Diesel Place banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've looked but can't can find a simple enough explanation for me. My 2007 2500hd 4x4 crewcab duramax has E rated tires and airbags. Will it handle a 5th wheel with a pin weight of 2500-2600 lbs assuming 350-400 lbs of people and stuff are in the cab. The rear weight of the truck is 2900 with me in it. :iamlost:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,363 Posts
Max05 pretty much said it. Your tires are sufficient, and with the air bags you'll be able to level the truck when the trailer is hooked up. However airbags and tires don't change the truck's weight rating, and with that load, you will be exceeding it. I see 2500's pulling these weights all the time, so the question of can they do it is moot. Should they is another story. Being overloaded affects pulling, which the truck is capable of doing, but it also affects handling and stopping, neither of which can be compensated for without making some major changes. It's up to you whether you wish to take those risks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,587 Posts
I pull commercially with the truck in my sig, as long as you have air bags and good brakes on both truck and trailer you will have no problems legal or otherwise. I also don't tow big trailers faster than 65mph, it is just safer.

As a side note I have 516k miles on my truck now with the original drive line with no engine oil smoke or leaks. Our trucks will handle the load fine with good maintenance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
2500 lbs of pin weight is a worse case. Seems that the rear axle rating is just north of 6,000. the weight of the rear truck is 2900 with me (at 200) and roughly a full tank of gas. I would add another 200 to this. Based on the axle rating, I have about 2,900 lbs to play with.
The camper I'm looking at is advertised to have a pin weight of 1765 and weighs 10,000 (on paper) Everybody sez I need to figure 25% of the weight for the pin.
 

·
Diesel Ninja
Joined
·
10,143 Posts
Tires are your limiting factor. The rear axle in a 2500 is the same as a 3500 on the Dmax trucks. If you are running a 265/75R16 then the tire should be rated to carry 3415# if you are running a 245/75R16 then they are rated for 3042# each. This will give you a rear axle capacity of 6830# or 6084#. So depending on tire you have 3930# or 3184# to play with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I have 265/75R16 and are marked at 3415 load capacity. As best I can determine, the rear axles are rated at 6084 lbs. Wouldn't my absolute maximum weight I can put in the bed be limited to 6084 also?
The camper guy is telling me with an advertised pin weight of 1765, the most I'd have on the pin is 2100 even if I put 1500 of stuff in the camper. It sounds logical if 25% of that 1500 was carried by the pin.
 

·
Diesel Ninja
Joined
·
10,143 Posts
I have 265/75R16 and are marked at 3415 load capacity. As best I can determine, the rear axles are rated at 6084 lbs. Wouldn't my absolute maximum weight I can put in the bed be limited to 6084 also?
The camper guy is telling me with an advertised pin weight of 1765, the most I'd have on the pin is 2100 even if I put 1500 of stuff in the camper. It sounds logical if 25% of that 1500 was carried by the pin.
I am assuming that this is a Dmax with an AMM 11.5 axle that they came standard with, in which case the axle is rated for something stupid like 10k. Are you coming up with that 6084# number from the door sticker? If so I bet it also says 245/75R16 for the tires, in which case that number comes from the tire rating. Since you are running the larger tires you can bump it up to the capacity of the tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
The 6084 axle rating is what I found on the internet. The axles are standard that came on the truck. If I'm hearing you correctly, the 265 tires at 3415 (times 2) is the hard number I don't want to exceed.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,363 Posts
2500 lbs of pin weight is a worse case. Seems that the rear axle rating is just north of 6,000. the weight of the rear truck is 2900 with me (at 200) and roughly a full tank of gas. I would add another 200 to this. Based on the axle rating, I have about 2,900 lbs to play with.
The camper I'm looking at is advertised to have a pin weight of 1765 and weighs 10,000 (on paper) Everybody sez I need to figure 25% of the weight for the pin.
The 25% figure is an old guesstimate based on trailers 30 years ago, and I suspect with 5th wheels today, 20% is probably more accurate. Of course everything also depends on your loading. That's why every 5th wheel has their water tank in the rear, to actually lighten the pin when the tank is full.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
651 Posts
.......... That's why every 5th wheel has their water tank in the rear, to actually lighten the pin when the tank is full.
Well, maybe not every one......
 

·
Diesel Ninja
Joined
·
10,143 Posts
The 6084 axle rating is what I found on the internet. The axles are standard that came on the truck. If I'm hearing you correctly, the 265 tires at 3415 (times 2) is the hard number I don't want to exceed.
Yes, that is your hard number IMO. The gassers come with different axles on the 2500 vs 3500 and 3500 Dually. But the dmaxes all share the same axle and the numbers I have heard for it's rating are in the 10k range so we will never overload the axle in our trucks. Springs and tires are the difference between a 3500 and and 2500. If you look at the door sticker inside the drivers side door or rear drivers side door you will find the weight rating of the rear end as it was delivered as well as the tire size. There has been some debate on wheels and as I understand it the trucks delivered with the 265 tires did not come with with the PYO aluminum wheels and while nobody has ever been able to confirm the actual weight limits of the factory aluminum wheels there has been discussion to the effect that they are not rated high enough for the 265 tires, but I have never heard of a failure either. So in a nutshell and my opinion (worth every penny you paid for it) is with air bags your safe limit is the weight rating of the tire. And yes I would consider that a HARD limit as overloading a tire causes more sidewall flex and more heat which equals failure (same with an under pressure tire). To get the idea of that, bend a coat hanger back and forth until it breaks and then feel how hot it is. The same goes with tires, if they are overloaded they overheat and boom.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
My plan is to hook the camper up and weigh it unloaded before I buy it. At least I'd have some idea of what I'm dealing with. My goal is to see the maximum pin weight I need to consider before walking away from the deal and considering something on the lighter side.
If its like I'm being told, the unloaded pin weight should be around 1800 lbs. Just guesstmating 500-600 lbs of people, hitch, dogs, fuel and junk, that would put me at 2300 -2400 lbs. making me a little over the door sticker rating of 9200 lbs. The weight police on a camping site went ballistic and said I needed to trade for a 3500 and preferably a dually. I thought, "screw this. I may as well go with a motor home."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,961 Posts
To weigh it before purchase is a good idea.

Rather than the GVWR on the door sticker (9200#), I would be more mindful of the axle rating (about 6100#). Unless you have upgraded the tires and the rims, which I believe are the limiting factors on the axle rating.

After weighing it empty, consider if it is designed so that you can load it to be close to your limits. Consider, how much stuff will go in the basement, how many clothes in the front closet, where the pantry supplies will go, where the water tank is... fore or aft, and if it has a garage to load heavy or light.

Then balance all that with the condition of the roads, condition of the vehicle/combination, against your experience in these matters.

In the end, have an enjoyable safe trip.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,363 Posts
Well, maybe not every one......
Everyone I've seen, even if the fill was on the front. In fact, now that I think about, all the regular trailers I've seen were the same way, water tank on the rear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,587 Posts
Remember all the pin weight doesn't end up on the rear axle, with a fifth wheel some is distributed toward on the front axle. With good 265 tires youshoul be able to tow just about any fifth wheel that is not overloaded.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,363 Posts
Remember all the pin weight doesn't end up on the rear axle, with a fifth wheel some is distributed toward on the front axle. With good 265 tires youshoul be able to tow just about any fifth wheel that is not overloaded.
Most, but by far not all. Several luxury models, such as the Elite Series by DRV have pin weights close to 4,000 unloaded.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
what I'm gleaning from this and other things Ive read is with 265 tires (mounted on the original aluminum rims) is that the weak link in the chain may be the rims themselves. If that is the case, it would seem at worse, my pin weight limit would be limited to the rating of 245 tires since the aluminum rims would be designed to carry at least amount of weight of the tire rating.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,363 Posts
The rims should have their weigh capacity written or stamped on them somewhere, probably on the inner portion of the wheel.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top