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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Right now my house has what is left of a deck that is more or less on the ground. Lots of issues with this so it has to go. It leads from the driveway to the main entrance of the house. If we say the driveway elevation is 0 the door is maybe 16". Right now the deck is about 10".

I was originally going to do concrete basically at driveway level and steps to the door but I do sort of like the height of the deck because its a clean edge to the grass and on lighter snows you can just push it off the edge. Found out it really doesn't cost much more to build it up to the level of the deck so basically I would be replacing the wood deck with concrete. Was going to have it tinted and maybe do a simple stamp to make it not look like a parking lot. Quotes came in between $3500 and $12k for that.

There are a few things that concern me about the concrete other than the cost and that it could crack and look like crap in a fairly short amount of time. There is one downspout that currently just dumps under the deck that would have to go below the concrete. It can't be above because you end up with ice on the main walkway all winter long. Grade slopes down so it would not be a big deal to bury it but that is also right where all the utilities come in so got to be careful how deep I go not to mention if anything ever went wrong with a utility it may be a lot more expensive to fix it.

The idea of pavers then came up. Pavers seem less permanent and could be a lot more DIY (cheaper) than concrete. I have a skid steer and could rent a compactor. Anyone have a paver patio or sidewalk in a snow climate? How are they to shovel?
 

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Depending on the edges of the pavers and how well laid their are, they can be easy to shovel or they can be an absolute pain. Small ones, with round edges, properly locked in place, very nice to shovel. Larger ones (like 18" + inches a side) are harder to get really even and they tend to get uneven afterwards easier.


And you want to prevent water from draining on them, as it can wash the sand away from underneath the stones, allowing them to sink. Then they REALLY suck to shovel.
 
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