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Discussion Starter #1
Man that was the hardest 2 bolt job that I have EVER done.

Getting the bolts to thread took forever, THEN I could not the get outlet fitting on without TAKING THE PUMP OFF again. Getting the bolts to thread again the second (really probably the fourth or so) was even worse.

I am embarrassed to say, but it took me like 4 hours total (including time to go inside to eat lunch so I did not set the truck on fire).

I am not the best mechanic, but that made me wish I would have paid someone else to do it.

Does anyone know the going rate (how many hours they charge for that job)?

Just had to vent!

adam
 

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well, I will give you apointer.
use a feeler guage to push the rod back up into place, no need to remove the plate to do it. you then slip the pump in and pull the feeler guage out from above it.
make sure the motor is turned so the cam is not pushing down agaisnt the rod.
thats probably why you could not get the bolts started easily. then start the bolts, just a few turns. now you can wiggle the pump around while connecting the hard line.
easy job, maybe hour tops and that is screwing around a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
blalley;1572046; said:
well, I will give you apointer.
use a feeler guage to push the rod back up into place, no need to remove the plate to do it. you then slip the pump in and pull the feeler guage out from above it.
make sure the motor is turned so the cam is not pushing down agaisnt the rod.
thats probably why you could not get the bolts started easily. then start the bolts, just a few turns. now you can wiggle the pump around while connecting the hard line.
easy job, maybe hour tops and that is screwing around a bit.
I had to loosen the plate to push the rod back, but did not take it all the way off.

At one point I had the cam lobe down and figured out to turn the crank to free up the pushrod. Maybe I did not get it perfect the second time and there was not as much play to get the bolts started. Plus i had it attached to the outlet line already which limited the mobility of the pump.

I could probably get it done in an hour now that I have a "feel" for it.

Thanks for the tips.

adam
 

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when I did the fuel pump on my 350 the rod kept falling out of the block, just put a dab of grease on the end of it and stick it back in the hole. that will hold it up there for you to work and get the pump on.

I just put new brake shoes, wheel cylinders, springs, and wheel seals. only took about all day, it really sucks when a little project turns into all day ordeal.
 

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Welcome to the forum! :welcome:

Well, first of all I'm glad you got it done... :)

The hourly labor rate for mechanical work in my area is right around $65/hour (of course the mechanic doesn't see all of that :rolleyes:) usually with an hour minimum. If you took it in and had it done, I'm guessing they would've charged about $90-$100 (although that includes the pump and shop expenses like rags, grease, etc.). Once you get good at it it takes about a half hour to change the pump.

I usually pull the plate off and pull the pump off of that. Just seems easier that way to me... Might be easier another way for somebody else. Timewise it doesn't seem to make much difference.

Just remember that it is better to take a long time and get it done right than to hurry and do it wrong. Also remember that now that it is done you don't have to do it anymore... :cool2:

Welcome again! :welcome2:
 

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When I did mine it was not hard.
I had the motor mounting stuff gone, the block was jacked and I pulled the hole thing off because it looked like the plate was leaking.
It would have sucked if I did it with the motor mount stuff in there with the block down.
When I changed mine I replaced the fuel line and added a 0.3mm trash screen before the lift pump and a $3 wall mart G3 carb fuel filter after to pre filter the junk before it gets to the $26 sheet metal brick on the fire wall.
Shops cost to much, if I would have taken my truck to a shop to get the rear main seal, Main bearings and connecting rod bearings replaced it would have cost at least $800.
One thing I try to use as rule of thumb is the labor is going to be about 10x the cost of the part when its some thing engine related.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
High Sierra 2500;1574108; said:
Welcome to the forum! :welcome:

Well, first of all I'm glad you got it done... :)

The hourly labor rate for mechanical work in my area is right around $65/hour (of course the mechanic doesn't see all of that :rolleyes:) usually with an hour minimum. If you took it in and had it done, I'm guessing they would've charged about $90-$100 (although that includes the pump and shop expenses like rags, grease, etc.). Once you get good at it it takes about a half hour to change the pump.

I usually pull the plate off and pull the pump off of that. Just seems easier that way to me... Might be easier another way for somebody else. Timewise it doesn't seem to make much difference.

Just remember that it is better to take a long time and get it done right than to hurry and do it wrong. Also remember that now that it is done you don't have to do it anymore... :cool2:

Welcome again! :welcome2:
Thanks!

Does feel good to be done. I drove it about 60miles yesterday with no problems other than it being a loud slow pig. It's a M1008 CUCV on 36" buckshot mudders.


I had the motor mounting stuff gone, the block was jacked and I pulled the hole thing off because it looked like the plate was leaking.
It would have sucked if I did it with the motor mount stuff in there with the block down.
I know. I don't have huge hands, but mine are still jacked up from sqeezing them past the manifold.

adam
 
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