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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all. I think I have myself confused here, so I need some input. Truck & 5th-Wheel are in sig. Ok.....I'm going to hit the Cat Scales next week. I've never done this before & not sure of the proper way to go about it. Over thinking it & got myself all confused - LOL. I'll be fully loaded up as if I were heading out for the weekend. Should I pull on with my whole setup, then pull off drop the 5th-Wheel & pull the truck back on ?? Will this work for me or does it even matter ?? Really curious as to what the pin/hitch weight is on this trailer.

Oh.....I just got off the phone with B&W & they said 175 lbs. for the hitch. Will this figure into the equation ??

Thanks in advance for replies, I know you all will set me straight !!
 

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It's best if you can play around at the scale. The best possible info you can get would be for the weight at each wheel of both truck and trailer when hooked up, plus the weight of each wheel on the truck when not hooked up. You don't need the weight of each trailer wheel when unhooked as it will be the same as when hooked up. When hooked to the truck, the truck takes some of the trailer weight at the pin and when unhooked, the front landing gear take that weight, so the weight on the tires remains the same, at least for sake of this discussion.

Unfortunately, you can't get individual wheel weights at a CAT scale. The best you'll be able to get will be axle weights - kind of. I would go about it this way: Drop the trailer and put the truck on the scale so just the front axle is being weighed. Record that weight as "A". Then pull the whole truck on the scale and record that weight as "B". To get the truck's rear axle weight, subtract "A" from "B". Now, with the trailer attached, pull just the front axle of the truck on the scale and record the weight as cited above. Then the whole truck and record that weight. Again, to find out the weight on the truck's rear axle, subtract the front from the total weight. Then pull the trailer on the scale so only it is on the scale and record that weight. Then pull the trailer forward enough for the front axle to be off the scale and record that weight (I'm assuming it's a tandem axle and not a tri-axle trailer). That will give the weight on the rear trailer axle, and subtracting that weight from the total trailer weight, will give you the weight on the front trailer axle. Subtracting the truck's rear axle unloaded weight from the loaded rear axle weight will tell you how much the trailer pin weight is. Adding the pin weight to the trailer weight will give you actual total trailer weight.

So, why do you need to know all this crap? It will tell you if you are within the load ratings for both truck and trailer and give a good indication if the load on the tires is within specs. Note that this is not as good as if you could have weighed each wheel separately, since weights on individual trailer tires are almost never equal. If you could jockey the trailer around so you could each wheel on a corner of the scale and get it weighed, it would be great, but I doubt that will happen, and I'm not sure how accurate the scale would be. There are people who travel to trailer rallies to perform this function with individual scales. It can be an eye opener. On paper, my trailer has more tire capacity than needed, but in reality, one of my tires is actually over the limit by a few pounds.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks Tom. My 5th-wheel toyhauler is a triple axle.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
You might take a look here: How To Weigh | CAT Scale

Makes it pretty simple/understandable, doesn't it?
Thanks for the reply Ron !! That truck & 5th-wheel chart is how it's done. I actually called the place after I posted on here & that is exactly how the guy explained it to me. Sounds simple enough. He said it's gonna cost me a whole $12.50. I can handle that.

Pull on scales.
Truck front axle on pad A.
Truck rear axle on pad B.
5th-wheel triple axles on pad C.
Pull off scales & unhook trailer.
Pull back on scales truck only.
Truck front axle on pad A.
Truck rear axle on pad B.
Done.....!!
 

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That's how I do it. Those cat scales have different pads for a reason. Subtract unloaded rear axle weight from loaded rear axle weight, unloaded front axle weight from loaded front axle weight, add those two together to get pin weight. Add pin weight to trailer axle weight to get total trailer weight. Those CAT scales make it so easy. Just FYI, and you may know this already, the CAT scales list front axle as steer axle and rear axle as drive axle.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
That's how I do it. Those cat scales have different pads for a reason. Subtract unloaded rear axle weight from loaded rear axle weight, unloaded front axle weight from loaded front axle weight, add those two together to get pin weight. Add pin weight to trailer axle weight to get total trailer weight. Those CAT scales make it so easy.
Wow.....Excellent info Gunrok. The reason for my trip to the scales is to find out the pin weight & total trailer weight. Thanks a bunch, appreciate your input !!

Just FYI, and you may know this already, the CAT scales list front axle as steer axle and rear axle as drive axle.
Yes, I noticed this on their website. Front axle/rear axle is just so much easier for my simple mind - LOL.
 

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I hate to bust your bubble, but I can tell you right now that you will be overloaded with that truck and trailer combination. Let me know what the numbers say, but my guess would be the GVW of the truck(loaded) will be between 11,500 and 12,500# and the RAW of the truck(loaded) will be over 7000# Both numbers are over the manufacturers specs.
Frank
 

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In oregon, the DOT scales run even when the weigh station is closed. And use is encouraged. So... I just drive out to a local closed weigh station and take my time weighing. I move out of the way if a trucker comes rolling in to go over the scales. Don't know how other states handle closed weigh stations.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I hate to bust your bubble, but I can tell you right now that you will be overloaded with that truck and trailer combination. Let me know what the numbers say, but my guess would be the GVW of the truck(loaded) will be between 11,500 and 12,500# and the RAW of the truck(loaded) will be over 7000# Both numbers are over the manufacturers specs.
Frank
Hate to disappoint ya, but you're not busting my bubble. I'm pretty damn sure I'm overloaded, hence the trip to the scales to get the exact numbers. I'm certainly not wasting my time & money making a trip to the scales just for the heck of it. I'm not gonna make it over there this week tho, weather has been real crappy here the past couple days. I'll wait until it's a bit nicer outside. I'll definitely post a pic of the two weigh tickets after I have it done. Real curious as to what the actual numbers are. Hopefully not to scary - LOL !!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
18K GVWR 5er behind a SRW truck. Yikes!

Dude, your way over weight...
Ya think ?? I'm pretty damn sure I am & I want to see the actual numbers. Being overloaded is never a good thing, I just hope the numbers aren't to scary. We'll see.....
 

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SpitzoMT,
I'm glad that you realize that you are over, a lot do not. I don't blame you for waiting for better weather, no sense in yucking both truck and trailer up when you don't have to. I am curious as to what your number are. My trailer has a 16,400# GVWR and truck is 11,400# GVWR that is why I know what the weights are. with 2 of us in the truck, and about 1/2 tank of fuel in the aux tank and the trailer loaded for a long weekend with about 30 gal of fresh water 23,500# gross, 12,500#trailer, 6600# rear axle, 4400# front axle. This put the truck about 8000# and the trailer about 15,500# Now that I am full timing I am right at the 16,400 and around 11,500 on the truck, I haven't been to the scale since I became a full timer, but will at the first opportunity.
Frank
 

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Don't feel too bad when you find out you are overloaded. When I hook up to my 11,500 5er fully loaded with fuel and extra water, and either a boat on the back or a horse trailer with two horses I max out at 26000. For legality sake, we will leave it at that, because any heavier and I am out of compliance for my driver's license. At any rate, my rear axle typically scales between 6400 and 7000 depending on how much fuel I have in my aux tanks. My front axle is usually around 4500 which puts my gross at close to 11,500 for a 9200 lb rated truck. In my opinion, the biggest risk is the tires. Keep them inflated to max or slightly above and check for heat build up. I am running 285's rated at 3750lbs each for extra capacity. Make sure the trailer brakes are in good working condition, because without them you are in big trouble. When I tow doubles, all of my brakes work.
 
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