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Well, it turns out that seafoam does nothing detectable to solve the problem I have.

I think one of my injectors simply doesn't like low load, elevated RPM conditions. It's done this smoking thing since I've owned it (4 years), yet it starts, idles, cruises, accelerates perfectly, every time. No oil consumption, normal operating temperatures. But, that's only my first guess, and I have no experience with diesel engines.

It seems the only way to know for sure is to change out those injectors. Or, get them tested and cleaned/serviced, if that is done any more. Something new to learn about.

Are fuel injectors particularly difficult to remove and replace on the 6.5? Comparable to spark plugs in difficulty?
I would pop test those injectors. You can test them yourself and make a pop tester out of a bottle jack. there are a few "How to " videos on Youtube on making a pop tester out of a bottle jack.

Injectors are fairly straightforward to remove/replace. You won't have a turbo getting in your way but still can be a knuckle buster if you're not careful.
When reinstalling be sure to use new return lines. There are kits out there that use no hold down clamps that will make things a little easier
 

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Yes, grey/white smoke can be injectors. It can also be a cooling system issue or just a glow plug system issue.
If it was a cooling system issue, you would also see bubbles within the coolant, recovery tank, hard upper rad hose while the engine is running, signs of oil in coolant or coolant in the oil.
Glow plug issues would be hard starts, heavy smoke that clears up. WTS light that stays on longer than normal, etc

Injectors that leak can cause some bad issues for an engine.
Leaky injectors will leave unburned fuel to pool up in the cylinder and cause excessive EGT's, pistons can crack or melt and cook the heads. excessive smoke, poor performance.
If you do not know the history of the Injectors then I would just recommend that you replace them.
If you know the history then you can test them.
 

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Exactly what I needed to know. New injectors, it will be. Thanks for your help!
When replacing the injectors it is recommended that you only use the OEM Bosch Injectors
 

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Absolutely, I will.

The auto service shop from where I rent the spot for my business isn't a diesel shop, but I offered them the work to replace the injectors. I haven't reviewed the procedure or surveyed the engine compartment to assess the difficulty, but if they'll accept, I'll have them do it. The work will be warranted, parts and labor (as is the recent refresh they did to the front of the engine).

Otherwise, I'm a bit concerned about where to find a diesel shop that does this sort of work, especially on older equipment. Competently. Any clown with a set of tools can troubleshoot by substitution. I seek the guy that knows why. I'm sure there's someone near.
The easiest way to do this without any issues is to replace one bank of injectors and return lines then start and run the engine to work out the air.
Then replace the other bank with return lines then start and run it again to work out any remaining air in the system.
There is a great guide listed in the 6.5L FAQ page: Injector replacement for novice mechanics, or......
 

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That doesn't seem so simple.

May I ask what exactly are the differences between the injectors for the normally aspirated and the turbocharged models of the 6.5?

While reading our FAQ post on injector part numbers, there are two entries in the Bosch table for 6.5L NA engines. How do I know which to use?

I'm not seeing an abundance of injectors available for the normally aspirated 6.5 engines. What are the effects of using the model of injectors for the turbocharged 6.5 in my normally aspirated 6.5?

Regarding the Bosch preference, the other two manufacturers (Stanadyne and Delphi) are names known to me. Can you comment on your preference? I had a look on OReilly's web site, and they have AC Delco injectors. This decision may come down to what is available, but I'm curious about the differences.

Lots of questions, new things to learn. Everyone wants to make good decisions. Thanks for your help.
The difference between the injectors are the N/A injectors are set at a lower pop rate for the economy precups in the heads
The turbo 6.5 has different precups and higher pop rate injectors
 

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The situation seems to be fuel starvation, caused by fouled fuel filter, clogged by clay. I've scheduled the service to drop the fuel tank and clean it. I have to eliminate that question mark, and I don't think a case of fuel filters is the best way to do that.

While working, they can scope the tank interior to inspect, and replace it if needed.

It appears the fuel filter did its job. Though, I suspect a particle got stirred through the screen in the fuel filter manager as I was removing the filter, and blocked an injector for a few seconds. But, that is conjecture. A few minutes into the test drive after replacing the fuel filter, one cylinder made a hell of a knocking sound for a few seconds. It cleared, and has not returned since.

Any ideas what that knocking was? I hope I didn't damage the engine.
Tank delamination has been an issue with some vehicles. Have them inspect the interior of the tank well
 

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I’m back to close the loop on this problem.

There was a lot going on, all at once, and I think I started it with that dose of Seafoam injector cleaner.

My injectors had some carbon deposits. But, I imagine they were working fine all along.

The real problem was the a clogged fuel filter. It was filled with flakes from the fuel tank liner, as well as corrosion flakes from the fuel tank as well. Seeking to preemptively remove any injector deposits, I think the Seafoam solvents did their job on the liner of the fuel tank, clogging the fuel filter, causing fuel starvation.

I probably replaced the injectors unnecessarily, and I know all of the glow plugs were working, too. With the fuel starvation problem resolved, the L57 engine in my van is once more very, very happy.

The resolution was to replace the fuel tank. No more contamination from the tank itself! After the tank went in, I gave it a fresh fuel filter again. While I was at it, I lengthened the drain line on the fuel filter manager, so I can take a good fuel sample without splattering diesel oil all over the chassis under the engine.

I just corrected the last fault I was experiencing: bumbling but successful starts on cold (freezing temps) mornings. It did it again to me this morning. Started right up, but bumbled for about four seconds before smoothing out perfectly. I found cylinder eight’s glow plug wire wasn’t connected. Cylinder eight wouldn’t fire on a cold morning, until it had enough compression cycles to begin dieseling properly. It would cause exactly what I observed. An ”oops” from the mechanic.

It turns out it doesn’t need a new DB2 injection pump after all. I’m glad I didn’t replace it unnecessarily.

Thanks for your suggestions and help, everyone.
Glad you got the issue resolved.
Thanks for giving us an update!
(y)
 
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