Diesel Place banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
156 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I used to put it in my Cummins, and know of people who swear by it. Anybody ever use this in their Duramax?

And what's your opinions???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,848 Posts
Never heard of it. Where do you get it?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
735 Posts
Never heard of it. Where do you get it?
I can't think of a place that doesn't sell it. Check autozone or wally world or just about any place that sells auto supplies like oil and such.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,361 Posts
Is it any good for diesels , it looks like it is only sold for gassers:confused:
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
735 Posts
Is it any good for diesels , it looks like it is only sold for gassers:confused:
If I remember correctly, on the bottle it says " Gas and Diesel Engines".
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
735 Posts
WHEN ADDED TO GASOLINE MARVEL MYSTERY OIL:​
  • Cleans and lubricates fuel injectors and carburetors
  • Improves gasoline mileage
  • Reduces and prevents varnish and gum build-up
  • Extends spark plug life
  • Safe for catalytic converters and oxygen sensors
WHEN MARVEL MYSTERY OIL IS ADDED TO DIESEL:
  • Increases fuel mileage
  • Cleans and keeps fuel pumps, injectors and nozzles free from harmful residues
  • Reduces upper cylinder wear
  • Promotes longer piston ring life
  • Retards souring of diesel and lubricates entire engine system
WHEN ADDED TO MOTOR OIL:
  • Prevents valve sticking and clatter
  • Fortifies properties of engine oil, prevents breakdown caused by extreme temperatures
  • Promotes easier cold weather starts
  • Reduces and prevents acid and sludge formation
WHEN ADDED TO MARINE ENGINES
  • can be used on inboard and outboard engines
  • aids in winterizing other engine lubricants
  • protects against oil congealing
This came from a distributors web site.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,361 Posts
Went on their web page and couldn't find anything where it says diesels included in their product . Not saying it isn't just didn't see it. You are probably right that is good for diesels. May go out and try some
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
:nopics:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,361 Posts
Huh. You don't seem to have Java Script enabled! -- Dan Ford
HOME > MARVEL MYSTERY OIL Marvel & other solutions to the lead problem

For all practical purposes, 80 octane aviation gasoline is no longer available, forcing the Cub driver to choose between 100LL avgas and 87 octane automotive gasoline (assuming that he has the necessary STC and that "mogas" is sold at the airport). Each fuel has its own problem. Despite the low-lead designation, 100LL contains too much lead for the older, low-compression engines. Mogas, on the other hand, doesn't have enough: some lead is needed to lubricate the valves.
Robert Parker uses Marvel Mystery Oil to reduce the buildup of lead from 100LL. He explained why in a post on the Cub Builders mailing list, which I have adapted here with his permission. Bob's article is followed by an email I received from Terry Lutz, expanding on Marvel and the alternative TCP. -- Dan Ford That Marvel-ous Mystery Oil


by Robert Parker
Back in the late 1940s and early 1950s, at military air bases there were 55-gallon barrels labeled MMO (Marvel Mystery Oil). I forget the MIL spec number.... We had charts that told us how many gallons of MMO to put in per tank of fuel.
72 octane is the highest grade of gasoline that can be manufactured without [additives].
80/87 has 0.50 ml TEL [tetra-ethyl lead] per gallon and is dyed RED
91/96 2.00 ml TEL per gallon BLUE
100LL 2.00 ml TEL per gallon BLUE
100/130 3.00 ml TEL per gallon GREEN
115/145 4.60 ml TEL per gallon PURPLE
The amount of TEL in the higher grade fuels has increased the lead build up and fouling of spark plugs, along with valve erosion incidents, reported on some lower compression engines.
You know when you pull a magneto check at the runup area after a considerable taxi to get there, and you are running straight 100LL. You have a RPM drop that is excessive, and run the engine up to a higher RPM for a few seconds and then recheck gives a normal drop.
Why does this happen? There is a bromide chemical in 100LL that is supposed to keep the TEL vaporized and the excess pushed out the exhaust, and this bromide has to be at a certain temperature to work correctly. This temperature can only be achieved in our small engines at 1100 to 1200 RPM. How many of us taxi at this RPM? (If you answered, I do, how often do you have to change your brake pads?)
The automotive gasoline option. There there are two STCs on the market for mo-gas, EAA and Petersen. (I use Petersen's. If you have a question and call, Petersen has an answer for you. EAA has an answer, after 5 different people and the fifth one says let me check and I will get back with you. Sometime they do, and other times that's the last you hear.) Petersen's STC allows for mixing of av-gas and mo-gas. You can put mo-gas in the tank 75% (TEL 0.002 ml) and 25% av-gas (100LL at 2.00 ml TEL) and you have the same 0.50 ml TEL that 80/87 had.
Another way is to run about three tanks of mo-gas and the fourth is a tank of av-gas (100LL) Either of these work OK. That fourth tank however, you will still have the spark plug fouling syndrome.
The TCP/Marvel Mystery Oil option: These are most likely about the same thing, with small changes in the recipe, so as not to infringe on another's copyright. Both are high in detergents to do the cleaning job. Neither should be used for the first time on a high time engine; about half TBO or less should be the cut-off time, for first use.
IN OIL SYSTEM
Use one pint Marvel Mystery Oil about 5 hours before oil change. If screen type system, be sure to clean screen. Then, in the new oil, install one-half pint MMO. This cleans the carbon and sludge collected in the engine passages and crevices and hydraulic lifters, and stores it in the bottom of the oil kidney. Some will make it to the screen, but either place it will be removed at oil change.
IN THE FUEL SYSTEM
Use the directions on the back for amount to put in the fuel per gallon of fuel (4 to 6 oz. per 10 gallons of fuel). MMO goes through the carburetor as a droplet, broken up like the fuel. When it enters the combustion chamber and the gasoline ignites, it is vaporized and soaks into the carbon buildup on cumbustion chamber walls, valve guides, around the valve stem, and on the spark plug. It soaks into the carbon and eventually loosens it up and it goes out the exhaust system.
Now you know how it works, I will neither recommend or not recommend the procedure. Like Fox News says,"I report and you decide". I do know it will help when lifters start to be lazy and not do their job. When valves are beginning to stick, it will free then up. Some people swear by it, some people swear at it, but results is what really tells the tale. Marvel Mystery Oil and TCP


by Terry Lutz
Since 80-octane fuel has disappeared from Michigan, there has been a lot of talk about what to do so that lead fouling can be avoided in the smaller and older engines. The leading theory is to use Marvel Mystery Oil. This is generally regarded as good stuff, and a lot of people are using it. Mystery Oil is a top cylinder lubricant, so when it vaporizes during combustion, oil droplets are spread around the valves, guides, and rings to keep things moving. It works, and has for a long time. The old timers would use it to free up stuck rings and valves by giving the engine a "Mystery Oil Enema". The trick on a 65 hp Continental is to take the primer line off the carburetor, hook up a tube, and run Mystery Oil through directly through the carburetor while the engine is running. This creates great clouds of smoke, and extends engine a life for a few more hours. You can also just pour the stuff into the cylinders and run the engine.
Then there is ALCOR TCP. This is a fuel additive specifically designed to scavenge the lead from the fuel to keep lead from ever forming on vital engine parts. But how does it work? Inquiring minds want to know, so I called the 800 number on the side of the can. A nice fellow named Rick told me that TCP stands for Tri-Cresyl-Phosphate. It was created during WWII because the cooler cylinders on the multi-row radial engines would lead foul, creating lots of engine problems. Remember too, that lead is added to aviation fuel to boost octane rating, and with the high manifold pressures the wartime engines were operating at, Tetra Ethyl Lead (TEL) was a necessity. When piston engines passed by the wayside in the military, Shell Oil bought the formula for TCP and used it for years in car gas, which was also blended with TEL. Of course, when unleaded fuel came out, there was no further need for TCP. But aviation fuel continued to contain lead, so the formula was purchased by ALCOR. 100LL fuel still contains 4 times the lead that our friendly 80 octane had. So, "How do it woik?" At the instant of combustion, there is a chemical reaction between TCP and the lead in the fuel to form lead phosphate, which comes out of the exhaust stack as a grey powder. The lead does not remain in the engine, and can't build up on valves and guides to mess up your engine. It only takes a few ounces of TCP to treat 10 gallons of gas. However, the carrier is toluene, and there's some xylene in there, too. You don't spill this stuff on your paint job, and is difficult to carry it with you in the airplane. The container says not to do it. Be careful and informed out there!!
ADVERTISEMENTS
See the Warbird's Bookshelf
Favorites - Flying Tiger Store Piper Cub Store - Zero Store Brewster Buffalo Store
Taildragger book






Low and Slow - The Pacific War from 500 AGL, including a dogfight with a Zero

Huh. You don't seem to have Java Script enabled! -- Dan FordDan Ford's books






Incident at Muc Wa - first and best of the Vietnam novels - 'Sad, bawdy, and compelling' (Detroit Free Press)

Huh. You don't seem to have Java Script enabled! -- Dan FordQuestion?

If you have a question or opinion, post it on the discussion boards. Click here:
Subscribe!

Once or twice a month, I send out an email about these websites and the topics thereon. Click here for more. -- Dan Ford
Piper Cub stuff at eBay



Home | Piper Cub Store | Google us | Advertise with us | About these websites | Question? | Discussion boards
Affiliated sites: Warbird's Forum | Dan Ford's books | UNH 1954 | Brave Bungee | Expedition Sail | danford dot net Posted June 2004. Websites ©1997-2004 Daniel Ford; all rights reserved.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
..... just kidding

I happened to have a bottle handy so I snapped a pic.

Marvel 2 (Custom).JPG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
412 Posts
I have run MMO in every vehicle I've owned for the last 30 years at a rate of 4 oz/10 gallons fuel, including my Duramax. I don't run it in the oil. What sold me on it is that it is very big in the small aircraft circle as far as keeping the fuel systems spotless and dependability at a maximum level (which is critical in an airplane!). Do a google-groups search and you will see what I mean. Also it DOES say for gas and diesel on the bottle.

WalMart here sells the gallon plastic jugs for $9.99, by far the cheapest I've found...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
412 Posts
One more tip...A little MMO on a rag is a very good cleaner for stubborn substances....):h
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,537 Posts
Those stubborn stains on the back seat cushions:D

Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
412 Posts
Oh, things like tape or glue residues, tar, stubborn grease, gummy buildup on surfaces...stuff like that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,861 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
574 Posts
I have run MMO in every vehicle I've owned for the last 30 years at a rate of 4 oz/10 gallons fuel, including my Duramax. I don't run it in the oil. What sold me on it is that it is very big in the small aircraft circle as for as keeping the fuel systems spotless and dependability at a maximum level (which is critical in an airplane!). Do a google-groups search and you will see what I mean. Also it DOES say for gas and diesel on the bottle.

WalMart here sells the gallon plastic jugs for $9.99, by far the cheapest I've found...
I'm not wanting to step on any toes here and I have no factual knowledge regarding MMO. I have been involved for many years in General Aviation (sold my PA 28-180) and have held active Airframe & Powerplant mechanic ratings for many years and have overhauled everything from old radials w/ pressure carbs to turbines as well as lab work. As much as I dislike government regs, they are definitely needed in aviation. Thank God there is little an owner can do with their plane without mechanic ratings as "hangar legends" abound. The MMO is one that's been around forever. If it ever had "MIL Specs" I'd sure like to see the numbers. Though I've experimented on my own plane with Alcor a few times, I've never recommended MMO, would never put it in an aircraft engine and have never heard an A&P Mechanic recommend it. If there was a real problem with lead (TEL) fouling it would have been addressed with an FAA Directive long ago (yes I'm aware of the STCs for auto gas). A Continental or Lycoming will generally run trouble free for 2000 hrs when maintained by the book and the owner isn't "trying to make things better" with something they heard about. Just a few decades of experience and lots of skepticism. Just wanted to counter balance the statement that " it's very big in the aircraft circle" so as to keep a greater perspective - it's not widely used in GA aircraft (in my experience). I have no idea if it's good or bad for a diesel. It looks like you've logged lots of time with it without problems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Just started using Marvel oil mix 4 0z to 10 gals of Jet A in my 06 duramax 6.6Using it for lubricity as jet fuel does not have same lube properties as Diesel fuel. Running normal 42 Cetain fuel and Jet A mix. Have acess to free Jet A and can't resist using it. I'll let you Know how its working out within the next year. I have no idea of the Cetain rating of Jet A but I Know a few guys who have run exclusively Jet A in Diesel Rabit Volkswagons for over 100,000 miles some ran marvel mystery oil but others just put any old 30 wt oil, even turbine oil in the 4oz to 10 gallon ratio with no fuel pump or injector problems. I have a friend that runs one of the largest truck wrecking yards in the north east and he swears by running Marvel oil in all the heavy equipment diesels. Just a cap full in every tank of fuel. I too fix aircraft for a livin and i can't see any harm in running Marvel in the fuel but I would hesitate to use it in the oil, unless your going to pickel up the engine for an extended period of time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
I ran MMO intermitently in a 1981 Isuzu PuP Diesel (4 cyl compact truck) for a little less than 300,000 miles. Granted it has nothing in common with the DMAX except Isuzu genes but...I just poured a seat of the pants "few ounces" per tank, most of the time. The only issues I ever had that shut it down road side were 1) broken alternater wire 2) seized idler pulley bearing 3) a single clogged fuel filter after a bad tank of fuel. The powertain was great...but the body completely fell apart (literally). At 300k I gave it to a friend who hit a deer at 478k. It was then confined to offroad farm duty. I am not sure what happened after that. If I had another one it would be a great BD experiment machine.
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top