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Discussion Starter #1
so either im blind or my stock headlights are not up to par. im giving myself $100 allowance to address this problem. i have considered the john deere bulbs but im not sure if that is enough. i have found these http://www.roundeyes.com/Products-Auxiliary_Bulbs.html it says 60% brighter but how can you actually test how much brighter? would they be worth while?

what are some cheap upgrades?

for some reason my '02 gmc never bothered me but in my '03 chev im basically driving by brail.

TIA
 

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your lights are not that brite? mine on low beam gets me brite lighted all the time everbody thinks i have the high beams on and i don't even use the fog lites .that is odd you light are not that brite .
 

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Discussion Starter #4
catch03;1587516; said:
heck your are not that brite mine on low beam gets me brite lighted all the time everbody thinks i have the highbeams on and i don't even use the fog lites maybe it is just time for new bulbs in you truck the bulbs might be getting weak
:eyecrazy: :think: what did you say? :think: :eyecrazy:
 

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read it again had a fart on my brain !!!!!!try some glasses ha! ha! you said either your blind or your lights are not up to par
 

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Find a flat parking lot at night and take a broom handle with you and a piece of tape. With your truck parked level, hold the broom handle vertical in front of the headlamp. Place a piece of tape on the lamp hot spot on the broom handle. Now walk out 15ft or so and see where the hot spot is. It should be slightly lower. Now repeat the other side.

Now, make the necessary corrections. Most of mine were high from the factory and this was exaggerated by the rear suspension settling in the first year. However two came in very low.

Or, get a quote from a reputable shop to have the headlamps aimed with a professional headlamp aiming tool. Should only be 1/2 hr labor. You may find it to be quite enlightening.

Also, it may be possible that the lamp housing(s) are not installed correctly. Or someone screwed up the adjustment because they didn't know how to change a lamp.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
heymccall;1587644; said:
Find a flat parking lot at night and take a broom handle with you and a piece of tape. With your truck parked level, hold the broom handle vertical in front of the headlamp. Place a piece of tape on the lamp hot spot on the broom handle. Now walk out 15ft or so and see where the hot spot is. It should be slightly lower. Now repeat the other side.

Now, make the necessary corrections. Most of mine were high from the factory and this was exaggerated by the rear suspension settling in the first year. However two came in very low.

Or, get a quote from a reputable shop to have the headlamps aimed with a professional headlamp aiming tool. Should only be 1/2 hr labor. You may find it to be quite enlightening.

Also, it may be possible that the lamp housing(s) are not installed correctly. Or someone screwed up the adjustment because they didn't know how to change a lamp.
wow 32 vehicles? you have got quite a collection. what kinda buisness you into? im assuming landscaping because of the dumps, tree care? lets see some pictures of that fleet.
 

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When aligning your lights, dont worry about the lo-beams, they will take care of themselves. Just stop on a flat dark isolated piece of road. Turn on your hi-beams. Throw a towel/blanket over one of the lights and adjust the other light to whats best for driving. Towel over that light then adjust the other one. Remove towel and drive for a bit to check overall hi-beam performance. Adjust as necessary. Even 1* aiming variation up/down/sideways can make a big difference 500 feet in front.

When you're happy with it, do the all-on mod. Then install silverstars all around. Those roundeyes you linked to are dual-filament hi/lo bulbs (and have the wrong-style connector anyway). You need 4 individual single-filament bulbs - 2 for hi and 2 for lo.

Its what you can SEE that matters, not what some machine or pattern on a wall says the lights SHOULD be adjusted to. If you get bright-lighted a lot when on lo-beam, adjust the lights down/right a bit, otherwise dont worry about where the alignment actually ends up. If that isnt enough, then you could consider auxiliary driving lights....to help find your way to the opthalmologist. :)
 

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here is the best solution. Buy two packs of silverstar ultras, one 9006 for your low beams, and one 9005 for your foglights. Yes your foglights! They will fit perfect without modifications. When you have your lows and fog lights on, it is brighter than sh*t. I get flashed all night long. I have been side by side with cars with HID and they are real similar in how bright they are. I have been running this for almost 2 years, and no melted lenses or wires. I used to run PIAA bulbs, but they kept burning out after 9 months or so. So now I am trying the silverstars, and they are a little cheaper, and brighter. Good luck, and let us know how she works for ya!
 

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hpi_jeep;1587887; said:
wow 32 vehicles? you have got quite a collection. what kinda buisness you into? im assuming landscaping because of the dumps, tree care? lets see some pictures of that fleet.
I'm currently digital camera-less. I maintain a fleet for a municipal sewer contractor. Those are just the license-plated equipment. I also maintain:
7 skidsteers
6 backhoes
1 dozer
3 trackloaders
14 track type excavators
6 rubber tired loaders
7 tow behind compressors, mulchers, etc.
8 trailers
40 small engine saws, pumps, generators, etc
I'd be lying if I said I did it all myself. There is a full time lube guy and a full time welder here, too. But there just parts changers. I get the privelege of figuring out why somthing went bad or why it keeps going bad.
 
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