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so should i just go with a bumper pull instead of a gooseneck or 5th? the tow capacity is 12k it does have a class 4 hitch and i can get a weight distributions at 12k.
Short answer "NO"..... not necessarily.

See my picture. That is a 38 footer hitched up. 13,800 trailer gross on the placard. Trailer axles are 6,000 each, and the pin weight should be 1800 lbs. I never load the trailer axle to the 12,000 total. But filling the front closet and the basement can over load the pin.

The limiting factor for me is the truck rear axle. Tough to keep the pin weight under 2000, so that when the trailer is on the truck the rear axle is under 6000 limit.

Empty (what ever weight that is), that trailer pulls beautiful!!!

Loaded up rigged and ready, I know it is heavy and drive accordingly. I weight every chance I get if I see an open highway scale. The gross combination on mine is usually about 21,500, so the axles are the limiting factors.

If your truck has the fifth wheel, ask the dealer to let you weight the truck and trailer. Then think about where you are going to add the 2000 - 3000 of supplies and stay under the limits. Don't go by the "cargo carrying capacity" ( CC) on the placards. Go by and think about the ACTUAL WEIGHTS when loaded. You will accumulate junk in both the truck and the trailer that changes the CC. So weight the rig.
 

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I bought a Sherline scale so I could measure the pin as I shuffled things around. They are accurate enough for the job. I have both the 2000 and 5000lb gauges. I found that weight on the back of the trailer doesn't translate to a direct drop in the pin weight nor does front basement weight add directly to the pin but most of it does. Depending on the trailer the tanks could be anywhere and how they impact the pin is a guess.

The scale takes the guessing out.
 

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The bottom line is that as big as these trucks are, the ratings, the HD designation and people's expectations, the 2500HD trucks don't have all that much capacity when it comes to 5th wheels. It's certainly gotten better over the last couple of years but unless you want to go with a small 5th wheel, the 2500HD is probably too small. I had to go to a 3500 SRW to get the additional CC I needed for my 5th wheel and I am right at that CC limit. If a person decides to go over the ratings then there is no limit. If it doesn't break it must be fine.
yup, trucks GVWR keeps going up, but so does empty weight and trailer weights. My 04.5 duramax has a 9200GVWR and 7200 empty= 2000 for cargo.

My 2015 denali, same exact body style has 10,000 GWVR. Did I gain 800lbs in cargo capacity?? NOPE!!! I gained about 200lbs. New truck weights 7800 empty, which leaves me with only 200lbs more CC. granted the Denali does have more "stuff", but I suspect the new chassis is also heavier.

IMHO the 3/4 ton diesels are capable of towing some 5thwheels and staying within GVWR if your careful. But many are going to put you over GVWR. Especially when you have a crew cab and 4wd. Go to a extended cab 2WD and it will make a noticeable difference in empty weight and give you lots more trailer choices.

Power is no longer an issue, in the past, you often wouldn't go over GVWR because if you did you'd find it was REALLY hard to get up hills, and even struggle on flat ground. No longer the case at least with the diesels.

I know there are lots of discussions/arguments that the existing GVWR on at least 3/4 tons is arbitrary low and doesn't really reflect what the truck is really capable of carrying safely. That discussion will go on forever.
 

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yup, trucks GVWR keeps going up, but so does empty weight and trailer weights. My 04.5 duramax has a 9200GVWR and 7200 empty= 2000 for cargo.

My 2015 denali, same exact body style has 10,000 GWVR. Did I gain 800lbs in cargo capacity?? NOPE!!! I gained about 200lbs. New truck weights 7800 empty, which leaves me with only 200lbs more CC. granted the Denali does have more "stuff", but I suspect the new chassis is also heavier.

...
Well that's not what I expected. I thought the new trucks increased the payload without a major increase in their weight. Seems they just upped the gross to overcome the extra weight.

I did notice that a lot of commercial people tow with a dually 2WD standard cab gasser. Those seem to have the highest capacity since (as you said), no crew/ext, no 4WD and the D/A subtracts from the gross. I don't know if the D/A increases the gross though.
 

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Well that's not what I expected. I thought the new trucks increased the payload without a major increase in their weight. Seems they just upped the gross to overcome the extra weight.

I did notice that a lot of commercial people tow with a dually 2WD standard cab gasser. Those seem to have the highest capacity since (as you said), no crew/ext, no 4WD and the D/A subtracts from the gross. I don't know if the D/A increases the gross though.
looking at the "fine print" the big cargo capacity is usually for a 2wd, std cab with gas engine. long bed reduced cargo capacity some, 4wd is a big hit, duramax an even bigger hit. AFAIK the Duramax doesn't have a higher GVWR in the 1 ton. with a 3/4 ton Durmax is 10K, gas is lower with a 10K GVWR optional. Duramax does have a higher towing capacity than the gas.

basically you can buy a 1 ton srw GMC/Silverado for very very close to the same price as a equally optioned 3/4 ton and gain 1500lbs in GVWR and probably close to 1500lbs in cargo capacity. But SRW 1 ton is hard to find, most around here at least are DRW
 

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I was just thinking they hadn't gotten that much heavier.
 

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I know there are lots of discussions/arguments that the existing GVWR on at least 3/4 tons is arbitrary low and doesn't really reflect what the truck is really capable of carrying safely. That discussion will go on forever.
It would be interesting to see some empirical data on the number of accidents directly related to towing overweight and by how much. As best as I can determine, there is little difference between a 2500 and 3500 except the rear springs at least through 2010. This argument is supported by little weight and price difference between the two and the drive train parts number being the same. It makes it hard to trust the reliability of the "door label". I know quite a few people who tow over cargo weight specs without incident.
I'm not advocating towing overweight. It would be nice to know what percentage or pounds overweight that would significantly increase risk of losing control. Its hard to fathom that exceeding the GVWR by a couple or three hundred pounds would put you in dire straits.
 

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It would be interesting to see some empirical data on the number of accidents directly related to towing overweight and by how much. As best as I can determine, there is little difference between a 2500 and 3500 except the rear springs at least through 2010. This argument is supported by little weight and price difference between the two and the drive train parts number being the same. It makes it hard to trust the reliability of the "door label". I know quite a few people who tow over cargo weight specs without incident.
I'm not advocating towing overweight. It would be nice to know what percentage or pounds overweight that would significantly increase risk of losing control. Its hard to fathom that exceeding the GVWR by a couple or three hundred pounds would put you in dire straits.
2015 is kinda the same situation. 3/4 ton and 1 ton SRW appear to have very very little differences in drivetrain but a 1500lb difference in GVWR. And base price between them is virtually identical.

But then if the 2500 and 3500SRW had the same GVWR why offer two different models???
 

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I don't know other than a marketing tool and heavier rear springs. A couple years back I talk to GM supervisor from an Ohio plant. He told me I was wrong about the only difference is the rear springs. He said they also stand on one foot and whistle dixie when they install them.
 

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nope nope, nope the 9200 is Gross vehicle weight rating of the truck. doesn't make any difference if your pulling a trailer or not. the max legal weight of the truck is 9200lbs. when you go over the scales. period. legally you must be at or under the axle ratings, the tire ratings AND the GVWR.
DOT allows you to be at max axle ratings. I have to go over all scales and have never been warned or fined. Again you have to have like rated tires, yes they do check.
 

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2005 Duramax Owner: Fifth wheel help please!!!

I own a 2005 long-bed duramax 2500 HD Crew Cab truck. I am at a loss as to what size fifth wheel I can pull. I have worked through all the numbers for my truck:

9200 lbs GVW
22,000 lbs GCVWR
Maximum trailer weight (per manual) 12,000 lbs
Rear axle: 6048 lbs
Front axle 4800 lbs

When I weighed my truck, with all passengers and equipment, it had the following weights

Front axle: 4600
Rear axle 3750
Total: 8350

So, my understanding is that I can only place an additional 850 lbs of load on my truck! How is that possible? I understand braking and all that, but this is ridiculous! Can anyone lend a hand? Am I missing something here?

Thanks!
 

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Nope, that about covers it. As you are finding, the 2500's don't have a lot of capacity and I only get 700 more than you.
 

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Your read of the weight number is spot on, so consider the these thoughts........

What bites you is the long bed (weights more), crew cab (weights more) that is still within the 9200 gross weight that 2500HD's work with.

If you look at the rear axle rating (6240) minus the rear axle tare weight (3750) you could have about 2290 additional weight on the rear axle (weight of the trailer pin on the truck).

That will put the truck over its gross rating to about 10640. The so called weight police may call you on that number. But many more stay under the axle ratings and drive accordingly. Make sure your trailer brakes are in top shape and working good to slow the trailer. Also with that weight be prepared to not allow the trailer to sway the truck too much.

See my picture.... I run under the 6240 rear axle rating, but over the gross. It works, but I do drive accordingly and prudently.
 

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I own a 2005 long-bed duramax 2500 HD Crew Cab truck. I am at a loss as to what size fifth wheel I can pull. I have worked through all the numbers for my truck:

9200 lbs GVW
22,000 lbs GCVWR
Maximum trailer weight (per manual) 12,000 lbs
Rear axle: 6048 lbs
Front axle 4800 lbs

When I weighed my truck, with all passengers and equipment, it had the following weights

Front axle: 4600
Rear axle 3750
Total: 8350

So, my understanding is that I can only place an additional 850 lbs of load on my truck! How is that possible? I understand braking and all that, but this is ridiculous! Can anyone lend a hand? Am I missing something here?

Thanks!
Read my earlier post. As long as you are not over your axle rating's you are good if the tires are correct also. DOT goes by the bridge formula which would legally allow you to tow even more but I would recommend staying close to the axle rating's and under the tire rating's. Like already posted this is assuming brakes are up to snuff trailer and truck. I tow commercial with the truck In my sig and have to go over the scales so I know what I am talking about.
 

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Good for what? Why not just ignore that too?
 

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Good for what? Why not just ignore that too?
The what is understanding how the law on vehicle weight works.

In most cases the gross weight limit of the power unit (our pick-up truck or a highway tractor) does not count for much.

For example, a tandem KW rated for a gross weight of 45,000, may have a gross combination rating of 80,000.

But that same KW could also hook onto a 24 axle 96 tire trailer for a gross combination of 405,000 lbs. Just for power they may put a tandem pusher on the back to speed the move and may allow the combination weight to be 450,000 lbs. Needs a permit to move and the permit is issued on the axle weights (using tire ratings).

That is an extreme example of what the law looks at when considering the what and how to weigh a unit or a combination unit (our pick-up & RV trailer). The weight rules are the same for commercial or private vehicles. The weight does effect the paper work required for each unit, but that is a different discussion.
 
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I think I'm going to just replace my 2500 badges with 3500's and call it good.��
 
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I can't speak for differences in other years because I haven't looked for them. But in my 2008 , the differences between 3500 vs 2500 (disregarding dually vs SRW) are in the tires (265 vs 245 - 3415 capy vs 3042 capy) and in the wheels - 7" wheels needed for the 265 tires, 6 1/2: wheels for the 245's. As discussed in many threads, the axle itself will handle 10K, way over what the tires will support. If you look at your rear axle weight rating, it will be limited by the capacity of the tires, in my case, 6084 lbs for the stock 245 tires.

If having a 6830 lbs rear axle capacity with the 265's vs 6084 with the 245's is sufficient for your purposes, than that's something that can be added by most anyone. There may be other tires available, higher ply rating, etc that would boost load carrying capacity even more. And of course, you can add additional spring if you primarily carry heavy weights. Your ride will suffer accordingly, particularly when empty.

You will likely never have a problem if you are over your GVWR, but never go over your axle capacity (read tire capacity). For that you will pay dearly.
 
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