall condition of the motor and install it, I've got 325k and 375k on both my 6.2's, and as far as I can tell, neither of them have had anything other than a few gaskets, water pump or lift pump replaced since they were new.
 

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if you want to do it on the cheap side, i say just run it without changing anything. i wouldnt worry about the ip, see how it works and fix it when/if it needs it. if you arent going to be beefing up the power, you dont have that much to worry about. good decent engine imo.
 

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Oh man you had me so jealous for about 10 seconds. I thought you got the whole Humvee...:D
 

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Mad (Sean) Max
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As for the IP, it's real hard to say with the military IP's how long they'll last. You never know what's gone through them. Many of the military mechanics who post here say it's not uncommon to replace an IP every 10 000miles or so. In civilain use they generally last 50-100k miles
 

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Yeah, the military likes to run all types of fuel. I wouldn't be surprised if your engine had paint thinner, kerosine, waste oil, Mountain Dew, or ear way ran through it. If it were me, and I'm cheap, I'd just run it and fix problems as they present. These engines are relatively simple to diagnose, and equally easy to repair.
 

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Yes, don't tear it down if there's nothing wrong with it. Most of the surplus engines were rebuilt in 2004 when TACOM ordered a giant rebuilt program for all 6.2's in service. That is why most have a 2003-04 rebuild tag. Whether they were in running condition or not at the time of pulling, is another story. But it's been proved by many people the reason most 6.2's were swapped out was simply for 6.5 upgrade. Yes, even if there was nothing wrong with the engines. Government spending never made much sense to me.

It's a crapshoot. But most are good runners.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for all the replies. I wish they were selling complete HMMWVs! I guess I will just put it in as is and see how it runs. I will post pics later so you gus can see it. It does need some bolts for the oil pan so I will probably go ahead and pull it off and take a peek from there. I got is for $255OTD so I think that was a petty good deal. Any opinions on 12v vs 24v? I don't think 24v will be that big a deal since I am building it from the ground up.
 

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Yeah, the military likes to run all types of fuel. I wouldn't be surprised if your engine had paint thinner, kerosine, waste oil, Mountain Dew, or ear wax ran through it..
I'm just sitting here, eating my breakfast muselix and this comes up.
LIVELLI, GET TO KENTUCKY AND CLEAN MY KEYBOARD!!!
 

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Mad (Sean) Max
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Why go 24v? The only reason the system was 24v in the first place was so NATO could jump them and they could jump NATO equipment. 24v stuff is harder to find and a bigger pain in the ass. Some do report that the 24v starter spins like a bastard tho and makes for easier starts.
 

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But then the rest of the vehicle would need to be 24V. While a 24V starter can be had thanks to the CUCV, other things are harder to find. Remember, this includes dash & headlights, fuel sending units, horn, etc.

The IP is easy to convert. You need to get a 12V topper from another IP for the shut off and cold advance. The other IP issue is the transmission pickup will be different, and you may need to cut/melt the plastic dealie off to mount a civvie vac advance in place of the electrical relay (TH400).

As for the other things, there's a few to replace but it shouldn't be a total deal breaker.

Make sure you get the proper 3rd starting bracket to mount the starter to the block! HMMWV crate engines don't come with one.
 

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Mad (Sean) Max
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Understood. i would say tho that since it's only the shutoff valve solenoid that's 24v on the IP it's pretty simple and cheap to replace with a used one from a wrecker or someone on this site who may have an old damaged IP that would have a good solenoid. And you probably want to replace the glowers as well. Fairly cheap and you know that heading into winter you have good ones. Also gives you a chance to get self limiting plugs and a manual glow setup
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Ok, I'm convinced. Swap the glowplugs, replace the IP top, put in oil pan bolts, put it in and run it. I guess I can run a seperate circuit for my 24v lights.
 

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They didn't use an actual 24v starter.
Or IP solenoid.
Or 24v lights.

Only used the 24v charging system with a standard 12v starter and a voltage resistor to drop the voltage down to 12v for all the standard GM electrical.

If you remove the voltage reducer and hook your batteries up in parallel instead of in series all the 24v corrosion nightmares go away. 24v SUCKS! You get far more corrosion issues throughout the 24v system when compared to a standard 12v system, you have to run in-line voltage reducers to power any 12v accessories, and you can't just go to Autozone and grab an alternator if one of your 2 big-case alts burn up. Best thing I EVER did to my M-1008 was tossing the 24v parts and converting it back to 12v. I will say, though, that the direct drive starters would spin a LOT faster off the 24v you fed 'em, but the gear reduction starter that came stock on all '95 and up 6.5's is better than every direct-drive starter ever built, 12v or 24v......
 

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Mad (Sean) Max
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Umm I'm pretty certain that the starters on all military vehicles are 24v. Not certain since I don't own one but from all the reading done here and the little bit at steel soldiers it certainly seems that way. Everything else is reduced back to 12v but the starters are 24v. EXCEPT the HMMWV which DEFINITLY has a 24v shutoff solenoid. Different connections and everything.
 

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Umm I'm pretty certain that the starters on all military vehicles are 24v. Not certain since I don't own one but from all the reading done here and the little bit at steel soldiers it certainly seems that way. Everything else is reduced back to 12v but the starters are 24v. EXCEPT the HMMWV which DEFINITLY has a 24v shutoff solenoid. Different connections and everything.
You may very well be right about the HMMWV info, I never get the chance to turn wrenches on them :( But all the M series trucks used the same starter that our civilian versions did, only the charging system was 24v. I had a M-1008 until 3 years ago, and that thing had the absolute worst electrical issues of any vehicle I've ever driven. After my 2nd year fighting the electrical system, I removed the voltage reducer and the 2nd alternator and swapped the battery connections to parallel and never had another starter or alternator burn up in that thing again. They would have been fine if they were straight 24v, but that mix-n-match voltage system they had was a major failure.

mhidpa- you may be able to just replace the coil in your pump, gotta get ahold of a Stanadyne dealer and find out.....
 

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Mad (Sean) Max
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Sweep, I'd look into the 24v starter thing if I were you. Literally everything I've read about the military trucks is that they have 24v starters. This includes everything I've read on steelsoldiers. I'm pretty sure those guys know their military trucks quite well. I think if you had a 12v starter on your M1008 it must have been swapped over by someone who didn't know. Could have been the reason you kept burning up starters. BTW there is a fellow in my area that sells military takeouts. I always call him when I need a part just to see what his price is (always too high) and when I had starter problems this summer I called to see if he had one. He had a dozen starters, none were 12v, and I know that he would have tried to make the sale if he could.
 

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Sweep, I'd look into the 24v starter thing if I were you. Literally everything I've read about the military trucks is that they have 24v starters. This includes everything I've read on steelsoldiers. I'm pretty sure those guys know their military trucks quite well. I think if you had a 12v starter on your M1008 it must have been swapped over by someone who didn't know. Could have been the reason you kept burning up starters. BTW there is a fellow in my area that sells military takeouts. I always call him when I need a part just to see what his price is (always too high) and when I had starter problems this summer I called to see if he had one. He had a dozen starters, none were 12v, and I know that he would have tried to make the sale if he could.
From what my starter/alternator rebuilder says, there is no difference between the "24v" starter in the M-1008 when compared to the stock starter on any 1984 GM 6.2L. All the internals are identical. And the starters weren't the big issue with the M-1008, it was the 2nd alternator always burning out, which is different from it's 12v counterpart. The primary alternator (the 12v one) never caused the issue.

All that being said, it really wouldn't matter to me, 'cuz if I got another M series GM diesel, it would be immediately converted to both 12v and the newer model gear reduction starter, the direct drives were junk from day none, and 24v is too uncommon to be useful in the states.
 

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Mad (Sean) Max
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I agree that 12v is prefferable to 24v in our marketplace. Just not enough stuff dold in 24v to make it worthwhile. And it is nice to be able to boost my wifes car if I need to (haven't yet but just wait) i do have a hard time believi ng tho that the 24v starter and the 12v starter are the same internally. Maybe it's just the solenoid that's different i don't know but there must be a fundamental diffeence in an electric motor that usess twice the volts as another one.

As for direst drivestarters being junk. i had a DD starter when I first got my truck. It lasted for all i know the life of the vehicle before I got it, probably not but it lasted. If it hadn't been for a day of my truck sitting on the road in -30C/-20F for 10 hrs then trying to start with marginal plugs for 1/2 hr I would probably still have that starter. The Gear reduction that I got was OEM off a wrecked '92 6.2/6.5 can't remember which and it lassted 2 years after it's initial 20+ years so I can't blame it either, but the DD starter was good to me for a long time, and if it wasn't for my abuse of it I'm certain it would still be my good bud
 
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