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Discussion Starter #1
Well, congratulations, you have finally done it. You went out and purchased the truck of your dreams. After painstakingly choosing your color and options, you found the truck you have been wanting for years. You stare for hours at here smooth lines, and spend most of your weekends walking around it with a cotton cloth wiping off finger prints that you only imagine are there. You pop the hood and suddenly it becomes a main stage of inactivity for you and a few close friends to gather around and sip a few cold ones. You are then envy of your friends and neighbors, you have achieved greatness! But wait….. Now you realize that it requires care and attention, not just a regular bath, but more. A lot of people are not sure what to do and may not know how to do it or when it needs to be done. If you fall into one of those categories, read on. I have wrote this just for you.


Today’s vehicles are more dependable then ever before and are designed to run for many miles with little or no maintenance, or at least that’s what the manufacturer would like you to believe. A good maintenance habit is vital to the life of any machine and these trucks are no exception. The fluids must be maintained to ensure that the metals they protect have the proper protection. The filters must be maintained to ensure that the fluids last. The appearance must be maintained to ensure that you don’t have to transplant your driveline into another truck because your body fell apart. All of this maintenance is very simple to do and can be completed by the average DIYer.



The following maintenance schedule was arranged using information from GM, OEM manufacturers and personal experience. It does not represent the standard and should only be used as reference, you may choose to alter it depending on you use of the vehicle. Depending on the year of your truck and the emission system you have, some of the information given may or may not apply. I will also include a suggested list of things to carry with you in your truck for an emergency situation. You will notice that the schedule only goes up to 100,000 miles. After you reach that, refer back to the first service and start over.





5000 miles
<DIR>



Change oil and filter, lubricate suspension. Will be referred to as LOF for future


Inspect tires for correct air pressure and signs of damage. For aggressive tread patterns, it’s a good idea to rotate them at this time. Highway tires can go 10,000 miles between rotations


Replace external spin on transmission filter in Allison equipped trucks.</DIR>


Drain and refill rear axle lube if equipped with the G-80 Eaton differential. It is only required at this interval to remove break in material.


PMI. (preventative maintenance inspection) This includes but is not limited too a complete general inspection of lights, possible fluid leaks and overall vehicle condition. Also, inspect and top off W/W solvent, brake fluid, power steering fluid, transmission fluid, coolant, transfer case, and front and rear axles. Check and replace air filter as needed. Check serpentine drive belt for fraying or cracking. Check and adjust air pressure in tires and don’t forget about the spare. Check and clean fuel cooler of debris. Inspect condition of wiper blades and replace as needed. Inspect batteries and cables for signs of leakage, tightness. Use a spray on type off sealer to help prevent corrosion buildup and keep it cleaned off using a baking soda and cola mixture or a spray style cleaner. GM feels that leaking batteries are partly caused from the posts overheating from poor contact between the cable and battery, make sure this is clean and the cable is tightened properly.








10,000 miles
<DIR>



LOF


Tire rotation and inspection


PMI


Lubricate door hinges, la
 

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Nice work!
 

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Very useful. My only comment is that you did not mention t
he types of fluids to be used in the Allison
transmission. It would be good to have some guidence
as to which type of fluid to use, mineral or synthetic,
and the benefits.
As a retired professional engineer, I am very impressed
with this forum, and in particular your posts.
 

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This is great - it'll make a huge difference for me - I appreciate the time you put into this.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
My goodness, I knew I would miss something, I am editing to add the transmission fluid data.


Eric
 

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Eric,


Great info! Thanks so much, this is a great help.



You mention front differential fluid, but not when to drain/refill. What is the recommended interfal for that?


Thanks,


John
 

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You said inspect the passenger compartment filter on 01 and 02 only. Did GM decide owners of newer trucks don't need to breath clean air and eliminated the filter for 03 and 04?
 

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somekevinguy said:
You said inspect the passenger compartment filter on 01 and 02 only. Did GM decide owners of newer trucks don't need to breath clean air and eliminated the filter for 03 and 04?

No room for them on '03s and up due to dual climate control.
 

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dmaxalliTech,


You said lube the splines at the tranny, I didn't see what to lube with, are there instructions anywhere, what if you have a long box with the carrier in the middle?





Thanks,


Bert
 

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Eric, whas the skinny on front wheel bering lubrication. I haven't been able to find anything about lubricating them. Thanks.
 
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