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Slick, but very expensive, $2995! I didn't see anything for filtration. Guess that's an extra cost. Looks like you could make a system yourself alot cheaper. Great product for those end of the world survivalists.



I'd bet it would take some time to break even. Assuming you could save $.30/gallon (guestimate for the fuel tax cost of one gallon), you would break even after burning 9983 gallons. 26 gallons used per week is equalent to 1350 gallons per year. So in 7 1/3 years you might break even. Having said that, the website states that you're responsible for paying road tax for every gallon of fuel you make. That's probably on the honor system. But is doesn't seem like a good deal to me.
 

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Yes, that is a long payback. I wonder how much you have to pay per gallon of methenol? Bad thing about methenol, is that when it burns, it is very difficult to see the flame, as it is colorless.


On one of the pages they show a man filling up a Furd dually, out of a 55 gallon drum with an electric pump with dual fuel filters.


This might be worth the investment if you had multiple diesel engines, heated your home with oil, and had a good steady supply of used vegetable oil. I think Ohio's fuel tax is around .43 a gallon. If you don't dye the fuel, how they gonna know?
Edited by: Pick
 

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Pick, you can buy biodiesel in Cleveland (down in the flats at Great Lakes Brewery) There is a start up called Biodiesel Cleveland (biodieselcleveland.com) Right now they have limited production , but they will sell you B20 or B100 that is certified (that means the road taxes have been paid) I have used it ,it seems to work well,it definitly mellows the exhaust.It would seem to be a win win situation more money going to our economy ,not to the middle east.Less dependency on foreign oil is also good for national security . The politions have to Wake up.There are also big time enviromental benefits. I think they are working to get a staion to sell B20 on the east side (271 area) Also checkout biodiesel.org
 

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Thanks, FEG3, I'll have to check it out. I am in Chardon, btw.
 

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The cost of lye and methonol runs about $0.72/gallon. So if you don't count your labor, the savings is nearly $1/gallon.


Or look at it this way. If you are getting 15 mpg, your cost per mile makes this equivalent to getting 36 mpg.


Now if you have a K3500 with big 53 gal tank like I do, plus an in bed tank holding another 100 gallons, and you keep your speed down, you could drive from New York to Reno for $108.


Note: I did not include the one time cost of tanks to mix and store the stuff.


I plan on making my own and using it for home heating fuel, to fuel my boat and my truck. I like the idea of being able to crank up the heat and I like the idea of recycling.


Also, note that both Lye and Methol are toxic and dangerous until mixed with the Used Vegitable Oil (UVO). Use long sleeve clothes and a face mask until mixed. After it is mixed, it is safe. The by-product gycerin (soap) is bio-degradeable, and can be tossed out anywhere.


 

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Night Sailor, I have heard on an RV forum that glycerin, when applied to tires, in particular, trailer tires will prevent sidewall cracking and dry rot. You might want to keep a gallon or two on hand. I hear it is over $100 a gallon to buy.
 

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Pick said:
Night Sailor, I have heard on an RV forum that glycerin, when applied to tires, in particular, trailer tires will prevent sidewall cracking and dry rot. You might want to keep a gallon or two on hand. I hear it is over $100 a gallon to buy.

This is unrefined glycerin. If you want to put more effort into refining it, you could sell it. I'm unfamiliar with the use of glycerin for tire care. I think it is best to not get overly involved with gylcerin and simply chuck somewhere it will biodegrade back into the soil.


Many people are making the equipment to make bio-diesel for not a lot of money. Once place I saw had the equipment for less than $1000 dollars.


Several people I've seen online, are supplying 50 gallon drums to fast food places and chinese restaurants to collect the UVO. These places have to pay to dispose of UVO and I'm told it is not hard to find places that willl give it away for free so save money. Starting with one or supplier makes sense until you get a feel about your consumption and usage. Providing 50 gallon drums seems to be an easy way to provide for pickup.


I first want to figure out how to haul and store Used Vegitable Oil (UVO). I'm leaning towards using a trailer with a tank of some sort on it, whatever I can find for free. I'd use compressed air to blow it out of the 50 gallon drums into the transport tank.


After bringing it home, I could use pressure to pump it into a 330 gallon fuel oil tank, or if my transport tank was big enough, I could process it immediately.


Some factors to consider. Water weighs 8.33 lbs/gallon. Biodiesel is less at 7.35 lbs/gallon. A full 330 gallon fuel oil tank would weigh 2450 lbs. These are not cheap. I think it might be better to have one welded up that is even larger and put it in the bed of a pickup truck or bolt it to the frame of a trailer.


Water is 62 lbs/cubic foot, and biodiesel is about 55 lbs/cubic foot. I'd guess UVO is in between these two.


My goal is to start by spending 2 hours a week, making one batch at first and grow production from there.


I'm also thinking about building a mobile processor on an old trailer that can be tarped up in the winter, and dragged over to the storage tanks when needed. I have an 1986 1-ton chevy 6.2 ltr pickup truck that might suit the purpose. I'm also considering making or modifying a trailer to haul UVO, and perhaps a trailer to process it like Mike Pelly (below).





Here is another method. It is not difficult.


http://journeytoforever.org/biodiesel_processor4.html


Unfortunately, it is not legal to sell pure biodiesel. the licensing fees are around $100,000 effectively cutting off small business enterprises. So, it is a personal consumption type of business.


Storage is a big issue. Also you have to consider what it will do to your back yard. So it is more practical for a farm, or for someone with a basement with room for storage tanks, or someone with underground storage tanks. Processing needs to
 

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Glycerine is a dense fuel. I'm sure the right engine could use it.


Like a Pyrolisis engine. or any inclosed furnance you could convert.


The cumbustion chamber has to reach 1500+deg.F before glycerine will burn well.
 
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