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Discussion Starter #1
Okay, from what I've been able to determine here, the new LLY engine that my truck is supposed to be coming with, is 50 State emissions certified. Meaning that in order to meet California requirements, everybody is going to have to put up with EGR and CAT's.


Since EGT's are a prime consideration if one is going to "chip" a Duramax, and reduced exhaust backpressure helps to relieve that concern, aren't we all stuck with the factory exhaust due to laws regarding the modification of polution controls?


Will it be worthwhile to install a lower restriction muffler when the CAT has to remain?


Thoughts anyone?


Thanks,


Gary
 

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Who says the cat has to remain?!?
 

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here here to tysmith.



The new powerstrokes are equiped with cats that are to be removed upon delivery for enhanced performace just like the new duramax. I know I'll be removing mine. I am willing to bet you will be able to block the EGR too....



Lenny
 

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Actually the EGR and CAT are in place to meet 2004 Federal emission requirements.


The CAT is easy to remove if you want. The EGR would be a little more of a challenge. There are numerous on-board diagnostics in place to monitor it's operation.Edited by: OC_DMAX
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm not sure that's the case. Maybe for a forthcoming standard, otherwise why would the LB7 have been offered in both a California and a rest of the country version? Seems like it's still California exceeding the Federal guidelines, and since it's a hassle for the manufacturers to build multiple configurations, it looks like that's the case of the LLY only being built in one configuration.


In any event, once it's there I think it's illegal to remove in my State whether it's required or not. So my question is would a low restriction muffler help improve exhaust flow and reduce EGT?
 

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Beginning January 1st, 2004 the allowed emission levels produced by new diesel engines in heavy duty vehicles will essential be halved. It has nothing to do with California versus the other 49 states.


In the 1998 / 1999 timeframe, the EPA created legislation to substantially reduce the amount of Hydrocarbons and specifically Oxides of Nitrogren from heavy duty vehicles. For diesel engines, the major break points are in 2004 and 2007. One of the goals of the legislation written in 1998/1999 for heavy duty vehicles was to unify the emission requirements (Federal and California). That is why your new vehicle with an LLY engine is certified to 50 states,,,,,,, there is one emission level. The Federal and California standards are the same. Prior to 2004, California had one set of emission levels and the Fed another. That is why my 2002 California DMAX has an EGR/CAT while those in Utah (for instance) do not.


The above is the reason (in my opinion) for the new LLY engine. The LB7 engine needed a "make-over" to meet these new Federally mandated emission requirements.


Just wait until 2007. The emission levels drop to approximately 1/10 of the 2004 levels (if I remember correctly!!). The DMAX as we know it will change again.


I believe there are those who have replaced just the muffler and reported a 100 deg F drop in EGT's.Edited by: OC_DMAX
 

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From what I understand, the 2007 change is why we are not seeing more diesels in GM's product line up. Really a shame, especially when you consider that biodiesel would greatly reduce our dependence on foreign oil and support the American farmer (soybean oil and grain alcohol blend).


I wonder how it is that Europe has no problem supporting the use of diesel engines?
 
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