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Here is a heads up for anyone looking. All new trailers built with Lippert axles in the last several years can have leaking grease seals that will put grease on your trailer brakes. I called Lippert customer service yesterday and asked about having them pay for a brake inspection. They started a claim form.
I asked about doing the work myself since I own a tire repair shop and they agreed to allow me do the work.

I pulled the hubs on the left side of the 5er and all was good. When I pulled the hubs on the right side, I found grease on the magnets and the brake lining.

This 5er is brand new with the only road time being from the manufacturer to the dealer and 400 miles from the dealer home. If you have a new trailer or 5er, check the tag on the axle underneath it. If it is made by Lippert, call Lippert customer service and ask for a free inspection of your brakes.
 

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Oh, I didn't think you bought the Arctic Fox!! Just kidding. Many AF people who have purchased new AF's have had this same problem. Some have even asked for, and received, 4 new fully loaded backing plates. Good that you discovered this now before you were in a situation where you needed non-greasy brakes.

By the way, are your trailer axles the EZ Lube type?
 
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Here is a heads up for anyone looking. All new trailers built with Lippert axles in the last several years can have leaking grease seals that will put grease on your trailer brakes. I called Lippert customer service yesterday and asked about having them pay for a brake inspection. They started a claim form.
I asked about doing the work myself since I own a tire repair shop and they agreed to allow me do the work.

I pulled the hubs on the left side of the 5er and all was good. When I pulled the hubs on the right side, I found grease on the magnets and the brake lining.

This 5er is brand new with the only road time being from the manufacturer to the dealer and 400 miles from the dealer home. If you have a new trailer or 5er, check the tag on the axle underneath it. If it is made by Lippert, call Lippert customer service and ask for a free inspection of your brakes.


Certainly not good to hear, but sounds like you'll get it resolved. I for one, and I'm sure there are many others, that would like to know what the cause and the fix is. Is it to much grease in the hubs, bad seals, undersize axle where the grease seal rides, bearings, or whatever. Would you please post what Lippert says is the problem and what they do to fix it. Thanks


Rich
 

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Lippert claims it was human error with too much grease being placed in the hub, and now they have installed an automated greasing machine to rule out human error. They have also changed over to Red grease. Lippert is supposed to be sending me 2 new loaded backing plates and paying me two hours labor to replace them.
 

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Oh, I didn't think you bought the Arctic Fox!! Just kidding. Many AF people who have purchased new AF's have had this same problem. Some have even asked for, and received, 4 new fully loaded backing plates. Good that you discovered this now before you were in a situation where you needed non-greasy brakes.

By the way, are your trailer axles the EZ Lube type?[/QUOTE

I couldn't sell my wife on the Artic Fox, she just didn't like the floor plans. It won't matter much anyway, because she won't let me take the new 5er hunting, so I am stuck using my old Alumascape for my hunting trips.
 
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I had the same problem with my 2012 Open range, it had Dexter axles. Someone had significantly overgreased the hubs using the grease fitting and likely a power grease gun. I ended up having all 4 hubs with blown out rear seals and grease on the magnets and shoes on every one of them. I cleaned the drums up in the parts cleaner at work and after a bunch of wiping and 6 cans of brake cleaner I had it all back together and working properly.
I personally don't use the grease fitting for this exact reason.

I am not a fan of Lippert, their quality is sketchy on most of their products.
 

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If you have EZ Lube hubs, there's a specified way to grease them. Do not use pneumatic gun, raise wheel and turn it while using hand type grease gun. Dexter has a video on it.
 

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I am familiar with the process, I just chose to not use it. In all the trailers I have serviced I never once found a situation where more grease would have helped. Other than cleaning the bearings and repacking them by hand I see no reason to mess with them. Too much grease is almost just as bad as not enough and if they are serviced properly the grease stays intact.
 

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If EZ Lube is working correctly, it does not add grease. Old grease is pushed out front of hub and replaced with new grease. OTH, I've never had an issue with hand packing trailer bearings.
 

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When there is enough miles on a trailer to require giving the bearings more grease it is also time to check the condition of the braking system.

Thus no need for the EZ Lube. Remove the bearings clean and hand pack with a quality wheel bearing grease.

Also replace the grease seals as they do wear out. If you removed the bearing the grease seal has been damaged or distorted beyond reuse.
 

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It is kind of funny how trailer manufacturers want you to repack wheel bearings every 3000 miles, do they think they invented tapered bearings? For all of the years I drove vehicles with packable bearings, mostly 4x4s they were lucky to get the bearings packed every 50k unless there was another reason to go inside and sometimes there was, broken axles, blown posi's oh yeah the good old days. Anyway, back from the bunny trail, for an eze lube system to be effective, there should be some sort of a grease slinger to keep the pressure of adding grease off of the seal so that it will move forward. Add too much grease and you risk pushing the seal out of the bore. In the case of these trailer axles, the grease got by the seal lips, the seals were not pushed out of the bore, most of this can be blamed on grease that was too thin. I good high quality grease and a good hand packing can't be beat. The only exception to this is on boat trailers, where I want the entire cavity full of waterproof grease so the there is no room for water to ruin the bearings. Trailer brakes get hot, so a heavy grease with a high temp drop point is my preference. My brakes are cleaned up and I am heading to the Big Horn Mnts' this coming weekend. The grade is about 10 miles of constant 7 percent grade, so on the way down, the brakes will get a work out and so will the engine brake on the new L5P. Hopefully the new brakes will show up soon and I will wash all of the factory grease out and fix it the right way. Nothing like spending a pile of cash on a new vehicle so you can fix it as soon as you get it.
 
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Sure is a beautiful trailer you bought. Now that you've been out for a trip, what do you think? Any surprises?
 

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Perhaps I don't understand the EZ Lube system design, but I don't believe it should ordinarily put pressure on the seal — unless far too much grease is added under high pressure. E-Z Lube System But having been at this a long time, I very much agree that annual bearing repack is unnecessary if high quality grease is used (I have had good experience with Valvoline Synpower). In conversation, Dexter agrees, unless conditions are extreme (salt, dirt, etc.).
 

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I use a bearing packer/greaser,[put the clean bearing in and press down,pushes grease thru bearing],


I just had to pack a bearing by hand on the road a month ago [what a mess,,


and I just picked up a used trailer and it had bearing buddys on it,i had to put in 4-5 pumps of grease 5 miles into a 200 mile drive to cool down all 4 corners [it had 4 lug 12'' wheels],I always bring a laser temp gun and a hand grease gun ,when every I go get somebody elses trailer,,and if im moving somebody elses trailer,and it has sat for 1-2 years,it gets all new tires and bearings repacked/brakes ck'd or replaced,,or I wont tow it,im done fixing somebodys junk in a parking lot or rest area


I just last summer trailered a boat ,27' center console from Orlando-to-long beach to go to Hawaii,had somebody there repack bearings and add 2 new tires [said 2 old ones were good],I got into Arizona and had 2 blow-outs in 15 miles,i brought along 4 spare tire/wheels off my trailer,i put on all 4 tires and went the rest of the way,i changed back to his tires in long beach harbor and left the 2 blown tires there,
 

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Sure is a beautiful trailer you bought. Now that you've been out for a trip, what do you think? Any surprises?
Overall I like the trailer, I think their advertising about how great the insulation is leaves a bit to be desired. It amazes me how a trailer manufacturer can claim how well the floor is insulated and not take into consideration what a big heat sink the frame rails are, not to mention the holes in the frame for the slides. My axles are also easy lube.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
 

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The problem with using the easy lube system is that you have no idea of knowing that the seals are not leaking. In order for the process to work, a certain amount of pressure has to be exerted on the inner part of the seal to force grease forward. The hub is effectively totally filled with grease, which is a good thing if water is encountered, like for boat trailers, but unnecessary with 5th wheels. If the pressure overrides what the seal can handle, grease will get by and eventually end up on the brakes. I would rather have an oil bath set up for the bearings, but then when a seal fails it definitely gets the brakes oiled.
 

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" In order for the process to work, a certain amount of pressure has to be exerted on the inner part of the seal to force grease forward. The hub is effectively totally filled with grease, which is a good thing if water is encountered, like for boat trailers, but unnecessary with 5th wheels." You may be right. I don't have the EZ Lube, but looked into getting that system which came out just after we bought our Fox. It requires an entirely different hub. But it is my understanding that EZ Lube does not fill the cavity with grease. I would really like to know in more detail how it works and if it actually pressures the seal. If it does, that is a certain recipe for grease on the brakes eventually.
 

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" In order for the process to work, a certain amount of pressure has to be exerted on the inner part of the seal to force grease forward. The hub is effectively totally filled with grease, which is a good thing if water is encountered, like for boat trailers, but unnecessary with 5th wheels." You may be right. I don't have the EZ Lube, but looked into getting that system which came out just after we bought our Fox. It requires an entirely different hub. But it is my understanding that EZ Lube does not fill the cavity with grease. I would really like to know in more detail how it works and if it actually pressures the seal. If it does, that is a certain recipe for grease on the brakes eventually.
The hub is the same as a non easy lube hub, the axle ends however are drilled in several places, one is right behind the inner bearing. When grease is applied the hole shoots grease angled forward behind the inner bearing, the problem is that in order for the grease to flow through the inner bearing and reach the outer bearing and then purge the old grease out, it requires the entire hub to be filled with grease and while doing so it will also put pressure on the inside of the seal. The preferred method for adding grease is to apply grease to the zerk fitting while turning the hub, this still puts some pressure on the seal.

I have hand packed bearings with bad seals and never had grease get on the brakes, because it stays put. The only time pressurizing grease is a good idea in a hub is when the hub will be submerged in water.
 
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