Diesel Place banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
311 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is an additive necessary. I live in mid- Michigan, it gets cold. I have never used anything besides a little 2+4 every now an then. Is an additive necessary, am I asking for problems or am I ok ??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,863 Posts
Opinions are all over the map on this one. I, at the very least, would run a lubricant. The new low sulfur diesel is dry as a bone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,262 Posts
Wont hurt there are only Pros to using the proper additives.


Water emulsifying: You will find water content in most pump fuel
Good lubrication : Low sulfur fuel is harsh,quieter running engine
Cetane booster: Cleaner burning

Your engine fuel system will thank you.Using the proper recommended amount only adds pennies to tankfuls.

Well worth it IMO,I use at every fill up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
241 Posts
maybe consider Power Service, u can buy it at walmart for about 5$ for 150 gal treatment
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
695 Posts
maybe consider Power Service, u can buy it at walmart for about 5$ for 150 gal treatment
Power service is what I use! good stuff!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Effective in early 2006 in Canada the government has mandated that sulfur levels be further reduced from 300 ppm to 15 ppm. The main problem here is that the sulfur atoms are right in the middle of the "heavy" molecules. To remove the sulfur, the "heavies" will be stripped removing a good deal of the fuel's lubricity. Bad news for injectors, pumps, etc. I would highly recommend running a lubricating additive.

Cheers,
Jay
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
747 Posts
If anything throw about 8 ounces of 2 cycle in it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
817 Posts
Wont hurt there are only Pros to using the proper additives.


Water emulsifying: You will find water content in most pump fuel
Good lubrication : Low sulfur fuel is harsh,quieter running engine
Cetane booster: Cleaner burning

Your engine fuel system will thank you.Using the proper recommended amount only adds pennies to tankfuls.

Well worth it IMO,I use at every fill up.
You mean de-emulsifying, right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
574 Posts
Wont hurt there are only Pros to using the proper additives.


Water emulsifying: You will find water content in most pump fuel
Good lubrication : Low sulfur fuel is harsh,quieter running engine
Cetane booster: Cleaner burning

Your engine fuel system will thank you.Using the proper recommended amount only adds pennies to tankfuls.

Well worth it IMO,I use at every fill up.
If you're finding water in most of your fuel I think I'd buy it elsewhere. The average amount dissolved in diesel runs between 100 (0.01%) to 200 ppm (0.02%). The maximum by ASTM spec is 500 ppm (0.05%) water and sediment. That is such a small amount that it takes very expensive lab equipment to detect and measure it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,621 Posts
Yes, use an additive. It's a pain in the butttttt when filling up but, your engine will last longer and you'll even gain a mile per gallon or so on the mileage...at least I do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
lubricant is deff a good idea, ya get a little more power, better fuel efficiency and its good for your engine, its a good thing no matter where you live!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
If you're looking for a really good additive to add lubricity, you should check out the conditioners from LubeCorp. I am from Calgary where they make the stuff, so I stopped in there one day to check them out.

On Stanadyne's web site there are the results from comparitive lubricity tests that Stanadyne ran against quite a few other conditioners where Stanadyne came out ahead of the pack. LubeCorp ran their own conditioners against Stanadyne's in an independent lab test and blew them out of the water. They showed me the test results while I was there. They seemed very free about their information sharing, so I'm sure if anyone was interested in contacting them, they would send you a copy of those tests. I couldn't find the test results on their web site.

Cheers,
Jay
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
ttyler, Meijer gas stations all have Schaffer's Fuel Additive in their diesel. I don't know how close you are to these two places, but their fuel is one of the best..... It's listed on the pumps as PREMIUM... Hope this helps and Welcome aboard.

1. Midland 7300 Eastman Ave.
Midland , MI 48642
(989) 839-5900
2. Wilder Rd 2980 E Wilder Rd
Bay City , MI 48706
(989) 686-7722
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
574 Posts
If you're looking for a really good additive to add lubricity, you should check out the conditioners from LubeCorp. I am from Calgary where they make the stuff, so I stopped in there one day to check them out.

On Stanadyne's web site there are the results from comparitive lubricity tests that Stanadyne ran against quite a few other conditioners where Stanadyne came out ahead of the pack. LubeCorp ran their own conditioners against Stanadyne's in an independent lab test and blew them out of the water. They showed me the test results while I was there. They seemed very free about their information sharing, so I'm sure if anyone was interested in contacting them, they would send you a copy of those tests. I couldn't find the test results on their web site.

Cheers,
Jay
According to some material they sent, their test was “done under the auspices of the SGS Company”. It didn’t say that SGS did the test. I’ve asked them via email regarding this but haven’t received an answer. The Stanadyne tests were performed by and at Southwest Research Institute. In that lubricity study, Stanadyne scored 357 as opposed to 373 in the testing you’re referring to. That’s a notable discrepancy. Who knows, but if they score roughly like Stanadyne, that’s pretty good and would seem to indicate it might be a very good lubricity additive. If concerned about the water matter, they do state their product isn’t a demulsifier but contains an emulsifier. Do you know what the stuff cost? I’ve never seen it in my area.

Edit: Jay, I just recieved the following from Lube Corp: "Hello Charles, to answer your question about the separation of the water into Hydrogen and Oxygen, it is done chemically with minimal heat loss. The result being that the molecules are much smaller and so they are able to pass into the combustion chamber without hurting the injector tips. There is a corresponding increase in heat (about 15oC) from the superheated steam." They had previously told me that their product contains an "emulsifier" that "Breaks down the water molecules to make them smaller." They kind of lost me on that so I asked if they ment breaking down the water molecules to hydrogen and oxygen as I could think of nothing else in regards to "breaking down molecules" into smaller parts and that their "emulsifier" did that. The above was the reply I received. Now they're mentioning steam in the cylinders and I'm more lost than ever.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top