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This is my first Diesel and I am wondering if there is a certian way to deal with cold weather starting and stoping the engine.


I understand the Block heater issue but what I am asking is , Do I need to let this D/A idle before taking off in the morning. I drive less than a mile to the expressway and drive about 15 miles to work. I also set in my truck at lunch and listen to the radio. Now with it getting colder I will be letting the engine run for 20-25 min for heat.


These might sound like dumb questions but I want this truck to last a long time ( at least long enough to pay it off ). Any input from you guys will help.


Thanks


Paul
 

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I just let mine run a minute or so but it spends the nite in a heated garage.


At work I can plug in but it's a long walk to the building so I do the same 1 minute run.


I also drive easy for the first 3-5 minutes (35-40mph).


If u are working the truck it's good to let it idle for a few minutes so the temps and turbo cool down some before shut down.
 

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I let mine idle (or at least try not to get above idle speed) until the amp meter shows the glow plugs have shut down (meaning the needle goes to its normal position). After that I take it easy for the .1-.2 miles it takes me to get to the main road. Once on the highway I keep up with the traffic but try not to push her until the engine temp. comes up to normal. Seem to recall somewhere that extended idling isn't good for the Allison but can't recall the source. Suspect idling in winter temperatures wouldn't have the same degree of impact as doing so in hot weather ... Jim
 

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JEBar


I am interested in the "bad for Allison to idle" source. I have a hard time squaring that up with high idle switches and PTO's offered for these transmissions on the C/K3500.


Maybe if the transmission was installed pre-OEM engine it would work better.
 

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As stated, can't recall source and can't say for sure that it is accurate. Do know my handbook says to idle engine if transmission over heats and doesn't list idling engine among the things that may cause transmission to over heat. I do know that when I am running my Warn winch for extended periods, both transmission and engine temps go way up. Guess that would make sense since. Hope some others will be able to chip in and provide you with more info ... Jim
 

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JEBar said:
when I am running my Warn winch for extended periods, both transmission and engine temps go way up




You may want to check the ground wiring on your winch.
 

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NVRENUF said:
You may want to check the ground wiring on your winch.

Will do ... thanks for the tip ... Jim
 

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Will not hurt Allison trans to idle. Fleet of 100+ Fire Trucks in Houston all have Allison autos(I know they are not the same model) that idle for extended periods w/ no ill effects.
 

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The "bad for Allison to idle" source is from the Allison Manual that states it is not good to leave the Allison in gear at idle for more than 5 minutes. It states for extended idle times, you should be in Park.


I just found it in the Allison Manual on page 37:
"CAUTION: Always select P (Park), PB (Auto-Apply Parking Brake), or N (Neutral) whenever time at idle exceeds five minutes. Extended idling in any other ranges may cause transmission overheating and damage."


Bob
 

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I have a 14-mile run to work. I start it and just wait about 30 seconds after the oil pressure builds up and then go. Diesels do not warm up when idling and the do not like to operate under no-load conditions. They want (love) a little to a lot of load. I accelerate easy in the beginning. It's side roads for 8 miles so I don't go over 45 miles an hour. Then it’s the high way at 50 to 65 miles an hour for the rest of the trip. It’ probably unnecessary pampering but it’s a relaxing ride.

I have read several industry and GM articles and journals that state it is not good to idle diesels for long time with no load. The usual reference is not more than 5 minutes. The fuel is richer during idle and there is more fuel wash between the cylinders and the cylinder walls. This leads to less lubrication between the cylinders and cylinder walls and more contaminants in the oil. Particularly increased soot levels.

I operate large stationary diesel-AC generator sets (Called Prime Movers). Their start-to-load sequence is all automatic: Start, idle one minute, assume load. And by assume load it’s full load. And they are in no way harmed by it. (BTW these diesels are bigger than our entire trucks.)

As far as cool down. After you get off the high way if you ride side streets and coast through a moderate sized parking lot. You should be cooled down enough to just shut down. Cool down was more critical in earlier generation turbo’s. It’s not that critical now. But it’s always better to pamper it a little. (The Prime Movers have an automatic two-minute cool down after load is removed, then they shut down.) If it’s good enough for industry diesels it’s probably good enough for motor vehicle diesels.
 

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4x4 Man - thanks for the info from the Allison manual. I downloaded that thing two months ago and have never looked at it. I will now make it my weekend reading.


JohnnyO - thanks for the practical application. Every turbine powered aircraft, as well as tubro piston planes generally had a two minute cooldown.


FILO - I lived in Conroe for six years; my wife worked with an HFD wife named Williamson who lived on lake Conroe. I enjoyed several cold beers with HFD personnel at his house - great folks to a man.


Thanks to all for my continuing education.


ponz
 

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ponz-


Just make sure you get enough lube to those pistons



 

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WOW! what is that off of? One of the Prime Movers you were talking about?


John
 

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CS-Dmax-


This is the 2005 Duramax Diesel
.
Yep. This is what they call a prime mover. Bore = 1' 7", stroke =2'
V 18 with 29,300 HP and they do come smaller and larger. The real big ones are capable of 110,000 HP. They are used to power anything from power plants to marine propulsion.
 

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Now this is a Diesel!!!!



http://www.bath.ac.uk/~ccsshb/12cyl/
 
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