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Discussion Starter #1
Was looking through the threads and didn't see any info on my question.

I'm looking at the C4500 as my next vehicle and was trying to figure out what the average MPG are without a load.

thanks in advance.
 

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My truck has 4:86 gears and running at highway speeds I have managed as high as 14 but normally around 12. Change that to mostly city driving and it quickly becomes 9-10 at best.
 

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8.1 liter MPG=-:t 10MPG/HWY at best. When I bought I didn't know much about Diesel's and the 3500HD Cheyenne that we had before it had the 7.4 and it was a horse, this motor burns oil and it sucks. I cannot wait until I get a Diesel 5500 Crew Cab.
 

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11.5to14 with 4.78 gears at 65 mph,the lower mileage was running into a strong head wind.animal4500 rvtransporter
 

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5:13 rearend and 60mph gets me an average of 12mpg. 90% hwy. Half the time solo, the other half with about 10k lbs trailer.
 

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I'm getting 11 unloaded and 6 towing a 16k horse trailer. That's all highway driving around 65-70. I'm not very happy with mine at all.
 

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Depends alot on terrain, flatlands of Texas with good fuel, about 13-14 MPG with 5.13 gears keeping it at 60 MPH. Mountains drop me to 10 MPG. Mine is a 4X4 too.

Towing, I get 9-10 MPG average, again it depends on terrain and if I am heading into a strong wind. Fuel tank is only 34 gallons, so I added a 120 gallon auxillary. Now if I could only afford to fill it up!
 

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6.6l before I loaded the bed was getting 14 - 16 but now I get 9 - 11 running at 14500 over the scales
 

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Mine is diesel and I instantly got 1 mpg more when I added the Edge and running it all the time on level 1.
 

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I think all who have posted, are running diesel motors.
 

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The RF is 2003 DMax (LRM/LB7) Diesel, 6-sp ZF, 4x2, 4.44:1 Locking 13.5K lbs. rear differential. Worst 9 Mpg. (26,036 lbs on scales) towing double in western mountains, best 14.5 bobtail.

To operate at maximum economy, spec. your drivetrain to remain below 2,300 rpms at highway speeds (whenever possible). The weight and shape of the load carried will more dramatically affect fuel economy than weight or shape of a load being towed. It is also wise to consider the terrain on which you do most of your driving (mountains vs. flatlands or all h/w vs. off road).

Certain drivetrain combinations are best suited for specific applications. These may not do well when used in other applications, so you must consider which aspects you have to compromise in order to find what components and accessories works best for you. If most of your travel is done bobtail, especially in northern climates, a light rear axle weight will not give you the best performance in snow or heavy rain, on the other hand, a truck spec'd as a tractor for towing trailers will work best without a bed or a very light one, because tongue weight of the trailer adds the traction weight on the drives.

RF
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks wasn't sure for a minute there one post listed the 8.1l and I was under the impression that that was a gas engine, as that is what I have in my 2500 Avalanche.
What I'm trying to do is decide between a 3500 or a C4500 Kodiak as my next vehicle for around town driving and pulling of my toy hauler on the weekends.
Unfortunatley I have been having some ill effects with towing on my 2500 even though I'm well below the wieght limit, I'm melting the grease out of my rear axle.
 

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animal,

While I understand your woes with these trucks from reading your threads, many of us have not had any of the issues that you've had. There are "lemmons" with every make, model, platforms that are mass-produced, but it is not fair to paint everyone's trucks with the same brush. I personally do not own/operate a 4500. The reasoning for going up to the 2 ton instead was based on the weight we haul around as well as having access to the Medium Duty Commercial dealers for service and support instead of the network of car dealers that are seeing diesel trucks for the very first time. We also cannot afford to tamper with the works by adding gadgets and gimmicks for juvenile smoke offs and tire spins, so stresses are kept within limits to prevent premature failures or compromises to the warranties.

You are entitled to your opinion, of cours, and this is mine. I only post this to present a balance of opinions to readers that are not aware of your past predicaments and experiences with your "lemmon" truck. No harm done.

ghostwheel,

With single rear wheel trucks, you can be within gross vehicle and gross combined weights, but exceed the rear axle's weight limit. Burned grease and bearings is a good indication that you are experiencing this with the toyhauler in tow. TH trailers have variable weights (loaded/unloaded) and balances (nose/pin weights). Too little weight and the drives can be "wavy" in crosswinds or lack traction on wet/sandy/grassy surfaces. Too heavy and the weight can exceed the drive axle's/suspenssion/rims/tire capacities, especially when braking (weight shifts forward).


RF
 

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I was following this thread and was wondering if anyone knew for sure about the differences between the axles (in general, not just the rear) of the 2500HD, 3500HD, and 4500. I've had my D/A 2500HD for a year and a half now and will be towing about 7500 pounds once or twice a week. I was considering switching from the stock 16" wheels to a 20" wheel with higher load capacity, but was afraid of adding too much extra wheel weight in addition to towing the trailer. Should I not worry about the 2500HD axles or should there be a reason to envy the axles on the standard 3500 or 4500 as being much more desirable,... if anything for the purpose of using heavier wheels/tires (steel wheels, heavy tires, etc.)? I don't mean to hijack this thread at all (forgive me), but posted here because you 4500 owners seem to have a lot of real-world towing experience and probably at one time owned a 2500 or 3500 before. Any comment (or private email message to me) would be greatly appreciated.
 

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we went to texas and drove two brand new k4500 trucks home to montana. both got around 10-12 on the interstate the whole way home. both were dry weight. one had about 700 miles on it. the other had about 3000k miles on her. 6.6l duramax w/automatic ally. i dont remember what the dry weight was but fully loaded with 4 people, gear and water we were at 19,700. usually get 8-10 when were loaded. hope this helps!
 

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I don't have any viable info to back up this statement because I'm not a GM dealer.

My local dealer told me that all the 06' 4500's and within two weeks that all of the 07' 4500's will be spoken for.

The reason for this is the apparent EPA standards on diesel pollution.

There was a post here that had a write up in the Chicago Tribune for this scenario. From the info that I got from the dealer, this write up is highly credible.

Any vehicle built before the Jan 1st 07', will be excluded from the scruntiny, even if the model year is the same.

He also told me that the base price of the light to medium duty trucks will increase a possible $4,000 to cover this "re-tooling" to make these trucks.

His opinion was that if you had a late model 06' with low miles, it would probably bring more than what you paid for it originally because of the new standards. Just his OPINION.

Thanks for listening!
 

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I work with people who use the 2500 to deliver travel trailers and 5th wheel trailers,all kinds and sizes.The only ***** they have is injectors.animal 4500rvtransporter
 
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