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Discussion Starter #1
A lot of tire centers are offering this service. Anyone done it? Worth it? What did it do for you?
 

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Never tried it, but from what I've heard, it is supposed to keep the pressure in the tires more constant as there is less moisture in nitrogen than regular air. Less moisture = less pressure change due to changes in temperature. For all that, regular air works fine for me. ):h
 

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I got an opinion on this - not worth doing. Look, we've been running tires on "Air" for ever. Now with that said I believe is something is good then do it but in all reality we are not racing cars here and air will do just fine. Suit yourself but for me (deep breath) old fashioned air works just fine and my compressor at home makes plenty of that.

But remember what they say about opinions........
 

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Why use Nitrogen?

Less inflation pressure loss
Reduced wheel corrosion
Prevents inner-liner rubber deterioration by oxidation
Tires run cooler
Increases tread life
Increases fuel mileage
Helps prevent uneven wear

Oxygen in compressed air permeates through the wall of the tire, thus reducing the tire's inflation pressure. During it's journey through the tire wall, oxygen oxidizes the rubber compounds in the tire, causing under-inflation and deterioration of the rubber . Dry nitrogen will maintain proper inflation pressure and will prevent auto-ignition, will not corrode rims, extends valve core life, and will help the tire to run cooler. Experts in the tire industry indicate that oxidative aging is one of the primary causes of decreased tire life. Oxidative aging is caused by the diffusion of oxygen from the pressurized air cavity of the tire to the outside atmosphere. Tests have shown that if tires are inflated with nitrogen, there is a significant reduction in tire failure. While both nitrogen and oxygen can permeate rubber, nitrogen does it much more slowly. It might take 6 months to lose 2 psi with nitrogen, compared to just a month with air. And nitrogen is far less reactive. It doesn't cause rust or corrosion on steel or aluminum, and it doesn't degrade rubber. Wheel surfaces stay smooth and clean, rubber remains supple and resilient.
 

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If you're gonna do this make sure you use round nitrogen. ):h
 

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I use helium because I get better gas mileage with it. :p:

A couple guys at work have it in theirs (you can tell by the ugly green valve stem caps) and they haven't seen any improvements in mileage or anything. Tracook listed some benefits that we wouldn't be able to see, but I still don't think I would pay more for it if I had to. Air has been pretty good to me.

I now use C02 for offroading/beach driving, and wow is that stuff unstable. When it got cold out I was about 15 psi lower than my normal with that stuff in. So, C02 is good to use in a pinch, but just check your psi alot when you are running it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Why use Nitrogen?

Less inflation pressure loss
Reduced wheel corrosion
Prevents inner-liner rubber deterioration by oxidation
Tires run cooler
Increases tread life
Increases fuel mileage
Helps prevent uneven wear

Oxygen in compressed air permeates through the wall of the tire, thus reducing the tire's inflation pressure. During it's journey through the tire wall, oxygen oxidizes the rubber compounds in the tire, causing under-inflation and deterioration of the rubber . Dry nitrogen will maintain proper inflation pressure and will prevent auto-ignition, will not corrode rims, extends valve core life, and will help the tire to run cooler. Experts in the tire industry indicate that oxidative aging is one of the primary causes of decreased tire life. Oxidative aging is caused by the diffusion of oxygen from the pressurized air cavity of the tire to the outside atmosphere. Tests have shown that if tires are inflated with nitrogen, there is a significant reduction in tire failure. While both nitrogen and oxygen can permeate rubber, nitrogen does it much more slowly. It might take 6 months to lose 2 psi with nitrogen, compared to just a month with air. And nitrogen is far less reactive. It doesn't cause rust or corrosion on steel or aluminum, and it doesn't degrade rubber. Wheel surfaces stay smooth and clean, rubber remains supple and resilient.
Let me guess, you're a Nitrogen salesman? :lol:

Nice reply. Thanks.
 

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I now use C02 for offroading/beach driving, and wow is that stuff unstable. When it got cold out I was about 15 psi lower than my normal with that stuff in. So, C02 is good to use in a pinch, but just check your psi alot when you are running it.
Just wondering - if it's so unstable, then why do you run it normally offroading and beach driving?
 

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I agree that a tire filled with nitrogen will hold a more constant pressure with changes in temp. than a tire filled with air. This is why airplane tires are usually filled with nitrogen. The nitrogen is also less reactive than regular air. I also agree that the tires and wheels will degrade less from the inside since there is less oxidation. I also agree that moisture in the air causes problems. What I don't agree with is the statement that oxygen permeates the tire quicker than nitrogen. An Oxygen molecule is 28.5% larger than a nitrogen molecule and therefore not likely to "squeeze" between the rubber molecules faster than Nitrogen.
Dry Air contains 78% Nitrogen and 21% oxygen. The remaining 1% is made up of other molecules. If there is any humidity in the air water will change these numbers a little.
If a couple of psi change doesn't bother you when your tires heat up, then just run air and just tell people your tires are filled with a nitrogen mix. ;)
If a couple of psi will make a difference eg. some race cars handle completely with a very small change in pressure then run nitrogen. just my $.02
 

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nitrogen is the best for filling up your tires IMO
 

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I run it (C02) because when you air down while offroading and beach driving, there is normally no air pumps close by to fill back up. Otherwise, I'll put air in if I'm at home or around a pump. I looked at onboard air, but it was way too expensive and much slower. With my 20# C02 tank, I can fill up plenty of tires, reseat beads, and run air tools incase something breaks while on the trail. Plus, I built the tank pretty cheap....$50 for tank, $20 for fill up, $10 for handle, $35 for regulator, about $10 for 25' hose. It works awesome, but you just gotta make sure you check your psi more often with temp changes.
 

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I have nitrogen in my tires. Tires run cooler for sure, it seems a little stiffer. But the pressure never changes hot or cold. Its been really nice for sure. I will keep updating as the miles roll on... So far no problems. I do 80 miles to work and back and about 200 miles on the weekends pulling a 26' enclosed snowmobile trailer. I give the tires a workout thats for sure!
 

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Question. Does the tire shop evacuate the air out of the tire after it is mounted, then put nitrogen in? If not, the tire is already filled to 14.7 psi absolute pressure before you add the nitrogen. I would like to see them evacuate the air, because doing so would pull the tire off the bead. So, you still have air in the tire, not 100% nitrogen. If you fill the tire to 60 psi, you have a 20% air 80% nitrogen mix. The way I look at it, air is 78% nitrogen anyway, so you aren't gaining that much. Regarding air loss, I never have to add air to my tires unless they get a hole in them.
 

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sed to work on had nitrogen in the tires suposedly because it does not expand like oxygen.
I don't have a nitrogen tank but I have an air compressor so that is what I use.
If I were to get a tank for filling tires I would get nitrogen as opposed to co2.
And thats my .02
 

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Question. Does the tire shop evacuate the air out of the tire after it is mounted, then put nitrogen in? If not, the tire is already filled to 14.7 psi absolute pressure before you add the nitrogen. I would like to see them evacuate the air, because doing so would pull the tire off the bead. So, you still have air in the tire, not 100% nitrogen. If you fill the tire to 60 psi, you have a 20% air 80% nitrogen mix. The way I look at it, air is 78% nitrogen anyway, so you aren't gaining that much. Regarding air loss, I never have to add air to my tires unless they get a hole in them.


good point:thumb:
 

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Marc,
Air is almost 80% nitrogen anyways so only 20% of the 14.7 psi is going to be air so it would dilute out a lot if nitrogen was then added.

dave
 

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What you are measuring with the Tire Gage is PSI differential between the gas inside the tire and the atmosphere outside the tire. that does not negate your argument that there is some air inside the tire, but it does minimize it.
I know there is going to be some engineer on the board who can actually calculate the ratio of mass of air for a given tire at 60 PSID, but I'm not that guy.
Doesn't cost anything at Costco for Nitrogen and since they offer free rotations, pressure checks, balancing and all that jazz along with better prices seems like a low risk proposition to me.
I'm not going to go out of my way to ensure my tires are refilled with nitrogen, but I don't think it hurts.
 

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According to my cackelations, filling the tire to 60 lbs would net a concentration of 95.6% nitrogen. I base this on the following: You start out at approx 15 psi absolute pressure, then add 60 lbs to have a resulting 75 psia. So, the air takes up 1/5 of the total volume. Since the air is 78% nitrogen 22% other, you divide the 22% by 5 to achieve the total air concentration.

I believe nitrogen is a good thing to fill tires with. I just don't believe it is worth paying extra for. If Costco or anyone else gives it for free, I'd gladly take it.
 

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I prefer a mix of nitrogen, oxygen and trace gases. a 78/20/2

It seems to get good mileage.
 
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