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It is my understanding the dodge uses bosch injectors as well, why are they so much cheaper than ours when our engine has been out for 3 years already??
 

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Put out the question on two other sites. Did not get a direct answer. Two mechanics said they have never done an injector replacement at their dealerships. Another fellow mentioned that there have been some Cummins with very early, under 10,000 mile injector replacements. His conclusion was they must have had a manufacturing defect to fail so soon.


Will continue to ask but so far have not found anyone with the problem.
 

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Being a new member, this is my first post. I'm from Grande Prairie, Alberta, Canada. Duramax injectors retail at $735.00 Canadian. Checked out prices on bocsh injectors from our two dodge dealers in Grande Prairie - one quoted retail of $1,175.00 per each injector - the other quoted retail of $1,098.00 per injector in Canadian dollars. So GM is not that bad after all.
 

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The only Cummins that uses the Bosch high pressure direct rail system like the Dmax is the new ('03 and '04?) HO engines. There has not been enough time for a lot of those engines to get to ~80,000 miles where you are starting to get up on the bell curve for injector failures. When they do get there, they will experience failures at the same (very low!) rate that the Dmax engines do. It is the same system, and the injectors are going to be very close to the same price.





The fuel injection system on these engines is the highest technology systerm on the truck, and it is pushing the edge of the capabilities of high volume manufacturing. A few injector and pump failures is the price we have to pay for this awesome high technology engine. The technology and manufactuering systems for these components will get better every year. Remember that this fuel system is what allows us to add huge amounts of hp and torque with a simple add-on computer box. It is also what makes the engine run so quietly. Also remember that GM is covering you for ANY engine problems (including injectors) for the first 100,000 miles.


I am sick of the injector crybabies
.Edited by: Black Dog
 

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Black Dog said:
The fuel injection system on these engines is the highest technology systerm on the truck, and it is pushing the edge of the capabilities of high volume manufacturing.


A few injector and pump failures is the price we have to pay for this awesome high technology engine.

I'd bet most Dmax owners didin't sign up for a R&D project, rather the DMax was understood, by GM promotion, to be "best in class durability."


Black Dog said:
The technology and manufactuering systems for these components will get better every year.

Is that so? Every year? Hasn't happened yet. GM's recent news release states these injectors are good for only about 100,000 miles. GM seems to be getting a better understanding year after year.


Aside from that, GM continues to have gas injector class action lawsuits in the news. Clearly, these haven't gotten better year after year.
 

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Get me in and out of the dealer for around 800.00 total and I will have 8 injectors replaced at 70k even if stock have performed flawlessly. Maybe I will even change them myself.( with one of those killer pict. D.I.Y. articles.) Injectors for Musatangs made by Bosch are only 30.00 each. What gives?
 

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Well, Bronco, the injectors for the Mustangs run at about 25 psi fuel pressure and inject into an intake manifold at a slight vacuum. Not only wimpy, but we whoop them in the 1/4 mile!
 

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Central Motive Power had a special on Genuine Bosch Inlectors for $349 ea (plus $150 core). The fact that they even sell them might indicate a larger problem than we realize. That there is a core charge seems to indicate they can be rebuilt (which many times we had to do with regular injectors about 80-100k).


Over the long run, I believe that GM or Bosch will have to step up and deal with this situation. While we don't like doing the R&D for the manufacturers, the reality is that until a vehicle and all its components are subjected to mass production and the consumer, no one really knows what was missed. Test vehicles are literally hand built, so there is much less variation than would be seen on an assembly line. Further, testing is done by professional testers under circumstances that are more controlled that we experience every day. Even most of the fuel comes from special tanks at the proving ground. Hot Rod Magazine had an interesting article on the GM Desert Proving Ground in Mesa, AZ, which talked about some of the ways vehicles are tested. I am sure that there is real world testing as well, but the article made me wonder how much. I'd like them to run with me on a real world trip with horses (or with many of you) and see what the people who use their trucks everyday come up against.


Knowing what I know, if I had injector failures beyond 100k, I would sure try to get it covered under warranty as a "goodwill" gesture. But mentime, I am going to keep up with my filters, buy as much of my fuel as I can from a place I frequent (who has fuel that tested in the top 1% in the nation for quality), and hope the problem gets resolved before I see 100k.
 

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Idle_Chatter said:
Well, Bronco, the injectors for the Mustangs run at about 25 psi fuel pressure and inject into an intake manifold at a slight vacuum. Not only wimpy, but we whoop them in the 1/4 mile!







your a little off on those specs, my Mustang's injectors are regulated down to about 40PSI, the pump will output about 100-125psi, if you run something like a FMU (which most do when supercharged or turboed) to squeeze more fuel through during the same duty cycle those injectors start to see all of 80PSI or more. Granted this is not the 25000 psi that a Dmax see's. If i remember right i think i got all 8 oversized injectors (Bosch) for my stang for about $300, to bad the dmax can't be priced like that.... FWIW my Duramax does not stand a chance against my Mustang even with the juice and attitude it gets left in the dust big time!
 

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Ray403Dmax said:
Black Dog said:
The fuel injection system on these engines is the highest technology systerm on the truck, and it is pushing the edge of the capabilities of high volume manufacturing.


A few injector and pump failures is the price we have to pay for this awesome high technology engine.

I'd bet most Dmax owners didin't sign up for a R&D project, rather the DMax was understood, by GM promotion, to be "best in class durability."


What I posed hardly described "an R&D project" every component on every vehicle has a given failure rate which is always characterized by a bell curve.


Black Dog said:
The technology and manufactuering systems for these components will get better every year.

Is that so? Every year? Hasn't happened yet. GM's recent news release states these injectors are good for only about 100,000 miles. GM seems to be getting a better understanding year after year.


Aside from that, GM continues to have gas injector class action lawsuits in the news. Clearly, these haven't gotten better year after year.


What "news release" are you talking about? Also, what gas injector class action law suits?
 

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Got a report from a fellow using Dallas Dodge as his source. A set of 6 injectors cost about $1,200. That's what I figured ..... couple of hundred each RETAIL.
 

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Black Dog said:
What I posed hardly described "an R&D project"....

Research and development projects are a learning process where designs change for feasability, reliability, and manufacturabilty. Of course this all happens before the customer plops his money down. Neither these injectors nor the fuel filtering system were ready for production prime time.


Black Dog said:
every component on every vehicle has a given failure rate which is always characterized by a bell curve.

Yep, and from those bell curves a composite bell curve represents the final product. The relevant point here is the truck's overall bell curve needs to show no weak link in the end product. Injectors with a 100,000 mile life,don't meet the needs of a econo-box gas engine, let alone a diesel pick-up.
 
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