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I only use my 2007.5 3500 (160,000 miles) for hauling my overhead camper in the summer. With winter approaching I'm getting ready to put it into outdoor storage for the next 6 months or so. This will be in Boise, ID so there will be some snow, and temps will likely be between 10-40 degrees most of the time.

So far I have done an oil change with Rotella T6, new fuel filter, new transmission filter, & two new batteries.

What are some other best practices to ensure it will be ready to go when I pull it from storage next spring?
 

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put the batteries on a trickle charger/maintainer
 

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I second the maintainer. I'd disconnect the batteries from the truck if not.
 

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Thanks guys, will do. What do you recommend for the fuel? Full tank? Empty tank? Additives?
Definitely use an anti-gel additive in the tank during storage
 

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A full tank. I had a 6.2 suburban that sat in a building in Texas for 7 years. I put it up with a full tank. When I went to get it, it was down to 5/8 of a tank. New batteries and it fired right up. The diesel was real oily and it smoked a little more than normal. Then I drove down to gas station and filled it up, after the second fill up a couple hundred miles later the smoke diminished.
 

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Full / nearly full fuel tank means less air will be sucked in when it 'breathes' due to temperature change, and means it will draw in less moisture (humidity) to condense out of the air.

Fresh engine oil.
I wouldn't worry about changing the trans oil unless it is somewhere near needing a change anyway.

Batteries self-discharge (slowly) and the truck will likely have standby battery drain.
Plan to either top them up during storage (even if it's just a maintainer hooked up for a day or 2 once every 4-6 weeks -- or remove the batteries to a location where they can be maintained.

DO NOT resort to running the engine when parked.
It might top up the battery -- but it will introduce lots of water from the combustion process. If the engine can't be run and driven/worked, it won't get hot enough overcome this.
The vapour visible from tailpipes during cold weather is water vapour that is visible because the tailpipe exhaust temperature is less than the boiling point (steam is invisible).
Water drips from exhaust systems is more of the same issue.
 
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