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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I tried to search this, but didn't really get the answer to my question. I've changed oil in the rear differentials of many trucks/cars in the past. In the case of changing the axle seals in my truck (sig.), I button everything back up, then jack up the opposite side as far as the jack will go and add oil. Once I let it back down, I check the oil level and then just drive really slow for the first few miles. I usually drive in the ditch by the road, so as to slosh the oil into the side needing oil.

Since the fill hole bottom appears to be below the axle tube, does the axle shaft, itself, carry the oil out to the bearings in the hub? Can someone explain to me just how this works? Am I filling these diffs. the right way? Apparently it's working because I've been doing it for many years without trouble, but is there a better way? I've even done the same thing on the dump truck when I changed oil in it, but it's more difficult to lift that up and feel safe doing so when the axle is at that sort of angle on a jack.

SnowDrift
 

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I asked the same question in a post down the board a little "10.5 Full FLoater?", because I was also concerned that the fill plug appears to be slightly below the bottom of the axle tubes, and especially since GM apparently slightly underfills these units. I am gonna do what you and others have suggested: First, make sure the vent tube and hose is free and not kinked, and then just jack up the right side a little to make sure its full. Dont know what axle you've got on your 95. The Dmax/8.1 trucks with the 11.5 14 bolt and the fill plug on the rear cover dont seem to be as bad as the 10.5 14 bolt with the plug on the side.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Mine's the 10.5 corporate rear end. Now that I think of it, I might look up the procedure the Chilton calls for tonight or over the weekend to see just what it says about it.

Thanks for the response.

SnowDrift
 

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AFAIK, a couple of figure-8s after a lube change will oil the axles. the ring gear throws lube up to the top of the case continuously and all the lube the axles needs gets into the tubes by splash and slosh when turning and driving. Has this suddenly become a design problem? News to me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
No. Not at all. I was just asking what the recommended way to handle this is. When the axle is removed for a brake job or something else that requires removal of the drum the oil at the end of the axle drains out, thus the bearings are dry for a short period. I was just wondering what the best way was to assure oil was on the bearings before driving down the road. I didn't know if there was a better way than just jacking one side way up or not.
 

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Sorry, snowdrift, I missed that - you're absolutely correct on a reassembly. Personally, I'd just shoot the new bearing with some gear lube when I put it in and then either tip the axle or do the figure-8s. Rear gear lube has pretty hefty film strength at 75W90 or 90W140, so I don't see a dry bearing as a real risk and it'll get lubed by the system before you run any distance or speed.
 
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