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Ok, I am embarrassed to admit this, but it is true. This is my first filter change. Well at least I didn't get run over making the change. Although I've done worse in my life. Perhaps I held off thinking about what a pain it was to do the two filters on my 6.2 diesel. I have to say, the Duramax layout made it easy to accomplish a fuel filter change. I'll be doing it more often in the future.


These shots show my filter at 37,613 miles. The picture quality is not as good as most, but it will give you an idea of its condition. I doubt anyone else will be dumb enough to leave one on this long. So for historical purposes it should be recorded here. And you will know what you can get away with.


Some details. I used a vise grip to get the water sensor off, and put it back on with hand pressure alone. I used a small padlock key to loosen the bleed screw and tightened that hand tight only.


It took exactly 80 pumps to prime the filter with the bleed screw fairly loose. I tightened it some, pumped a few more times, tightened it more, pumped again, and then zinged it as tight as I could by hand. I was unable to pump any more and the motor started and ran without a hiccup. I used the oil filter wrench to tighten the filter--very slightly so as not to deform the can. No leaks.


Notes:


1. I cut the can up with a hacksaw, so some of the debris is from that. I used a vise to hold the can, which accounts for the deformation at the bottom where the water sensor screws on.


2. I did not have to bend any air conditioning lines to get this filter off. There was plenty of room. I have a 2001 K3500 LT. It took me longer to cut the can apart, longer to find the tools, and also longer to take the picture and write this, than it did to change the filter. I'd estimate that with the right tools, oil filter wrench, and vise grips, the whole job can be done in 5 minutes, or 10 if you are loafing.


3. No signs of water in the system. I found this surprising. But I'm not complaining!





You can see some larger bits of detritus in the bottom, this is not from the hacksaw. The can did not show any signs of rust. That junk may have come in when I changed fuel tanks at ~30,000 miles. It looked like scale rust--perhaps this came form loose material inside the new tank. Since they can't weld a nice seam everywhere inside the tank, I know there must be some rough edges on the inside.





It was a pretty dirty filter, but not quite used up. The above picture shows that some of the filter material was still somewhat clean along the top edge.


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I changed my first fuel filter at 7500 miles and it didn't look much better than yours. I guess I'll stop wasting time and money and stick to recommended service intervals and oem filters and fluids. I won't have this thing past 100k anyhow.
 

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Wow! That's in pretty good shape for 37K + miles. Better shape then some of the 15K mile filters. Where do you buy you fuel from?
 

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Don't follow the intervals of changing the fuel filter from the manual which I believe is every 15000 miles. I put about 25000 miles a year on my truck and I change it four times a year. At a Cost of 36.00 a filter from Purolator, the filter is easier to change than the injectors. Remember that Real Trucks don't have spark plugs, Drive ON!
 

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Dustin


If you are changing them that often you can find them quite a bit cheaper. I know Eric had them a while back for about 1/2 that.


Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I just paid $40 at the Chevy dealer for the one I put in today. I wish I waited.


I just ordered two of these shown below for $18 each.


Here is the link.


http://www.gmdieseltech.com/shop/


 
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