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Discussion Starter #1
Lately here in MI it's been very cold. All winter long I didn't really have a problem starting my truck but since it's been dancing around 0* and under lately, it's been pretty tough to start.

Plugging it in isn't really an option since I park it on the street. I'd have to run close to 50 ft of extension cord to the truck since she leaks, er, sweats horse power. :D

My fuel system has no leaks, the fuel filter is new, as far as I know the fuel heater works, and I have a manual glow plug controller.

For the first startup during normal winter weather I:
hold the glow plug switch for 8 secs
release
count to 7
hold switch for 5 secs
release
count to 4
hold switch for 3 secs
release
try to start

It will crank for about 5 secs, start to catch and then start within 10 secs. It will usually stall shortly after and I count to 15 then hold the switch for 3-5 secs and try to start again and it usually starts and stays running.

Since it's been so cold it's just a game of cat and mouse. It seems like it want's to start since it does that start and stall thing but it does it about 5 or 6 times now before it stays running.

Is it just the bitter cold and these things are a pain to start? Or could something be wrong?

Once it starts it runs great with no weird noises, stalling issues, or lack of power.

Is there an additive I should be running in the winter? Every once in a while I run dieselkleen through it. All the diesel pumps in my area have switched over to the 2007 and up stuff. Very low sulphur.

Thanks.
 

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I would recommend the long electrical cord and plug it in. It will start like its a warm summer day and your truck will love you.

Gerald
 

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If your running AC60G's you can cycle them longer than you have been. 7-8 seconds isn't enough for them to get up to temp properly. I'll cycle them 15 seconds once when it's colder and she fires right up. Even at -20C so far so good. Once she first fires up I cycle them 5 seconds off 5 on a couple of times and she smooths right out.
 

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It's just the cold. It is REALLY cold here in MI. To make it start easier you will need an extension cord...

Some antigel in the fuel might help. I use heavy doses of the stuff in my truck, but I can't remember what brand I've been buying.

Last night it was well below zero and I fired up my truck because I needed to run some 12V stuff off of it (it hasn't run very much because it is too cold to go to work) and it did fire up all right, but I couldn't get it to heat up much at all (idling in the driveway with the block heater plugged in). After about 20 minutes it finally warmed up enough that the fast idle kicked down, but that was it. Finally I rigged the throttle and put cardboard on the radiator (I've never had to do that to my 6.2 before) and ten minutes later I had some heat... :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Gerald yelland;1575306; said:
I would recommend the long electrical cord and plug it in. It will start like its a warm summer day and your truck will love you.

Gerald
I was told that I would need a special kind of extension. My friend owns a Hummer (the real kind) and he told me he plugged his in one night with a heavy duty cord and in the morning the cord was brittle and burnt like it got way too hot. Was this a problem with his cord or heater or both?

rock_shoes said:
If your running AC60G's you can cycle them longer than you have been. 7-8 seconds isn't enough for them to get up to temp properly. I'll cycle them 15 seconds once when it's colder and she fires right up. Even at -20C so far so good. Once she first fires up I cycle them 5 seconds off 5 on a couple of times and she smooths right out.
I have no idea what gp's are in there, they were in there when I bought it and they are new. When my automatic glow plug switch was still working it usually ran the plugs about 8-10 seconds first then cycle with 5-3 second bursts every few seconds.

High Sierra 2500 said:
It's just the cold. It is REALLY cold here in MI. To make it start easier you will need an extension cord...
Same as above, do I need a special cord esspecially since I'm going about 50 ft. ?
 

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i've never heard of that problem with an extension cord. at my apartment complex last winter i used a 100 ft extension cord, typical orange one, no problems.
 

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Yeah, don't use a cheap cord like you would use to run a work light, but it doesn't need to be ridiculously heavy either. The stock block heater is 650W which works out to about 6A.

I run a 50' orange cord to my truck and it stays plugged in all night (and all day if I don't drive it). I would recommend something a little heavier for it to be 100% "proper", but I've never had a problem.

Sounds like there was something wrong with the block heater or the cord on the Hummer... Either that or it has some sort of an aftermarket heater on it that draws some serious current.
 

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I would gauge the size of the extension to be used by the size of the cord under the hood that goes to the heater. Maybe a little larger than that unless that cord isn't large enough, which would be very bad.
 

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You should really find out what glow plugs you have. if you do not have 60gs you can mushroom the heads and they will be very difficult to get out of the heads if not impossible without removing the head. It is easy to check just get a 10mm deep well and pull out the easiest one to get to. Now this does not guarantee that they will all be 60g but it is a good start. glow plugs are cheap $9 at a auto parts store for 60g.

If you start you diesel cold be sure not to "get on it" till it warms up good. These diesels do not like to run cold and it is hard on them to drive them hard when cold.

When I start mine cold I usually let it idle for 10min or longer. If I can't I just accelerate slow for about 15min.
 

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I would assume you have either 9G's or 11G's until you have a chance to pull the plugs and confirm. Wouldn't want to mushroom them by cycling them like you would a 60G.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
rock_shoes;1575959; said:
I would assume you have either 9G's or 11G's until you have a chance to pull the plugs and confirm. Wouldn't want to mushroom them by cycling them like you would a 60G.
That's why I only cycle them for 8 secs at the most, it seems to be what the automatic controler did. I've read some of the horror stories on here about mushroomed plugs. :eek:

I'll pull one or two later in teh week when it warms up to a balmby 20*. :rolleyes:

I'll also go get a good heavy duty cord to plug into. I have an orange 50ft cord but I don't remember if its heavy or medium duty.
 

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A medium duty should do fine for your block-heater. They only draw somewhere around 650 watts. The reason the controller glowed around 8 seconds stock is because they were originally set to be used with faster glowing plugs (ie. 11G's) than the 60G's.
 

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The problem is voltage drop over a 50ft length. 16AWG would do it 14AWG would be better 12AWG would be best. I would do 14AWG, 12AWG is expensive.
 

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My truck is plugged into a 50' 14awg, and the cord doesn't get warm or brittle.
The block heater makes a world of difference. In the morning all the other cars in the driveway all have frost on the windows, and my windows are clear. Not to mention how much easier and better it runs and starts in the morning.
 

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jm8881;1575806; said:
I was told that I would need a special kind of extension. My friend owns a Hummer (the real kind) and he told me he plugged his in one night with a heavy duty cord and in the morning the cord was brittle and burnt like it got way too hot. Was this a problem with his cord or heater or both?
?
The probleme is the Hummer;)

the real one dont use a 650W block heater like we do :D

Ed
 

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Get:
G60's
00 gauge batt to starter cable
Intake heaters
The most important thing to have by far is all your glow plugs working.
After that, Of those 3 I listed the most important is the 00 gauge cable.
G60's, at least you know they will get hot with the auto timer.
Intake heaters, they help a bit on IDI's.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
oil pan 4;1577882; said:
Get:
G60's
00 gauge batt to starter cable
Intake heaters
The most important thing to have by far is all your glow plugs working.
After that, Of those 3 I listed the most important is the 00 gauge cable.
G60's, at least you know they will get hot with the auto timer.
Intake heaters, they help a bit on IDI's.
I have 1 gauge wire on my batteries. I couldn't get 00 gauge the day I really needed it. Had to get my truck started so I "settled" for 1 gauge.

I still have to check my gp's. How will I know what kind they are, will there be a part number on them like G60?
 

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1 gauge is plenty big enough.

To find out what kind of glow plugs you have, remove one (or several if you think it might be a mismatched set) and if it is covered in carbon wipe it off with a paper towel. The glow plug type will be written around the plug just below the threads...
 

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jm8881;1575806; said:
I was told that I would need a special kind of extension.
If you only have the stock block heater (in the frost plug hole) it is only 400 watts - i.e. around 3 amps at 120 VAC. You could run 200 feet of 12 gauge extension cord, or 100 feet of 14 gauge - and it will run your heater just fine. You just have to watch out for some of the el-cheapos that are all rubber and almost no wire - often 16 or 18 gauge and only suitable to run a few light bulbs.

You are way better off to use the heater. It will save wear and tear on everything else including the engine itself. If you must start without it - the Wellman plugs work better than the Delco 60Gs - in regard to heating faster, and staying hot longer after being shut-off. But - 60Gs also work well enough if you have them cycling properly. Here's some specs on how both work:


Wellman GO50 plug for 6.2 and 6.5 diesels
2 seconds - 10.2 volts, 13.6 amps and 1500 degrees F
5 seconds - 10.3 volts, 11.7 amps, and 1560 degrees F
9 seconds - 10.3 volts, 9.66 amps, and 1905 degrees F
12 seconds - 10.4 volts, 8.6 amps, and 2000 degrees F

AC60G (Beru) plug for 6.2 and 6.5 diesels
2 seconds - 10 volts, 8.6 amps and 807 degrees F
5 seconds - 10 volts, 8 amps and 1145 degrees F
9 seconds - 10 volts, 7.3 amps and 1545 degrees F
12 seconds - 10 volts, 7 amps, and 1716 degrees F

Cranking speed is critical in cold starting. At zero degrees or below - a OEM style gear-reduction starter will outcrank an equivalent direct-drive starter by 200 RPM - which can make a big difference.
So can simply getting your cranking voltage up. Good batteries of a standard size will result in your DC cranking voltage at zero degrees to be around 9 volts. If you install larger batteries (more CCA), you can get your cranking voltage up to 9.5 and sometimes 10 VDC which makes a huge difference in cranking speed - with any starter.

Advancing your static timing a few pump degees can also make a big difference in some engines.

If you wanted to spend some real money, a diesel-fired block-heater is a god-send for diesels that are not parked near electricity. Hooks to your fuel tank and comes on automatically or manually. Been used in Europe for years but just getting popular here now. Ford and GM now offer them factory installed on diesel trucks. I'm waiting for the price to come down on them - for now it's rediculous.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I have an extension cord that is rated for 13a 125v 1625w. It's 14 awg but it doesn't have a ground, just 2 prong. Will this work?
 
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