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This is when you need 1/2" fuel lines

https://youtu.be/mt84tawh0_E

To the OP: I can send you 2 stock injectors for troubleshooting if you are in a bind....let me know tonight.
 

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Let me quote this again since you avoided the part I actually quoted. It's not a waste of money to upgrade the pump and retain the 3/8 line. Any opinion that disagrees is just an opinion that is going to mislead 99% of the people on here.
Only thing youve proven is you have no clear understanding of how lift pumps operate or of Fluid Dynamics, and note I never said the 3/8" supply (suction) line was insufficient to meet the demands of a fairly stock 6.5.

'A pump does not create pressure, it only creates flow. The gauge pressure is a measurement of the resistance to flow.'

Whats misleading is referring to the lift pump supply line as a suction line. It doesnt suck, it simply contains the vacuum (low pressure zone) created that atmosphere then equalizes...

But why upgrade with a $200 plus hi performance liftpump just to immediately choke its proficiency (regulate psi) to match the performance of an OEM type $75.00 lift pump that is proving most capable of doing the job most efficiently given a properly serviced and correctly maintained 'fuel supply system' that is free from electrical defects, restrictions, damage, corrosion, and/or air leaks.

And I said upgraded lift pumps are a waste of money if you dont also increase the supply line, just as reccommended by FASS..

Understand that lift pumps blow (create fuel pressure), they do not suck!!! As the lift pump creates fuel pressure, it leaves a low pressure zone in its wake that ONLY atmospheric pressure (14psi) replenish's by pushing fuel from the fuel tank, through the fuel supply (suction) line towards the low pressure zone (void) left in the lp's wake.
Often referred to as lift pump 'draw' its actually ATMOSPHERE (w/ fixed PSI) that pushes fuel towards the lift pumps low pressure zone, so a larger supply (suction) line will obviously FLOW more fuel ensuring that the hi performance lift pump is never starved of fuel possibly causing cavitation, even if its just whipping the fuel into a froth while chokin (restricting via internal regulating) the 'fuel flow' of the constantly running rotary vane and/or gearotor type pumps..





I have a 11sec 383 small block street car as well. And it has 3/4" fuel line with a 280gph pump. But that has nothing to do with my 6.5 Diesel.

Lets just say my last few street rod projects would have required mandatory safety rollcages, roll bars were no longer good 'nough to pass tech inspection. My last street beast with one of Mark Browns friday night special ran 160mph between redlights err mean right NOW, and could run 140mph ALL day long, please dont ask me how I know that. Race ya to the next gas station. :HiHi:

Soo.. I have a demon400 on the bench left over from a past street rod project, given enough jerry riggin and modifications, I could make it work on my 6.5 too.......... But why...

Liken it to bolting $4000 pimped out set of wheels on an otherwise stock $1500.00 mid '80's Chevy Caprice 4dr sedan, what a joke.. I call them pimped out mobile homes.

This is when you need 1/2" fuel lines
https://youtu.be/mt84tawh0_E
Been there, done that too, few dozens times if I count all my family and friends 'projects' Ive participated in too. Performed at least a half dozen of my very own frame off retro-rods that unfortunitely took place long before the advent of youtube, or the internet, or digital camera's, or cellphones now loaded with all those capabilities. All that stuff, even scan tools were fantastic futuristic science fiction crap and all of my photo albums documenting them builds are somewhere in storage. My last purpose built 'hotrod' was totalled in the early '90's by an inattentive teenager who missed a stop sign. 3 years of blood, sweat, and tears distroyed in an instant. Even though I recovered all my $$$, thank goodness for over-ride insurance protection by USAA, but the experience broke my spirit so I havent built another 'Boulevard Bruiser' for myself since. Given it much thought though. And Ive been distracted raisng a family and handling several business's, but now that we are somewhat empty nesters again and I have the wifes full blessing, I am thinking 'bout building another. Cant believe Im actually seriously contemplating a 6.5L Turbo Diesel powerplant this last time, most likely.
Wife still thinks we need 2 more 'rides', a daily comfortable weekend 'cruiser' (diesel powered late '40's early '50's era panel truck) and one nasty ass saturday night bruiser (gasoline powered).

Did I ever tell ya 'bout the time I caught the wife racing a roached mustang to the grocery store? Funny as hell, lets save it for another day..

Anyhow and much like I always do with everything I set my mind to, I research my subject(s) thoroughly before I attempt to alter or change anything much less make upgrades to 'major systems' without first having a clear understanding and establishing a base line to compare said upgrades too.

Got any baseline data, from before making any of the upgrades?

Not saying this was your case, but upgrading the lift pump on a sick fuel system will most always produce positive results. Much like how adding a new PMD will often reestablish normal DS4 pump operation, if only for a day or two years depending on the frequency and severity of the unrecognised on-going undiagnosed fuel supply deficiency that will continue to deminish the new PMD health and greatly shortens its reliable, useful service life expectancy..

PMD a day keeps the goblins away, or so they say.. I think of PMDs now as an infectious immune booster shot for the IP.. For that story, you'll have to wait for the report (soon) now that Im about to conclude months of on-going field testing while monitoring the entire fuel supply system operating pressures, from strainer to return MOST THOROUGHLY, in order to confirm and/or establish my own confirmed baselines of a perfectly healty vehicle so as I make changes and/or upgrades, my 'opinion' isnt influenced by past unpleasantries, skewed, bias's or clouded by all the never ending bullshit surrounding the poorly understood EFI 6.5TDs but lets not digress any further.... You say tomatoes, I say tomatoos. :thumb:
You do what ever helps you get your diesel on.

Enough with the bench racing, I think my fat ass one ton dually will smokeless yours in the 8th mile.. :boxing:

J/K

OP has a '93 that was exhibiting signs of faulty glowplugs, replacing the injectors only made it worse. Its now exhibiting symptoms of fuel starvation too. Someone help 'em..
 

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3/8" is the FASS spec for the DRP-02 and there's not a 6.5 around here that needs more GPH than it offers.
 

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About those popular 'Dodge Replacement Pump' (DRP) -02

NOTE: The DRP is designed as a stock replacement pump. It will not meet the needs of performance applications.
NOTE: The DRP is not compatible with waste vegetable oil (WVO) or BioDiesel fuels.
NOTE: Inline filter will need to be replaced every 6,000 miles.
DRP Series Installation Manual 70GPH @ 18psi.

No mention of 'normal' amperage draw in either the Installation manual or Technical guide..
Fass Technical Guide 
'A restriction can cause increased amperage on the motor, which could cause a wire to get hotter than normal or pop a fuse.'
'All FASS systems will be supplied from the factory with an in line filter or water separator, a clogged filter can cause the mo-tor on the FASS to over amp and blow a fuse.'

Upgrading The Fuel System

MORE GOOD INFO ABOUT LIFT PUMPS
'We like it more than the Fass DDRP as it puts out MORE VOLUME, and doesn’t require or need an inlet filter which has been a nightmare problem with the DDRP Fass unit. The FRRP is not a vane pump, as is the DDRP, and therefore does not share the problems associated with that design.'


Fuel Pump Diagnosis: Amp Testing

All info I find indicates that healthy Dodge OEM liftpump draws (requires) 6-8-10-12 amps normally (nothing concrete) whereas healthy GMs OEM lift pump is around 2.5 amps....
Please test the DRP-02 for amp draw and let us know what it is, suspect its more than 5amps..
GM OPS is only rated for 5amp continuous service so IF you do plan on upgrading the lift pump, might research the amp draw and/or plan on adding an OPS mod on OBD1 models. How this increased amp draw may affect OBD2 models :confuzeld

I report, you decide.. Also have several friends and asociates with Dodges who are constantly bitchin' bout there fuel pump woes. I recall some resorted to adding parrallel lift pumps because they proved just as problematic and unreliable.
AFAIK, 98-02 Dodge lift pump operation is controlled by ECM, excessive amps draw would cause ECM to temp shut it off, killing LP operation resulting in a very simular s'ituation to GM OBD1 OPS failure but lets not muddy up the Place with Dodge talk..


FTR.. I never claimed a mildly modified 6.5 required any more fuel than what a healthy OEM unmolested system provides.

IF you want to 'upgrade' the system with an aftermarket lift pumps seeking more power, go for it. Expecting increased reliability from those popular aftermarket lift pumps vs OEM, now thats very debatable.

If your 'upgrading' for increased performance, then upgrade the system completely and properly, dont piecemeal s'it together.

Frankly, I doubt that even Heaths proclaim to fame 500HP 6.5L land speed record needed any additional (Airdog) help either although I understand his reasoning for wanting to do so......

500hp 6.5L Diesel Race Engine
Fuel Injection System
The limit on power imposed by the 6.5L's comparatively fuel-stingy Stanadyne DS-4 injection pump is a very real one and Heath knew the only hope was to squeeze every last bit of power from what fuel it does provide. The Heath Diesel IDI engine used the off-the-shelf HO Bosch fuel injectors. These were combined with factory high-pressure lines and a new Stanadyne 5521 injection pump. The only modification to the injection pump was the addition of Tim Outland's Feed the Beast fuel inlet fittings. Heath runs an AirDog fuel lift pump adjusted to 7 psi of fuel pressure. The higher engine speed substantially changed the amount of fuel necessary, which began to stretch the limits of the regular heavy-duty lift pump.'

Article goes on to state;

'The maximum fuel rate is identical to the regular production program, which exercises the injection pump to its physical limits. The primary limiting factor in this combination is the DS-4 Stanadyne injection pump.'

Which leaves me with many unanswered questions about these 'performance tunes', but none have any relevance to OPs DB2 woes.. Another day, another thread perhaps. Everytime I try to wrap my head around all the techno-babble PCM tuner stuff.. my head hurts to the point of exploding..
 

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Discussion Starter #65 (Edited)
Well I finally got her straightened out last night.


I installed the correct CTS, verified than the cold advance works, repaired the high idle solenoid (the winding had corroded off of the terminal so I soldered it back on), replaced all of the glow plugs (which required welding nuts to two of them) and then got lucky with one final injector line crack test.


Previously, when I had cracked the injectors, I could not notice a difference in the clacking noise. This time, I don't know if it was the engine temperature or what, but when I cracked #1 open it became much harder to make it make the noise. I could still get it to do it though by revving it up.


Earlier in the day I talked to a friend who works on HMMWV's and he said it sounded like a stuck lifter by my description and that he sees it all the time on HMMWV's that sit. After cracking the injector and listening, I was pretty convinced that it was a lifter. I put some Seafoam in the crank case and took it for an easy drive. In about 2 minutes, the noise was gone but it was smoking quite a bit. Another minute and that cleared up and now it runs very smoothly with no smoke.


I need to do a little more testing on the CTS switch today because I still couldn't get the high idle to kick on. I can get it to work by jumping the battery to it though, and when I ohm'd out the CTS with the engine cold, it was closed so I think I might have a problem with the voltage coming into it. Same story with the cold advance from the best I can tell. I don't have a GP controller in it at the moment because I ordered the wrong one, so maybe that has something to do with it. I just ran out of time to check it out.


I also have an oil leak on both valve covers. I had them off and sealed them with Permatex Ultra Black gasket maker. I used half of a 3.35oz tube on each one and I thought I had plenty on there but I missed a spot apparently. I put it on, sat the VC's on the heads, and let it tack up for about 10 minutes for each one before snugging down the bolts.


Once I get the oil leak straightened out, I think the next thing on the list will be the harmonic damper and crank pulley just for peace of mind.
 

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I also have an oil leak on both valve covers. I had them off and sealed them with Permatex Ultra Black gasket maker. I used half of a 3.35oz tube on each one and I thought I had plenty on there but I missed a spot apparently. I put it on, sat the VC's on the heads, and let it tack up for about 10 minutes for each one before snugging down the bolts.


Once I get the oil leak straightened out, I think the next thing on the list will be the harmonic damper and crank pulley just for peace of mind.
ultra black is great... but it's gotta be put on thin.

you want a 1/8-3/16" bead... too thick and it'll just glop out, and fail.

also, it needs a clean head and cover to seal right. then like you did, assemble, but you need to finger tight all the bolts, so the goop is in compressed form, then let it sit 8 hours I think... it's on the tube, to fully cure, before you final snug down the bolts.
 

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Discussion Starter #67
Roger that, thanks. I've used it the way I described for the "China wall" on a small block Chevy intake and it always worked fine. I'll do it that way for round 2. Sucks that I have to pull the intake and injector lines again.
 

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IMO Permatex "The Right Stuff" is better for this. It's a high torque gasket maker and it's ready for instant service once the VC's are torqued down. No waiting.

Be SURE you clean out any residual sealer from the VC bolt holes before putting the bolts in and DON'T get any sealer down in the bolt holes. Will prevent you from getting them tight and some have cracked their intake ports in the process.
 

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Discussion Starter #69
I'll check that out thanks.

I have a set of cork gaskets on hand. I'm guessing its not even worth trying those?
 

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Roger that, thanks. I've used it the way I described for the "China wall" on a small block Chevy intake and it always worked fine. I'll do it that way for round 2. Sucks that I have to pull the intake and injector lines again.
That area on a SBC has no compression on it, so it's just surface tension holding it there, and your method would work great for that... The tin valve covers on the 6.5 need precise application and even torque to hold.

I'll check that out thanks.

I have a set of cork gaskets on hand. I'm guessing its not even worth trying those?
NO...
 

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Discussion Starter #71
I picked up some Permatex "The Right Stuff" earlier today. Now I just need the rain to let up.
 
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