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Discussion Starter #1
Im going to show you guys how to make your own turbo drain back hose and all the fittings and links to parts you will need. First thing to address is the plate at the bottom of the block where the oil drain tube goes in. You need to cut the steel line off flush with the plate and then drill it out to accept a -10an steel weld in bung, which can be found here for $7.85. 10 An Steel Weld in Male Bung Fitting Fuel Breather Tank | eBay
Place the bung in the hole and weld up, be sure and use something to protect the threads from weld splatters, I use an old an fitting to screw over the top.
Next we need to address the oil drain plate on the bottom of the turbo which is as simple as ordering a $11.00 part here. T3/T4 Turbo Oil Drain Flange, -10AN
Now we need to get our hoses and fittings. Stainless hose 3ft. $19.97.
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/sum-230003/overview/
-10an straight hose end $7.49. 10 An Straight Swivel Hose End Fitting Braid Pre 11000 | eBay
-10an 90 deg. hose end $14.87. Pre 11090 10 An 90 Degree Swivel Hose End Fitting for Braided Hose Red Blue | eBay
Now measure, cut and assemble your hose ends, you can read how to do that here. http://www.dieselplace.com/forum/63-gm-diesel-engines/21-6-5l-diesel-engine/732514-how-make-your-own-stainless-braided-hoses-w-o-any-special-tools.html
When you get your hose made up, go ahead and screw it on the an drain plate that goes on the turbo, then attach the plate and gasket too the turbo with the two allen headed bolts supplied. Re-gasket and attatch your drain plate on the block and attach hose. There you go, a leak free turbo drain back setup for about $62.00.:thumb:
 

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My 6.5 scared a prius
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Nice job man! :thumb:
 

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My 6.5 scared a prius
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Don't let his head get too big now Freddy haha :hehe::hehe:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
That's two for the DIY page today, dieselmike1. Got anymore :HiHi:
That's it, thought I would kill 2 birds with one stone.:hehe:
 

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very nicely done :)
 

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Im going to show you guys how to make your own turbo drain back hose and all the fittings and links to parts you will need. First thing to address is the plate at the bottom of the block where the oil drain tube goes in. You need to cut the steel line off flush with the plate and then drill it out to accept a -10an steel weld in bung, which can be found here for $7.85. 10 An Steel Weld in Male Bung Fitting Fuel Breather Tank | eBay
Place the bung in the hole and weld up, be sure and use something to protect the threads from weld splatters, I use an old an fitting to screw over the top.
Next we need to address the oil drain plate on the bottom of the turbo which is as simple as ordering a $11.00 part here. T3/T4 Turbo Oil Drain Flange, -10AN
Now we need to get our hoses and fittings. Stainless hose 3ft. $19.97.
Summit Racing® Stainless Steel Hose SUM-230003 - Free Shipping on Orders Over $99 at Summit Racing
-10an straight hose end $7.49. 10 An Straight Swivel Hose End Fitting Braid Pre 11000 | eBay
-10an 90 deg. hose end $14.87. Pre 11090 10 An 90 Degree Swivel Hose End Fitting for Braided Hose Red Blue | eBay
Now measure, cut and assemble your hose ends, you can read how to do that here. http://www.dieselplace.com/forum/63-gm-diesel-engines/21-6-5l-diesel-engine/732514-how-make-your-own-stainless-braided-hoses-w-o-any-special-tools.html
When you get your hose made up, go ahead and screw it on the an drain plate that goes on the turbo, then attach the plate and gasket too the turbo with the two allen headed bolts supplied. Re-gasket and attatch your drain plate on the block and attach hose. There you go, a leak free turbo drain back setup for about $62.00.:thumb:
I like it, except I want the connection away from the turbo flange. Is there a way to extend down blow or out with a 45 or something to get it out where you can easily get to it with wrenches?

Or is the way dieselmike1 has it not as tight as it looks? I want to be able to easily remove the line. I have fat hands and want to be able to eliminate asking my wife to get in and do anything. I get it done eventually but it looks like I would have a heck of a time starting the stainless hose onto the fitting.

I do not like that the fitting I have on hand is 1/2" NPT female - it would leak around the outside of the threads if I do not get it sealed good. What would be the best thread sealer to use in such close proximity to the turbo if I use my fittings for a starter and drop down with a nipple?

When welding near thread i use an ample supply of anti-spatter along with something to cover the threads.

The problem I had with the 10 AN straight fitting off the turbo was that the hose end crashed on the turbo flange on the 96 Suburban, I would have had to grind the flange for it to fit. I do not want to go to that trouble.

I have these fitting on hand - or should I just scrap them and go with something different T3 T4 1 2" NPT CNC Billet Turbo Drain Flange turbocharger Kit | eBay
 

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Just info for those considering this mod. The return line ID size is critical for proper turbo performance. Bigger drain is better. 10AN fittings and line sometime hover in the 1/2" ID size. A 90 degree fitting in any drain is a big No-No. So give it some thought.

The turbo whips the returning oil into a foam which is slow to return to the pan. 90 degree fittings compound the problem. Once the oil level in the turbo cartridge reaches the level of the turbine shaft problems start to occur. Oil tends to leak past the "seals" in the turbo. Back pressure in the crankcase also tends to slow the return of oil.

The drain looks great and I am not condemning the workmanship one bit. Just letting ya'll know how it's supposed to work. The oil drains by gravity so don't slow it up.

The turbo oil drain flange spec. given on the site shows the ID as 0.417" which is quite small for a drain.
 

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Just info for those considering this mod. The return line ID size is critical for proper turbo performance. Bigger drain is better. 10AN fittings and line sometime hover in the 1/2" ID size. A 90 degree fitting in any drain is a big No-No. So give it some thought.

The turbo whips the returning oil into a foam which is slow to return to the pan. 90 degree fittings compound the problem. Once the oil level in the turbo cartridge reaches the level of the turbine shaft problems start to occur. Oil tends to leak past the "seals" in the turbo. Back pressure in the crankcase also tends to slow the return of oil.

The drain looks great and I am not condemning the workmanship one bit. Just letting ya'll know how it's supposed to work. The oil drains by gravity so don't slow it up.

The turbo oil drain flange spec. given on the site shows the ID as 0.417" which is quite small for a drain.
Do you have any thoughts on starting out with this fitting , getting past the turbo flange and ending up with a leak proof return?

T3 T4 1 2" NPT CNC Billet Turbo Drain Flange turbocharger Kit | eBay
 

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Do you have any thoughts on starting out with this fitting , getting past the turbo flange and ending up with a leak proof return?
Last one I made on a different application used thin wall tubing welded to the flange on both ends. Then somewhere in the middle where I could get to it the tubing was divided. The two pieces of tubing where then joined with some high temp oil resistant hose with just plain hose clamps joining the two.

Article about drains and such > Garrett & Holset Turbo Users - Your Oil Drain May Be Too Small! | DSMtuners
 

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Why cut off the pipe from the plate? Why not get an weld on fittings welded to the pipe? Seems like an extra step that's not needed...
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Why cut off the pipe from the plate? Why not get an weld on fittings welded to the pipe? Seems like an extra step that's not needed...
It would decrease the diameter fitting that could be used, and quite frankly it only takes a couple minutes to cut the pipe and enlarge the hole. I dont like to cobble things up anyway. If your gonna do a job ,do it right the first time, i say. :coffee:
 
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